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SOLVAO 7.5W Solar Trickle Charger & Battery Maintainer. Solar battery minder

SOLVAO 7.5W Solar Trickle Charger & Battery Maintainer. Solar battery minder

    SOLVAO 7.5W Solar Trickle Charger Battery Maintainer

    If not used regularly, batteries naturally drain power and if allowed to go flat, may never regain their full power. This solar powered battery maintainer helps manage battery drain in all seasons. The solar charger converts light energy from the sun into 12 volt DC electricity, which is then transported to batteries through a wire and your connector of choice.

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    Includes Our Premium Quality Guarantee w/ 1 Year Warranty

    If not used regularly, batteries naturally drain power and if allowed to go flat, may never regain their full power. This solar powered battery maintainer helps manage battery drain in all seasons. The solar charger converts light energy from the sun into 12 volt DC electricity, which is then transported to batteries through a wire and your connector of choice.

    Keep Your 12v Battery Charged Year-Round

    Use for any rechargeable 12 volt battery and a variety of off grid applications, even in in cloudy conditions and other inclimate weather!

    Our 7.5 watt solar powered trickle charger can be used for any rechargeable 12 volt battery and a variety of off grid applications! Perfect for automobiles, boats, motorcycles, RVs, motorhomes, marine, tractor, powersports, trucks, snowmobiles, golf carts, sheds, cabins, gate openers, and any other automotive or 12V battery applications. Prevents your battery from dying if not in use for an extended time.

    Plug and Play Connectivity with High Efficiency Solar Panel Blocking Diode to Prevent Overcharging

    Easily installed. just plug in the solar panel, set it and forget it! No technical knowledge needed.

    Great for grandparents or vehicle owners who don’t use their cars or auto mobile every day! Just set it up on the dashboard and let it charge your battery. Has a built-in blocking diode for reverse protection, which means the regulator will control the amount of power it sends and won’t damage or over charge your 12volt batteries.

    • Solar energy keeps 12v batteries alive in all seasons
    • High efficiency amorphous solar panel
    • Built-in diode to prevent reverse charging overcharging
    • Quick easy plug-and-play functionality
    • Strong, durable ABS frame
    • Low maintenance, portable and lightweight
    • 2 different charging methods available via alligator battery clamps DC plug

    Charge Any 12 volt Battery with the Power of the Sun

    Because our solar trickle charger is also a maintainer, it safely charges and maintains Wet, Gel, SLA, AGM and Deep Cycle batteries, etc using solar energy. Great to keep handy for emergency preparedness, keeping backup batteries charged, camping, motorhomes and even tents that are powered.

    Setup and installation takes just minutes! This product works right out of the box and can be used on day 1.

    Please fully read the included instruction manual prior to use.

    If you experience damaged product(s), defects, or issues of any kind, please reach out to our support team immediately. we are happy to help and will address any issues immediately!

    This is an awesome solar charger. I’ve used it a few times on my RV battery and it’s done a great jobDennis Burrill

    SOLVAO 7.5W Solar Trickle Charger Battery Maintainer

    What Are People Saying About This Solar Battery Charger?

    I had been looking for an inexpensive solar charger to keep my RV battery charged. This was the perfect answer. 7.5 watt trickle charge is perfect for when my RV is not being used. Plug and play feature makes for easy setup and teardown. Would recommend.

    The length of the cord makes it adaptable to different situations. I use it in my shed with the panel on the side wall. It’s very easy to plug in and out when needed. Works great keeping the battery strong Michael W.

    “This is a great little unit to keep your vehicle go-ready, especially in extreme heat or cold, when batteries tend to fail. Easy to use, no extra power source required. So cool!”

    “I get these for my RVs (I build them Out of school buses). This one is mounted on my roof and works great so far. Better than the flexible panels for a more permanent answer.”

    SBC750 Solar Battery Maintainer FAQs

    No, this unit does not require a solar controller. There is a built-in diode to prevent over-charging.

    This charger is not meant to fully charge 12v batteries, but to keep them topped off so they don’t die when not in use.

    What output connections are available? if i have an electric generator with a dc, 8mm connector can i use these panels to recharge it? adapter?

    This solar trickle charger includes a built-in cord measuring 8 feet, 8 inches with an SAE connector at the end. The following 2 adapters come with the unit for different applications: 1 x alligator clips for 12v battery, 1 x 12v cigarette lighter adapter.

    Is there a longer cord available for the charger so the panel can be further from the battery so I can put it in a better position to get the sunlight?

    At this time, we don’t offer separate cord for the solar trickle charger ​but we do plan on adding that in the future.

    Full Product Description Specs

    Please fully read the included instruction manual prior to use.

    If you experience damaged product(s), defects, or issues of any kind, please reach out to our support team immediately. we are happy to help and will address any issues immediately!

    If not used regularly, batteries naturally drain power and if allowed to go flat, may never regain their full power. This solar powered battery maintainer helps manage battery drain in all seasons. The solar charger converts light energy from the sun into 12 volt DC electricity, which is then transported to batteries through a wire and your connector of choice.

    A reverse blocking diode inside the unit ensures the charger will not damage or over-charge your battery. Please note, this charger is designed to send a slow, steady charge to the battery and is not designed to fully charge any battery.

    • Maximum Power: Up to 7.5 watts
    • Current at Pmax: 400mA
    • Voltage at Pmax: 18v
    • Solar Panel Type: Amorphous
    • Measurements: 13 3/10 x 13 3/10 x 7/10
    • Weight: 2.73 lbs
    • Solar energy keeps 12v batteries alive in all seasons
    • High effeciency amourphous solar panel
    • Built-in diode to prevent reverse charging overcharging
    • Quick easy plug-and-play functionality
    • Strong, durable ABS frame
    • High quality glass covers the solar panel
    • Low maintenace, portable and lightweight
    • 2 different charging methods available via alligator battery clamps DC plug
    • 1 x Solar Panel w/ 8 ft. 8 in. SAE connector cord
    • 1 x Battery Clamps (approx 2 ft. with cord)
    • 1 x DC Plug (approx 2 ft. with cord)
    • 4 x Mounting Screws

    The Best Jet Ski Battery Charger – Voltage, Amps, and Tips You Need

    The best jet ski battery charger will be a 12-volt Smart charger that charges at a max of 2 amps.

    You must not charge over 2 amps, and you need to use a Smart battery charger. There are also other little details you need to do that we’ll discuss below.

    A battery charger sometimes goes by the names trickle charger and battery maintainer too.

    Important: Just like a boat, it’s good practice to vent your jet ski for a few minutes before working on it or starting it, especially if it’s been sitting, or you just put gas in it.

    NOCO GENIUS2, 2-Amp Fully-Automatic Smart Charger

    My top pick for the best jet ski battery charger is the NOCO GENIUS2 2-Amp Fully-Automatic Smart Charger. Here are the reasons why it’s my top pick.

    • 2 Amps – not too much and not too little of charging power, it’s just right.
    • Smart charger – It turns on and off as the battery needs it.
    • Has a built-in maintainer.
    • Can detect sulfation and help restore a battery.
    • One of the few Smart battery chargers that will try to bring back a dead battery.
    • Small – It doesn’t take up much room.
    • Its alligator clips are easy to use on jet ski batteries.
    • Temperature compensation – Needed for hot days or cold days in storage.

    Tip: These battery chargers are the same you find for car batteries. So yes, you can use a battery charger made for car batteries for your jet ski battery, so long as it’s 12-volt and meets the correct amps.

    Battery Tender Plus 12V Battery Charger and Maintainer

    My second place pick is the Battery Tender Plus 12V Battery Charger and Maintainer. Here is why I picked it.

    • 1.25 amps – Just enough amps to charge a jet ski battery at a good speed.
    • Super simple to use – Plug it in, connect to the battery and select 12 volts and let it go.
    • Maintainer – Turns on and off as the battery needs it.
    • Small – Stores away nicely when not in use.

    Solar Battery Charger

    A solar battery charger is the best option if you need to charge or maintain your jet ski battery without a power outlet.

    This is what I use on my jet ski to help maintain the battery, and I go over the full details here.

    How To Charge A Jet Ski Battery

    But here is a short version…

    • For best results, remove the battery from the jet ski.
    • Connect the positive cable of the charger to the positive post of the battery.
    • Connect the negative cable of the charger to the negative post of the battery.
    • Plug the battery charger power cord into the correct wall outlet.
    • Wait for the Smart charger lights to go on and let you know it’s charging.

    When charging is done, remove the negative cable of the charger first and the positive cable next.

    Battery Charger Is Not Charging Jet Ski Battery?

    If the battery charger status lights don’t come on when you connect it to the battery, then make sure you have it hooked up right.

    The positive cable of the charger goes to the positive of the battery, and the negative of the charger goes to the negative of the battery.

    If the lights do come on, but the charger says the battery is bad, you need to get a new battery. The battery is too sulfated to recover.

    If the battery charger says the battery is charged, but when you start the jet ski, it doesn’t start, then you only had a surface charge. There could be other reasons why your jet ski is not starting as talked about here.

    A surface charge is not a full charge, and you’ll need to get a new battery no matter what the charger says about the battery charged status. Only a load tester can determine if the battery is good to start a jet ski and not the LED light on the charger. If you don’t have a load tester, many auto part stores will load test a battery for you, and a lot do it for free.

    How Do I Know My Jet Ski Battery Is Bad?

    What matters more than voltage is amps, and a load tester can only test this. Many auto parts stores will load test a battery for you.

    The easiest way to tell if your jet ski battery is bad is by listening to the engine area when you start your jet ski.

    A weak battery will struggle to turn over, especially in the water.

    A super-weak battery will give you multiple clicking noises when you press the start button, as talked about here.

    A completely dead battery may power on the gauges, but nothing happens after that.

    The majority of starting issues you’ll run into with your jet ski will most often be a bad battery. So if your jet ski won’t start replacing the battery is often the first thing you should do, even if you think the battery is fine.

    Can You Recharge A Jet Ski Battery and How Often?

    Jet ski batteries are rechargeable, but they will die and won’t recharge if you don’t use your jet ski for 4 months.

    It’s best to recharge your jet ski battery every 3 months that you don’t ride.

    So if you don’t ride your jet ski in August and September you should charge your battery at least once in October.

    Tip: If you’re not riding for a few months you should take the battery out and use the Smart chargers with a maintainer built-in to keep the battery good when in storage.

    Does Your Jet Ski Need a Battery Switch?

    No, your jet ski does not have a battery switch and does not need one either.

    The reason why your jet ski battery dies is not that the jet ski is always pulling a little power, but instead, it’s because the lead-acid battery goes flat if it’s not being used regularly.

    If you ride your jet ski all the time, the battery stays active and lasts for a long time because it’s being used. However, when you leave it to sit for too long, it goes flat, and adding a battery switch doesn’t fix this.

    Instead of a battery switch, consider getting a solar charger. When you’re not riding, hook up the solar charger, and it will keep the battery active and lasting for longer. See how I have my solar charger set up on my jet ski.

    What Amp To Charge Jet Ski Battery?

    You want to charge your jet ski battery at a max of 2 amps. Lower amps like 0.75 to 2 amps are fine too.

    Going over 2 amps charges the battery too fast for these small batteries, and you can end up cooking the battery, which is very bad.

    When charging your jet ski battery, you need to have it ventilated as lead-acid batteries release a small amount of hydrogen and oxygen when charging. Leave the access panel, seat, or hood ajar when charging your jet ski battery or better yet, take it out of the jet ski. Also, keep the rain off your jet ski when you have an access panel, seat, or hood open, so you don’t flood your jet ski with rainwater.

    How Long Does It Take To Charge A Jet Ski Battery?

    It takes about 12 hours to charge an empty jet ski battery fully.

    It can take longer or shorter depending on what the Smart charger considers is best for your battery. This is why we suggest using Smart chargers as they turn on and off as they’re needed.

    You need to let your battery charge fully and slowly if you want the battery to last. It’s best to not rush these things.

    When Should You Replace A Jet Ski Battery?

    The most I’ve gone without replacing a jet ski battery is 5 years, but that is because I kept it on the solar charger when I was not using it.

    Ideally, it would be best if you replaced your jet ski battery every 3 years.

    If you’re replacing your jet ski battery every year, then it means you’re not riding it enough or charging it enough during the off-season. Lead-acid batteries go bad when they’re not used for months.

    You can sometimes recover a dead battery that’s been sitting for a long time by charging it, but a good bit of them don’t recover.

    Can You Jump Start A Jet Ski Instead Of Charging It?

    No, do NOT jump-start a jet ski battery, especially from your car or truck. I explain why this is bad in this post.

    What Battery Do I Need For My Jet Ski?

    You need a 12-volt battery that ranges in sizes from 16, 20, to 30.

    What type of jet ski battery you need and what is the best one to get can be found in this guide here.

    Do You Need To Add Water To A Jet Ski Battery?

    Adding water to jet ski batteries is not very common these days.

    Most manufacturers are moving to sealed jet ski batteries, which makes adding water a thing of the past.

    Even if you have a non-sealed battery, I would not add water to it and instead, get a new battery. The trouble you would have to go through to get the distilled water, get a hydrometer, and mess with dangerous sulphuric acid is not worth it if you ask me.

    Will Riding My Jet Ski Charge It’s Battery?

    No, riding your jet ski will not fully charge your jet ski battery. It may give it a surface charge but nothing lasting.

    Jet skis use a stator and not an alternator like your car.

    A stator only maintains a charge and does not fully charge as an alternator would.

    8 thoughts on “The Best Jet Ski Battery Charger – Voltage, Amps, and Tips You Need”

    Great advice on battery and charger. I am looking at purchasing our first jetski, Seadoo gti 130. This website has been invaluable to supply the information I need. Thanks very much Reply

    Hi. Picked up the 2 amps NOCO charger and noticed the battery says charge at 1.8 amps. Will the extra charge amperage cause any issues? The same store also had a 1 amp NOCO available. Thanks. Reply

    It’s fine. I’ve never seen a 12-volt lead acid battery be that specific about charging amps (except maybe for computer power supplies, but not automotive), they usually round up to 2 amps. The biggest thing is that you don’t want to go over 2 amps, so avoid the 2.5, 3, 4, etc. amp chargers. Also, make sure it’s a Smart charger, the ones that turn on and off as needed. Reply

    Hey Steve I’ve just ordered a new GTX230 and will be keeping it on a Jetski Pod at a marina with a cover on it between rides, so no ability to have a Smart charger hooked up. A little confused by your battery charging advice in that; on the one hand you say the battery needs to be on a charger if you’re not riding the ski for more than 3 months (winter). So I’m guessing it will be fine if I’m riding the ski at least once a month year round, but then you go on to say that riding the ski won’t change it up because it runs on a stator not an alternator? So does this mean whether you ride it or not, it will still need to be charged up every three months? Maybe I’ve misunderstood you, can you please clarify. PS Yeah, we can ride year round in Oz no snow here. Our winters are just less hot than our summers Cheers Steve Reply

    It’s more about keeping the battery active than charging it. When you ride your jet ski it’s keeping the battery active with the stator and so does putting it on a battery charger. A stator will charge a battery but it’s more of a side effect of maintaining the charge. If you’re not keeping the battery active the internal plates sulfate and cause it to die, this takes months to happen. Charging a dead lead acid battery will sometimes loosen the sulfation and allow the battery to charge again but if you ride it more or keep it on a Smart charger the plates won’t sulfate. If the sulfation is too much the battery won’t recover when using a battery charger. This is why I like the solar battery chargers as they supply just enough power to keep the battery active, they don’t even need to be in direct sunlight. So if you’re riding your jet ski often, once a month is fine, you don’t need to charge the battery as you’re keeping it active. But if you go the whole winter without running the jet ski or keeping the battery on charge you run the risk of the battery being dead because it sulfated too much and the battery charger might not be able to “smack it back to life”. Reply

    What Does a Battery Maintainer Do?

    Are you wondering how to properly store your RV or boat? Do you have a vehicle that will be sitting for a while? If the answer is yes to either of these questions, a battery maintainer might be an essential tool to keep in your storage tool kit.

    But what does a battery maintainer do exactly? Keep reading to learn when to use a battery maintainer, its advantages and disadvantages, and how to choose the best one for you.

    What Is a Battery Maintainer?

    A battery maintainer is essentially a small battery charger that sends small amounts of energy to your battery. Doing so lets the battery sit for long periods of time without any activity and lets the battery retain a full charge. They can also help extend the life of your battery by preventing damage to your battery.

    The battery maintainer sends a trickle charge to your battery and can sense when it’s fully charged. At this point, it shuts off to avoid overcharging the battery, making it perfect to use when your batteries will be sitting for awhile without any use.

    Battery maintainers can be a device that plugs into the wall or can work with a small solar panel.

    When Should I Use a Maintainer?

    Most of the time battery maintainers are used on starting batteries for engines. Because these batteries do not charge unless the engine is running, they need a maintenance charge, hence the name.

    If you have any type of vehicle sitting for two months or longer, a battery maintainer will help keep your battery charged, that way, you can instantly start your car, truck, van, or motorhome when the time comes.

    But why does the battery die when you aren’t using it? It’s because of something called parasitic drain and self-discharge. Anything connected to the battery, such as a vehicle’s computer and its electronics, will use a tiny amount of charge. While very slight, this small amount of energy can completely drain your battery over time.

    In addition, batteries have what’s called self-discharge. Due to the chemical nature of the battery, batteries lose stored energy over time, even with nothing connected to them. This problem is much greater with lead-acid batteries than lithium, however, and why a battery maintainer is critical on a lead-acid battery.

    What’s the Difference Between a Battery Charger and Battery Maintainer?

    You might be asking yourself, “Can’t I just use a battery charger? What’s the difference between the two?”

    A normal battery charger does not stop sending voltage to a battery regardless of its state of charge. For some batteries, this can be detrimental to the battery over long periods of time. Some battery chargers have a Smart mode that senses storage and will lower the voltage or shut off like a maintainer.

    On the other hand, battery maintainers shut off once the battery reaches its complete charge. When the battery starts draining again, the maintainer will kick back on, making it ideal for long periods of use.

    What Are the Advantages of a Maintainer?

    Given what we’ve discussed so far, the advantages of a battery maintainer are pretty obvious–they keep your battery safely topped off so you can hit the road (or water) whenever your heart desires.

    They’ll also extend your battery life by keeping it from dying for good during cold spells. And luckily, they’re meant for long-term use, giving you extra peace of mind while your vehicle or boat sits.

    Overall a small battery maintainer is much more cost-effective than a full-size charging system just for keeping a battery topped off.

    What Are the Disadvantages?

    Battery maintainers are fantastic for many reasons, but, of course, they have their downsides as well. For instance, you might not need one at all. If you’ll be driving your vehicle for at least 30 mins once a month, you can probably avoid the unnecessary expense and go without.

    Battery maintainers are not chargers and should not be used if the vehicle has any significant loads on it. Make sure all electronics and lights are off or the battery maintainer may not do its job and you will still end up with a dead battery.

    Is It Safe to Leave a Battery Maintainer on All the Time?

    So, can you really leave your battery maintainer on all the time? Fortunately, the answer is yes! Battery maintainers are designed for constant and long-term use. When used correctly, they should be perfectly safe to use as long as you need.

    It’s not a bad idea to check the maintainer every once in a while. While it shouldn’t cause any harm to your batteries, it could short out at some point. Every month or so, just check in to make sure the maintainer is still kicking.

    Do They Work with Lithium-Ion Batteries?

    It depends. If you’re using a high-quality battery like our line of Battle Born Batteries that have their own built-in BMS, then a battery maintainer will keep it charged. It is likely that it will not keep it completely full, however, if the maintainer is specifically designed for lead-acid.

    If, however, you are using a lithium battery without a BMS, then do not try and connect a battery maintainer as it could cause an unsafe scenario.

    Thankfully, most lithium batteries don’t need battery maintainers, so this isn’t something you need to worry about. Lithium batteries have a much lower self-discharge rate and, if disconnected, will not go dead even when in storage.

    → Click here to learn more about Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    How to Choose a Battery Maintainer

    The main factor you should consider when choosing a battery maintainer is your battery’s voltage. Find a maintainer that will properly charge your specific battery.

    For example, the 1.25A 12V battery charger and maintainer by Battery Tender is a popular model. It can charge most power sport vehicles but doesn’t have the power to charge a car battery.

    There are also battery maintainers that can charge multiple batteries at once. If you have more than one battery in the same or different vehicles, you might consider one of these.

    Are Battery Maintainers Worth It?

    Whether or not a battery maintainer is worth the expense ultimately depends on your need for one. After all, they serve a specific purpose–to keep your batteries safely charged over a long period of time.

    If you have a vehicle or boat that’ll be sitting for months on end, the answer is yes; it’s absolutely worth it to have a battery maintainer for starting batteries. You’ll have the peace of mind that your battery is safely charged, and you won’t have to buy new batteries as often!

    If however, you have a bank of lithium batteries for house power, then a battery maintainer is not the best option. Storing them charged and disconnected is your best bet.

    What do you think? Are battery maintainers worth it? Let us know in the Комментарии и мнения владельцев below!

    Will a 5W Solar Panel Charge a 12V Battery?

    Just so you know, this page contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase after clicking on one, at no extra cost to you I may earn a small commission.

    Yes, a 5W solar panel can charge a 12V battery.

    In fact, I recently did it myself:

    Then, after doing it, I saw that Google isn’t exactly giving the best answer to this question:

    And I decided to write this article to set the record straight.

    So, once again, for the people in the back:

    Yes, you can charge a 12V battery with a 5W solar panel. You just need to make sure it’s a 12V solar panel. Anything less, such as a 6V or 9V solar panel, won’t work.

    solvao, solar, trickle, charger, battery

    Materials Tools

    Materials

    • Newpowa 5W 12V solar panel
    • 12V PWM solar charge controller
    • 12V battery (I used a 12V 33Ah battery)
    • Wires, connectors, and fuses (I used the NOCO GC018)

    Tools

    • Wire cutter
    • Wire stripper
    • Screwdriver

    Step 1: Connect the 12V Battery to the Solar Charge Controller

    Connecting a battery to a solar charge controller requires wires, wire connectors, and an inline fuse.

    You can use your own wire and connectors, or you can buy some to make the process a little easier. I ended up buying something called the NOCO GC018. It’s a 12V plug adapter that comes with an inline fuse and ring terminals — the right kind for my 12V battery.

    To start, I cut the 12V plug off the NOCO GC018 with my wire cutter.

    Then I just pulled the wires apart a little bit and stripped the ends. (I’ll be sticking the stripped ends in the charge controller’s terminals.)

    Now my wires are ready. I can connect them to the battery terminals using the ring terminals. And I can connect them to the charge controller terminals using a screwdriver.

    I first connected the positive and negative wires to their respective battery terminals. Like so:

    Then I used a screwdriver (a precision screwdriver, in my case) to connect the stripped wire ends to the charge controller’s battery terminals. My controller’s terminals have a battery icon on them, as well as a plus and minus, to help me know where each wire goes.

    When all the wires were connected, my charge controller turned on to indicate that it was properly connected to the 12V battery.

    Consult your charge controller’s manual for instructions on how to program it for your battery type. Mine defaults to sealed lead acid batteries, which is the battery type I was using.

    Step 2: Connect the 5W Solar Panel to the Solar Charge Controller

    My 5W solar panel came with wires that had stripped ends. This made it simple to connect it to my charge controller.

    I simply connected the positive and negative solar wires to their respective terminals on my charge controller. Once again, the terminals have a solar panel icon on them and are marked for positive and negative which makes it easy.

    Now your solar panel is connected…

    Here’s how mine turned out:

    That’s really all there is to it.

    However, because my solar panel was inside, at this point it wasn’t getting enough sunlight to actually charge the battery.

    Step 3: Test Your 5W Solar 12V Battery Charger

    You’ve effectively just built a 5W solar 12V battery charger. Not bad!

    To test mine, I took everything outside (making sure no wires got disconnected in the process) and put the solar panel in direct sunlight.

    I then cycled through the system specs on my charge controller until I got to the PV current display.

    It indicated that my 5W solar panel was charging my 12V battery at a rate of 0.2 amps:

    There you go — proof that a 5W solar panel can charge a 12V battery.

    I can now just leave my charging setup outside in direct sunlight. The panel will continue to charge the battery as I go about my day.

    The charge controller has overcharge protection, meaning it will stop the charging once the battery is full.

    W Solar 12V Battery Charger Wiring Diagram

    Here’s the circuit diagram for using a 5W solar panel to charge a 12V battery:

    And here’s what I call the “real-world wiring diagram”, which shows what it looks like in real life:

    Notes about this wiring diagram:

    • Safety best practices are to place a fuse between the charge controller and both battery and solar panel. (However, for this project, because my solar panel is so small, I left out the fuse between the solar panel and charge controller.)
    • For most charge controllers, you connect the battery first and then the solar panel. Consult your controller’s manual for the manufacturer’s recommended connection order.
    • Make sure to get a 12V 5W solar panel. If it is a lower voltage 5W panel (like 6V or 9V) it won’t work with a 12V charge controller.
    • Make sure your charge controller is compatible with your battery’s chemistry. For example, some charge controllers only work with lead acid batteries. Others work with lead acid and lithium batteries.
    • I recommend a PWM charge controller for this project because they’re cheap, and because the PV voltage likely won’t get high enough for an MPPT charge controller. For an MPPT controller to work, the PV voltage usually has to be 4 or 5 volts above the battery voltage.

    Tip: This circuit diagram would work for many other solar panel sizes (e.g. 10W, 20W, 50W, 80W, 100W) as long as it’s a 12V solar panel and you use the appropriate wire gauge and fuse size for the current.

    How Long Does It Take to Charge a 12V Battery with a 5W Solar Panel?

    According to our solar panel charge time calculator, it takes around 107.3 peak sun hours for a 5W solar panel to fully charge a 50Ah 12V lead acid battery using a PWM charge controller.

    And here are the estimated charge times for 5 other common solar panel sizes:

    • 10W solar panel: 54.1 peak sun hours
    • 20W solar panel: 27.6 peak sun hours
    • 50W solar panel: 11.6 peak sun hours
    • 80W solar panel: 7.6 peak sun hours
    • 100W solar panel: 6.3 peak sun hours

    Of course, these estimated charge times vary depending on factors such as battery capacity and battery type.

    What Size Solar Panel Do You Need to Charge a 12V Battery?

    You can charge a 12V battery with many different solar panel sizes.

    Knowing this, the question then becomes:

    “How fast do I want to solar charge my 12V battery?”

    Based on the above charge times, we can draw some conclusions:

    5W and 10W solar panels are good for slow, trickle charging 12V batteries. They’re a good size solar panel for maintaining a 12V battery’s charge, and will slowly charge it up over the course of weeks — maybe even months depending on the weather and size of the battery.

    20W and 50W solar panels are good for fast charging small 12V batteries. For example, a 20W solar panel can charge a 20Ah 12V battery in around 17 hours of direct sunlight. A 50W panel can do it in around 8 hours.

    80W and 100W solar panels are good for fast charging large 12V and car batteries. If it’s a 50Ah battery, they can fully charge it in around 12 hours or less of direct sunlight.

    For more help on finding the right size solar panel for your solar charging setup, check out my post on what size solar panel will charge a 12V battery quickly.

    Tip: You can reduce these charge times further by upgrading from a PWM to an MPPT charge controller. MPPT charge controllers are much more efficient, but they’re also much more expensive.

    DIY Solar Charging Projects You Can Build Now

    Like I said, you just built a solar 12V battery charger.

    You connected a solar panel to a battery via a charge controller. And the solar panel is now charging that battery.

    Using what you just learned, you can build even more solar chargers.

    Here are some ideas for your next project:

    DIY Solar Car Battery Charger

    Car batteries are also 12V batteries. So, using the same solar panel and charge controller, I was able to make a solar car battery charger.

    Solar Ebike Battery Charger

    You’re also just a few parts away from solar charging an electric bike. Don’t be fooled by how complex it looks — you just need a bigger solar panel and a small inverter.

    Will a 5W Solar Panel Charge a 12V Battery?

    Just so you know, this page contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase after clicking on one, at no extra cost to you I may earn a small commission.

    Yes, a 5W solar panel can charge a 12V battery.

    In fact, I recently did it myself:

    Then, after doing it, I saw that Google isn’t exactly giving the best answer to this question:

    And I decided to write this article to set the record straight.

    So, once again, for the people in the back:

    Yes, you can charge a 12V battery with a 5W solar panel. You just need to make sure it’s a 12V solar panel. Anything less, such as a 6V or 9V solar panel, won’t work.

    Materials Tools

    Materials

    • Newpowa 5W 12V solar panel
    • 12V PWM solar charge controller
    • 12V battery (I used a 12V 33Ah battery)
    • Wires, connectors, and fuses (I used the NOCO GC018)

    Tools

    • Wire cutter
    • Wire stripper
    • Screwdriver

    Step 1: Connect the 12V Battery to the Solar Charge Controller

    Connecting a battery to a solar charge controller requires wires, wire connectors, and an inline fuse.

    You can use your own wire and connectors, or you can buy some to make the process a little easier. I ended up buying something called the NOCO GC018. It’s a 12V plug adapter that comes with an inline fuse and ring terminals — the right kind for my 12V battery.

    To start, I cut the 12V plug off the NOCO GC018 with my wire cutter.

    Then I just pulled the wires apart a little bit and stripped the ends. (I’ll be sticking the stripped ends in the charge controller’s terminals.)

    Now my wires are ready. I can connect them to the battery terminals using the ring terminals. And I can connect them to the charge controller terminals using a screwdriver.

    I first connected the positive and negative wires to their respective battery terminals. Like so:

    Then I used a screwdriver (a precision screwdriver, in my case) to connect the stripped wire ends to the charge controller’s battery terminals. My controller’s terminals have a battery icon on them, as well as a plus and minus, to help me know where each wire goes.

    When all the wires were connected, my charge controller turned on to indicate that it was properly connected to the 12V battery.

    Consult your charge controller’s manual for instructions on how to program it for your battery type. Mine defaults to sealed lead acid batteries, which is the battery type I was using.

    Step 2: Connect the 5W Solar Panel to the Solar Charge Controller

    My 5W solar panel came with wires that had stripped ends. This made it simple to connect it to my charge controller.

    I simply connected the positive and negative solar wires to their respective terminals on my charge controller. Once again, the terminals have a solar panel icon on them and are marked for positive and negative which makes it easy.

    Now your solar panel is connected…

    Here’s how mine turned out:

    That’s really all there is to it.

    However, because my solar panel was inside, at this point it wasn’t getting enough sunlight to actually charge the battery.

    Step 3: Test Your 5W Solar 12V Battery Charger

    You’ve effectively just built a 5W solar 12V battery charger. Not bad!

    To test mine, I took everything outside (making sure no wires got disconnected in the process) and put the solar panel in direct sunlight.

    I then cycled through the system specs on my charge controller until I got to the PV current display.

    It indicated that my 5W solar panel was charging my 12V battery at a rate of 0.2 amps:

    There you go — proof that a 5W solar panel can charge a 12V battery.

    I can now just leave my charging setup outside in direct sunlight. The panel will continue to charge the battery as I go about my day.

    The charge controller has overcharge protection, meaning it will stop the charging once the battery is full.

    W Solar 12V Battery Charger Wiring Diagram

    Here’s the circuit diagram for using a 5W solar panel to charge a 12V battery:

    And here’s what I call the “real-world wiring diagram”, which shows what it looks like in real life:

    Notes about this wiring diagram:

    • Safety best practices are to place a fuse between the charge controller and both battery and solar panel. (However, for this project, because my solar panel is so small, I left out the fuse between the solar panel and charge controller.)
    • For most charge controllers, you connect the battery first and then the solar panel. Consult your controller’s manual for the manufacturer’s recommended connection order.
    • Make sure to get a 12V 5W solar panel. If it is a lower voltage 5W panel (like 6V or 9V) it won’t work with a 12V charge controller.
    • Make sure your charge controller is compatible with your battery’s chemistry. For example, some charge controllers only work with lead acid batteries. Others work with lead acid and lithium batteries.
    • I recommend a PWM charge controller for this project because they’re cheap, and because the PV voltage likely won’t get high enough for an MPPT charge controller. For an MPPT controller to work, the PV voltage usually has to be 4 or 5 volts above the battery voltage.

    Tip: This circuit diagram would work for many other solar panel sizes (e.g. 10W, 20W, 50W, 80W, 100W) as long as it’s a 12V solar panel and you use the appropriate wire gauge and fuse size for the current.

    How Long Does It Take to Charge a 12V Battery with a 5W Solar Panel?

    According to our solar panel charge time calculator, it takes around 107.3 peak sun hours for a 5W solar panel to fully charge a 50Ah 12V lead acid battery using a PWM charge controller.

    And here are the estimated charge times for 5 other common solar panel sizes:

    • 10W solar panel: 54.1 peak sun hours
    • 20W solar panel: 27.6 peak sun hours
    • 50W solar panel: 11.6 peak sun hours
    • 80W solar panel: 7.6 peak sun hours
    • 100W solar panel: 6.3 peak sun hours

    Of course, these estimated charge times vary depending on factors such as battery capacity and battery type.

    What Size Solar Panel Do You Need to Charge a 12V Battery?

    You can charge a 12V battery with many different solar panel sizes.

    Knowing this, the question then becomes:

    “How fast do I want to solar charge my 12V battery?”

    Based on the above charge times, we can draw some conclusions:

    5W and 10W solar panels are good for slow, trickle charging 12V batteries. They’re a good size solar panel for maintaining a 12V battery’s charge, and will slowly charge it up over the course of weeks — maybe even months depending on the weather and size of the battery.

    20W and 50W solar panels are good for fast charging small 12V batteries. For example, a 20W solar panel can charge a 20Ah 12V battery in around 17 hours of direct sunlight. A 50W panel can do it in around 8 hours.

    80W and 100W solar panels are good for fast charging large 12V and car batteries. If it’s a 50Ah battery, they can fully charge it in around 12 hours or less of direct sunlight.

    For more help on finding the right size solar panel for your solar charging setup, check out my post on what size solar panel will charge a 12V battery quickly.

    Tip: You can reduce these charge times further by upgrading from a PWM to an MPPT charge controller. MPPT charge controllers are much more efficient, but they’re also much more expensive.

    DIY Solar Charging Projects You Can Build Now

    Like I said, you just built a solar 12V battery charger.

    You connected a solar panel to a battery via a charge controller. And the solar panel is now charging that battery.

    Using what you just learned, you can build even more solar chargers.

    Here are some ideas for your next project:

    DIY Solar Car Battery Charger

    Car batteries are also 12V batteries. So, using the same solar panel and charge controller, I was able to make a solar car battery charger.

    Solar Ebike Battery Charger

    You’re also just a few parts away from solar charging an electric bike. Don’t be fooled by how complex it looks — you just need a bigger solar panel and a small inverter.

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