Skip to content
Pure sine wave Inverter Combined charger & MPPT solar controller 230V/50Hz…

Pure sine wave Inverter Combined charger & MPPT solar controller 230V/50Hz…

    Pure sine wave Inverter Combined charger MPPT solar controller 230V/50Hz, 800-4000W

    HSP series MAGNIZON POWER inverter/charger with duel operational modes with built in MPPT solar charge controller minimizes the hassles of solar installation especially in hybrid environments. Large LCD display with functional keys to select various parameters and displays real time information along with operational schemes. Day time will be supported through solar panels and night time or rainy days will be with batteries and Utility power with intelligent microprocessor based automatic switching. Reliable transformer less IGBT based design and frequency controlled powers very much compatible to all varieties of loads: resistive/inductive loads such as refrigerators, motors, pumps, compressors and laser printers as well as electronic loads like TV’s, Computers, power tool and battery chargers. Smart micro controller based 3-stage built in charging system properly charge and maintain battery bank in the obscene of solar power or rainy days. The charge rate is selectable so you can use a variety of battery sizes and types to fit your back up time requirements.

    Features

    • 12V/24V/48V DC or 230V AC input; 230V, 50 Hz output (hardwired)
    • 800/1600/2400/3200/4000 watts continuous output with double boost capacity.
    • Microprocessor controlled Smart volume design
    • Built in power management software and communication cable with the unit
    • Dry contact communications system for remote management SCADA applications
    • Built in MPPT solar charge controller Utility based charger
    • Duel Operational Mode UPS/ Solar Inverter Mode
    • Robust design for Hybrid configuration Pure sine wave output
    • High Efficiency Using Line-Interactive Circuit Topology(Full Bridge Topology)
    • Quiet, high efficiency operation, high surge capacity and low idle current
    • CE Safety
    • Selectable input voltage range and frequency according to city power in your country
    • Charging current is settable according to your battery type
    • Configurable AC/Solar input priority via LCD setting
    • Compatible to mains voltage or generator power
    • Auto restart while AC is recovering
    • Overload, over temperature and short circuit protection
    • Smart charging system optimizes battery performance
    • Cold start function
    • Parallel capability up to 4 units which available on HSP4048SW-LCD HSP5048SW-LCD only
    pure, sine, wave, inverter, combined

    Applications

    • Well designed for hybrid applications where solar energy systems connected along with grid or generator sets.
    • Versatile inverter/charger with pure sine wave system with seamless transfer switching serves as an automotive inverter for RVs, trucks, standalone alternative power source with high end back up times with various battery technologies(VRLA, GEL, Deep cycle, Ni-Cd and many more)
    • Perfectly suitable for On-grid, Off-grid and Hybrid applications.
    • Telecom and ATM applications.
    • Small PV plants for houses/villas and small offices.
    • Remote closets and small computer room applications.
    • Mining, fluid flow management, Oil gas applications.

    HSP1024SW-LCD

    HSP2024SW-LCD

    HSP3024SW-LCD

    HSP4048SW-LCD

    HSP5048SW-LCD

    90V AC /- 7V (Appliances mode)

    100V AC /- 7V (Appliances mode)

    Line Mode: Circuit Breaker

    Battery Mode: Electronic Circuits

    pure, sine, wave, inverter, combined

    5sec @150% load; 10sec@110~150% load

    Charge Mode Specs

    Solar Charging Mode Specs

    General Specs

    5% to 95% Relative Humidity (non-condensing)

    RS232 Cable along with monitoring software included

    Yes. Ability to monitor Power OFF/On, LOW DC, Battery voltage, charge status etc

    pure, sine, wave, inverter, combined

    Description

    HSP series MAGNIZON POWER inverter/charger with duel operational modes with built in MPPT solar charge controller minimizes the hassles of solar installation especially in hybrid environments. Large LCD display with functional keys to select various parameters and displays real time information along with operational schemes. Day time will be supported through solar panels and night time or rainy days will be with batteries and Utility power with intelligent microprocessor based automatic switching. Reliable transformer less IGBT based design and frequency controlled powers very much compatible to all varieties of loads: resistive/inductive loads such as refrigerators, motors, pumps, compressors and laser printers as well as electronic loads like TV’s, Computers, power tool and battery chargers. Smart micro controller based 3-stage built in charging system properly charge and maintain battery bank in the obscene of solar power or rainy days. The charge rate is selectable so you can use a variety of battery sizes and types to fit your back up time requirements.

    Solar controller and inverter

    Charge Controller Types: PWM Vs MPPT

    ​If you want to charge batteries, then you’re going to need a charge controller. A charge controller will control the power input to the batteries when they’re charging, and will turn off or divert the power input when the batteries are fully charged to protect them from damage.

    There are two main types of charge controller: pulse width modulation controllers (PWM), and maximum power point tracking controllers (MPPT)

    PWM controllers were among the first introduced to the market years ago and are still common today. They are the simpler and more affordable controller type, but they’re also less efficient compared to MPPT (~80% for PWM versus ~98% for MPPT). PWM controllers are basically switches that rapidly connect and disconnect a power source to and from the batteries to optimize charge and regulate voltage. These controllers are usually designed for charging 12, 24, or 48 V battery banks, and will drag the voltage of the power source down to the voltage of the battery bank that it’s connected to, if required. But there’s a loss of power as a result.

    ​For example, a standard 32-36 cell, 100-150 watt solar pv panel will output somewhere between 17-19 open circuit volts, which is ideal for charging a 12 V battery (the charging voltage will always need to be a few volts higher than the battery bank voltage at full state of charge. see chart below).

    In this scenario, a PWM controller won’t need to drag the charge voltage down to suit the battery voltage. However a 60 cell, 300 watt panel will output around 33 open circuit volts. A person ‘could’ connect this panel to a 12 V battery via a PWM controller as long as the controller is rated to handle the higher input voltage, but the controller would just drag the voltage down from 33 V to around 17-18 V to suit the battery, which means that nearly half of the power from the panel will be lost. So when using a PWM controller in your system, you’ll need to make sure that the open circuit voltage rating of the panels (and the array as a whole) and the voltage rating of the controller is suitable for the battery bank voltage in order to minimize losses and prevent damaging the controller. ​

    As mentioned previously, MPPT controllers are more expensive but more efficient than PWM controllers. Maximum power point tracking controllers are intelligent controllers that use an algorithm that constantly measures the power coming from a solar array or wind turbine, and adjusts the charge voltage and current to suit the batteries and optimize efficiency. MPPT controllers are designed for charging 12, 24, or 48V battery banks, but they’re also designed to allow a high input voltage from the power source, usually up to 200 V but this will differ between manufacturers. ​Unlike a PWM controller, there’s no or very little loss in power when an MPPT controller lowers input voltage to match battery voltage because it will increase the current (amps) to compensate and allow the same power to the batteries (volts x amps = watts). This helps with array design/configuration, because multiple larger panels can be connected in series before the controller to increase voltage and minimize wiring requirements. If the panels need to be connected in parallel to keep the voltage low and matching the batteries, then that increases the current (amps) x the # of panels instead of the voltage, and subsequently the required gauge for the transmission wires will also need to increase in order to minimize resistance and carry the current safely, which will increase the cost of an installation. This is why most large off grid installations done today are utilizing large panels and MPPT controllers. This controller may be more expensive, but thanks to its efficiency there are cost savings to be had.

    Diversion Controllers

    PWM and MPPT controllers are both available for solar, wind, or hydro power applications. However, controllers for wind and hydro systems differ from controllers for solar PV systems. A solar charge controller is the standard type, and simply limits or completely cuts off power input to the batteries when they’re charged. Because solar panels have no moving parts, this is no cause for concern.

    If a wind turbine were connected to a standard solar charge controller, then when the controller begins to limit or cut off power to the batteries, the wind turbine will become ‘unloaded’ and the blades can spin out of control, known as free wheeling. Not only is this dangerous for any bystanders, it also causes excess wear on bearings, speeds up edge erosion on the blades, and puts the generator at risk of burning itself out. The same is true when it comes to hydro generators.

    To prevent free wheeling, a wind or hydro power specific controller needs to be used. These are called diversion or dump controllers. They’re designed so that when the battery bank is completely charged and the controller goes into float mode, excess power from the turbine is diverted to a dump load to keep it operating under a load at all times while keeping the batteries from being overcharged. When the battery bank voltage begins to drop below a user set point, the controller will automatically switch the power supply back to the batteries again. A dump load can be anything from another bank of batteries to a bank of resistors or water heating elements. anything that matches the battery bank voltage and slightly more than the total wattage of the incoming power supply, ~ 20%. Refer to the controller manufacturer’s instructions for connecting a dump load to their equipment.

    Charging Modes

    Your charge controller will operate in one of three charging modes; boost charge, float charge, and equalization charge.

    Boost charge is just as it sounds. This charging mode allows the maximum amount of power possible to the batteries without damaging them, in order to bring them up to a full state of charge (SOC) as soon as possible.

    Float charge occurs when your battery bank is fully charged, but the controller lowers the charging voltage and current to a small trickle charge just to compensate for the banks natural discharge and keep it topped up.

    Equalization charge will occur for a short period once per month, and is sometimes programmable in the controller. This mode will slightly overcharge the batteries for a short period to desulphate the plates and help balance out the SOC of each battery in the bank. This helps to improve the health of the battery bank and prolong its life.

    Sizing A PWM Charge Controller

    Sizing a PWM controller is relatively simple. For example, a person wants to power an aeration system for a fish pond. The power supply is a 1000 watt solar PV array, the storage is a 12 V battery bank, and they want to use a PWM controller because it’s just a small system which doesn’t require or justify an expensive MPPT controller.

    Because the battery bank is only 12 V and the PWM controller will limit input power to just a few volts above the battery’s full SOC level (ie: 17-19 V), the panels should have an open circuit voltage rating that matches the battery bank to minimize losses. Looking over some manufacturer spec’s, a 100 watt panel produces 17-19 V open circuit, so if ten of them were connected in parallel then that would amount to 1000 watts while staying within the charging voltage range of the battery bank.

    The next thing to figure out is how much current will be delivered to the charge controller/battery bank. If the input voltage is 17 V and the total power is 1000 watts, then the current would be watts divided by volts: 1000 / 17 = 58.8 amps

    At times, the sun can deliver much more energy than the 1000 watts per square meter conditions that solar panels are tested in and rated for, so it’s always best to oversize the charge controller by around 20-25% to prevent damage from potential power surges. For the example above: 59 amps x 1.25 = 73.8 amps. So a PWM controller rated for 12 V and at least 74 amps is needed. It’s highly unlikely that a 74 amp charge controller exists, but there are 80 amp charge controllers. If one can’t be sourced affordably, then the PV array can be split into two separate systems, and two 12 V, 40 amp PWM charge controllers can be used to charge the battery bank instead of the one 80 amp controller.

    Sizing An MPPT Charge Controller

    As mentioned previously, MPPT controllers can accept a high input voltage and convert it down to the appropriate charge voltage for the battery bank without loosing power by substituting with more current (volts x amps = watts). Because of this, there are two voltage ratings that you need to consider when sizing an MPPT controller; the input voltage rating and the charge voltage rating. The input voltage rating should match the voltage coming in from the power source, 25% to compensate for voltage spikes on cold, sunny days. So if there will be 66 V total coming in from two 300 W panels connected in series (based on the manufacturer’s power rating), then the controller should be able to handle at least 66 x 1.25 = ~83 volts. Most MPPT controllers can handle between 100-200 V, but it’s important to check the rating and be sure. The charge voltage will be either 12, 24, or 48 V. some controllers can handle all and will auto-select the appropriate charge voltage when connected to the battery bank.

    The next thing you need to determine is the boost current. The boost current is the total amps that will be delivered to the battery after the controller adjusts the voltage from the power source. The boost current will almost always be higher than the current coming from a high voltage power source. For example, if you connected two 33 V/300 W panels in series, the result would be 600 W at 66 V. The current would be 600 divided by 66 = ~9 amps. If those panels are connected to an MPPT controller with a 100 V input rating to charge a 12 V battery, then in order to deliver the same or close to the 600 W coming from the panels after dropping the charge voltage to suit the battery, the controller has to increase the current from 9 amps to around: 600 / 12 = 50 amps. Remember to add another 25% to account for power surges on cold, sunny days when the panels are likely to operate more efficiently. 50 x 1.25 = 62.5 amps. So the boost current is around 63 amps, which means a 70 or 80 amp controller would suffice. Always remember that the boost current is what an MPPT controller’s amp rating will be based on. If a person were to try to connect a 10 amp controller to the same array and charge a 12 V battery, then the controller would likely burn out before they finish their morning coffee the day after installation is complete. To find your boost current, just divide the total power of your array or turbine in watts by the voltage of your battery (bank), then multiply by 1.25 to increase the result by 25%.

    Power Inverter Types: Modified Vs Pure Sine Wave

    A power inverter converts direct current (DC) into household alternating current (AC). Until the past decade or so, the modified sine wave inverter was the most common (and simplest) type. The earliest version accomplished the conversion by adjusting the voltage straight up and down, which results in a square sine wave signal. Later version made the adjustments in smaller increments in an attempt to smooth out the curve. It works fine for powering anything that doesn’t have delicate electronics like a computer, battery charger, or digital devices. Things like radios, brushed motors, old tube TVs and incandescent lights will run fine on modified sine wave. Some modern appliances might seem to work fine, but will consume much more power and run hotter than normal, which will decrease lifespan and increase the risk of an electrical fire. So a person has to take care with what they operate from a modified sine wave inverter. These inverters aren’t suitable for general household use, in most cases. The alternative to a modified sine wave inverter is a pure sine wave inverter. These are generally more expensive, but they produce a much smoother sine wave signal which can operate delicate electronics more efficiently (25-30%) and without risk of damaging them, as long as the inverter is sized properly, of course. Despite their price, pure sine wave inverters have become the more popular choice these days simply because they’re the most versatile.

    Solar Power Inverter For Home 12000 Watt 48V to 120V 240V w/ 120A MPPT Controller

    Model #: M12048D This M12048D solar power inverter for home is a 12KW transformer based power inverter, 100A utility battery charger, 120A MPPT solar charger and 80A transfer switch.

    Off Grid Solar Inverter 12000 Watt 48V to 120V 240V w/ 120A MPPT Controller

    This 12,000 watt solar inverter is an integration of a 48V to 120/240V 12KW off grid power inverter, an 100A AC charger, 120A MPPT solar charge controller and a transfer switch. It is built with state-of-the-art inverter technology with a powerful DSP and allows users to change a wide range of specs such as AC output voltage, frequency, power priority, low/high battery cutoff, charging profiles, etc.

    FEATURES

    Pure Sine Wave AC Output 12000 Watt 120/240Vac Split Phase 36000W Power Surge for 5 Seconds 60A2 MPPT Solar Charger with PV Voc 250V BMS Port For Communicating with Compatible LiFePO4 batteries AC/Battery/PV Priority Selector Smart AC to DC Battery Charger 100 Amp 10ms Typical Transfer Time Marine Coated and Protected Remote Monitor by LCD Panel, Computer Software or APP Via Wi-Fi/GRPS Module Load Detection on Both Hotlines Automatic Generator Start

    SPECIFICATIONS

    Inverter Output Specifications: Continuous Output Power: 12000 Watts Surge Rating: 36000 Watts (5 Seconds) Output Voltage: 104/208V, 110/220V, 115/230V, 120/240Vac (Resetable) Nominal Efficiency: 91% (Peak) Line Mode Efficiency: 95% Output Frequency: 50Hz /- 0.3Hz / 60Hz /- 0.3Hz Typical Transfer Time: 10ms (Max) THD:

    DC Input Specifications: Nominal Input Voltage: 48.0Vdc/ Low Battery Cutoff: 36.0-52Vdc / 5%-50% SOC Low Battery Alarm: 38-54Vdc / Low Battery Cutoff SOC5% DC to AC Transfer: 44-54V / 5%-50% SOC AC to DC Transfer in : 44-58V / 60%-100% SOC High Voltage Cutoff: AGM:60V/FLD:62V/ USE mode: C.V4V High Voltage Recovery: 58V ———————————————- Idle Consumption: 180 Watts Power Saver Mode Idle Consumption:40 Watts

    Charger Specifications: Ac Input Voltage For Charger: Nominal 240Vac (154-260Vac) Output DC voltage: 48-58.4V AC Charger Rate: 100Amp Solar Charger Rate: 120Amp PV Voc 250V Max Combined Charge Rate: 180Amp Over Charge Protection Shutdown: 62.4V Adjustable charge current: 0-100% Four Stage Smart Charger

    Dimensions: Unit Weight: 165 lbs/75KG Unit Size L x W x H: 650380225mm/25158.9″ Shipping Weight: 184 lbs/84KG Shipping L x W x H:760540410mm/322216″

    It allows remote monitoring of the inverter system by Wi-Fi module or GPRS module on APP. There is a free Wi-Fi module packed with the solar power inverter for home.

    What is a Solar Charge Controller

    A solar charge controller manages the power going into the battery bank from the solar array. It ensures that the deep cycle batteries are not overcharged during the day, and that the power doesn’t run backwards to the solar panels overnight and drain the batteries. Some charge controllers are available with additional capabilities, like lighting and load control, but managing the power is its primary job.

    A solar charge controller is available in two different technologies, PWM and MPPT. How they perform in a system is very different from each other. An MPPT charge controller is more expensive than a PWM charge controller, and it is often worth it to pay the extra money.

    PWM Solar Charge Controller

    A PWM solar charge controller stands for “Pulse Width Modulation”. These operate by making a connection directly from the solar array to the battery bank. During bulk charging, when there is a continuous connection from the array to the battery bank, the array output voltage is ‘pulled down’ to the battery voltage. As the battery charges, the voltage of the battery rises, so the voltage output of the solar panel rises as well, using more of the solar power as it charges. As a result, you need to make sure you match the nominal voltage of the solar array with the voltage of the battery bank. Note that when we refer to a 12V solar panel, that means a panel that is designed to work with a 12V battery. The actual voltage of a 12V solar panel, when connected to a load, is close to 18 Vmp (Volts at maximum power). This is because a higher voltage source is required to charge a battery. If the battery and solar panel both started at the same voltage, the battery would not charge.

    A 12V solar panel can charge a 12V battery. A 24V solar panel or solar array (two 12V panels wired in series) is needed for a 24V battery bank, and 48V array is needed for 48V bank. If you try to charge a 12V battery with a 24V solar panel, you will be throwing over half of the panel’s power away. If you try to charge a 24V battery bank with a 12V solar panel, you will be throwing away 100% of the panel’s potential, and may actually drain the battery as well.

    MPPT Solar Charge Controller

    An MPPT solar charge controller stands for “Maximum Power Point Tracking”. It will measure the Vmp voltage of the panel, and down-converts the PV voltage to the battery voltage. Because power into the charge controller equals power out of the charge controller, when the voltage is dropped to match the battery bank, the current is raised, so you are using more of the available power from the panel. You can use a higher voltage solar array than battery, like the 60 cell nominal 20V grid-tie solar panels that are more readily available. With a 20V solar panel, you can charge a 12V battery bank, or two in series can charge up to a 24V battery bank, and three in series can charge up to a 48V battery bank. This opens up a whole wide range of solar panels that now can be used for your off-grid solar system.

    The Key Features of a Solar Charge Controller are:

    • Multistage charging of battery bank. changes the amount of power set to the batteries based on its charge level, for healthier batteries.
    • Reverse current protection. stops the solar panels from draining the batteries at night when there is no power coming from the solar panels.
    • Low voltage disconnect. turns off attached load when battery is low and turns it back on when the battery is charged back up.
    • Lighting control. turns attached light on and off based on dusk and dawn. Many controllers are configurable, allowing settings for a few hours or all night, or somewhere in between.
    • Display- may show voltage of battery bank, state of charge, amps coming in from solar panel.

    Shop for a solar charge controller among these great brands, now!

    • MPPT
    • PWM
  • MPPT
  • PWM
  • MPPT
  • PWM
  • MPPT
  • PWM
  • MPPT
  • PWM
  • MPPT
  • MPPT
  • Or, call us today at 877-878-4060 to see which solar charge controller is best for your application!

    ©1999-2023 Alternative Energy Store Inc. All Rights Reserved.

    altE 330 Codman Hill Road Boxborough, MA 01719

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *