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NAMASTE SOLAR BLOG. Tesla roof warranty

NAMASTE SOLAR BLOG. Tesla roof warranty

    The Tesla Solar Roof: Pros and Cons of Installing Solar Roof Tiles

    Tesla’s Solar Roof tiles have been creating plenty of buzz in the world of solar power, and some people want to know more about these tiles and if Namaste Solar installs them. Namaste Solar does not currently install Solar Roof tiles, but we can help you cut through some of the media hype to decide whether solar roof tiles are a good option for you. In this post we’ll look at the pros and cons of the Tesla Solar Roof for your residential solar energy system.

    Tesla Solar Roof: What You Need to Know

    Deployment of Tesla’s Solar Roof product has been slow with significant delays. According to PV Magazine, there may only be 100 Solar Roof systems connected to the grid so far, even though the product has been available for three years. The wait may be worth it for some who value the differentiating elements of the product. Other homeowners may want to start seeing the benefits of clean solar energy now, including seeing solar savings in their

    Pros of Tesla Roof Tiles

    Design: The most noticeable difference between solar panels and the Solar Roof is design. Tesla offers four different styles to choose from; textured, smooth, Tuscan, or slate styled solar roof tiles. The tiles mimic the look of a traditional roof so your neighbors won’t even know you have solar on your house (though many of our customers enjoy being solar trendsetters). If you want to maintain the aesthetics of your rooftop, the Solar Roof tiles are a great option for adding solar energy to your home.

    Warranty and durability: Tesla roof tiles are made with tempered glass that is more durable than standard roofing tiles. Tesla stands behind the durability of their product with an infinite warranty (or the lifetime of your house). We don’t know the full details of their warranty, but that’s quite a bold offer.

    Cons of Tesla Roof Tiles

    Cost: To install Tesla’s Solar Roof, you’re required to replace your whole roof – even if you don’t need a new roof right now. That means you’re paying for the cost of both a solar energy system and a new roof. According to EnergySage, on an apples-to-apples comparison: “Tesla’s solar roof will cost nearly 25,000 more than installing solar panels, and yet will only deliver 77 percent as much solar electricity (due to it being a smaller system size).

    Unknown Maintenance Costs: Since the Tesla roof tiles are a new product, the maintenance costs and processes are an unknown. If you have a roof leak, for example, how complex would it be to fix? Could you call a roofer in your area or would Tesla be the only company able to perform the fix – and how much more would that cost than a regular roof repair? There is also the question of how Tesla will deliver on the infinite warranty for required maintenance. Will the company have the financial strength and longevity to deliver on that guarantee?

    Unknown Return on Investment: When you crunch the numbers (like this Forbes contributor did), solar panels still offer a significantly higher return on investment. According to their head-to-head comparison of the Tesla Solar Roof vs. solar panels for the same house, the Tesla Solar Roof cost 48.9% more and yielded just 2.79% of the savings that the solar panels delivered. In other words, with the Solar Roof you pay almost 50% more and get 97% less in savings. Ouch.

    Are Solar Roof Tiles for You?

    The Tesla Solar Roof is an option for homeowners who are concerned about the aesthetics of their rooftop because the tiles look like a traditional rooftop. The tiles do come with a high price tag, though, and will make a Tesla Solar Roof cost prohibitive for many homeowners. Solar panels are still a reliable, tested, and durable option for homeowners who are looking for a great return on investment.

    On the Front Range and Thinking About Going Solar?

    If your home is on the Front Range in Colorado, Namaste Solar is happy to help you decide if solar is the right fit for you! Reach out to get a quote from one of our non-commissioned solar experts today.

    Recommended Reading:

    Solar Panel Warranty Guide: What You Need to Know

    Going solar is a long-term investment energy savings and a clean energy future. And there’s nothing to protect that investment like a long and robust solar panel warranty.

    In order to get the most out of your investment, it’s important to know how solar panel warranties work and what types of warranties are available.

    In this article, we’ll cover:

    Let’s dive right in by identifying the two main types of solar panel warranties.

    Types of solar panel warranties

    There are two basic types of warranties that cover solar panels.

    • A product warranty protects you from defects in a solar panel stemming from material quality or manufacturing errors. This is also referred to as an equipment or materials warranty
    • A performance warranty guarantees that a panel will maintain a certain percentage of its original power output over a period of time. This is also known as a power output warranty.

    It’s important to note that warranties vary by manufacturer, location, and panel type. We’ll provide some general information about product and performance warranties below, but it’s best to refer to the manufacturer for specifics.

    Solar panel product warranty

    Solar panel product warranties protect you from defects stemming from material quality or manufacturing errors.

    Defects covered by a product warranty are typically immediately apparent, and your installer will likely catch them before the panel is even installed. However, it may also include less visible issues like premature wear, faulty wiring, and corrosion.

    The length of a product warranty varies based on the manufacturer and model. Traditionally, these warranties typically last 10-15 years, although it is becoming more common for premium panels to have 20 and 25 year product warranties.

    If a panel fails within the warranty period, the manufacturer will typically replace or refund the panel. Some product warranties also cover the labor and shipping costs and others don’t.

    Solar panel failures are very rare. In fact, a study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) found that just 5 in 10,000 modern solar panels fail – a rate of 0.05%. However, solar panels are an investment worth protecting with a solid product warranty.

    Solar panel performance warranty

    While a product warranty protects you from defective equipment, a performance warranty ensures that solar panels maintain a certain level of output throughout their lifetime, typically 25 years.

    Like anything exposed to the elements, solar panels naturally degrade over time. As they degrade, their ability to generate electricity diminishes.

    A performance warranty guarantees a maximum level of degradation – typically between.25% and.75% – per year so that in 25 years the panel will still have 80-90% of the power output it did in its first year.

    25-year performance warranty example

    Performance warranties are important for sizing solar systems to maintain 100% offset for 25 years.

    It’s important to note that the performance warranty guarantees the panel’s ability to produce a certain amount of electricity – not that the panel will produce that amount. However, if you notice a decline in performance in a properly installed panel with adequate sunlight, your performance warranty should apply.

    Solar panel warranties by manufacturer

    As we mentioned above, product and performance warranties vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, and model to model.

    Here’s a quick glance at the warranties for some of the most popular solar panels sold through the solar.com network:

    Other solar warranties

    In addition to product and performance warranties from solar panel manufacturers, you should also be aware of installer warranties and warranties through marketplaces like solar.com.

    Installer warranties

    There are two types of installer warranties to be aware of, although not all installers offer both.

    An installer workmanship warranty covers damages and defects caused during the installation process. This ensures that your solar system is installed correctly and you won’t foot the bill for any damages done by the installers.

    Installer workmanship warranty periods can range from 10-25 years.

    An installer performance guarantee ensures that the system produces a certain amount of electricity over the warranty period. So if your system was designed to produce 8,000 kWh per year and it only produces 7,500 kWh, the installer will fix the system and/or reimburse you for the lost production.

    Installer performance guarantees can last between 5-10 years and the specifics vary by company.

    Marketplace warranty

    Finally, if you go solar through a marketplace like solar.com, you may also be covered by another layer of warranties.

    For example, solar.com offers a TriGuard Guarantee. This marketplace warranty includes:

    • A production guarantee for 90% of the kilowatt hours agreed upon in your contract
    • A 10 year installer workmanship warranty
    • A 10-year manufacturers product warranty plus a 25 year manufacturers minimum power production warranty

    There are few, if any, investments that offer this type of layered long-term protection.

    How to monitor your solar panels

    A solar panel warranty is important to have, but it won’t do much good unless you can monitor your system and identify issues.

    You may be able to identify larger issues, such as cracking, with the naked eye. But performance issues are most easily identified through a digital system monitoring app or web portal.

    Most modern solar inverters come equipt with monitoring systems for tracking your panels’ performance. Here’s a look at the interface for Enphase Enlighten – a popular monitoring system.

    As you can see, the bottom left panel on the South First Story array is performing well below its neighboring panels. This could be due to shading or dust build-up – or it could be a sign of a defect or installation error.

    Regardless, decreased production translates to a longer payback period and lower return on investment, and a real-time digital monitoring system can help you identify and resolve issues quickly.

    How to make a solar panel warranty claim

    If you notice a visible defect or performance issue with one of your solar panels, your first move is to call your installer. Do NOT handle the panel or try to fix the issue yourself, as this can void your warranty.

    Your installer will perform an onsite and/or remote inspection of the panel to diagnose of the issue. If it stems from the manufacturer, they will help you make a claim and prepare the necessary documents and photographs.

    This is why it is so important to work with established and trusted installation companies. If you have an issue with your system and the installer is unresponsive or out of business, it is much more difficult to make warranty claims.

    That’s why we require installers to have a minimum three years of experience (along with many other qualifications) to join the solar.com network.

    The bottom line

    As a long-term investment in energy savings and the ecosystem, it is crucial to protect your solar panels with robust manufacturer and installer warranties.

    Manufacturers typically offer two types of solar panel warranties: Product and performance. Together, these protect you from panel defects and ensure your panels are able to perform at a certain level throughout their life.

    Installer warranties protect you from damages and errors during the installation process.

    It’s important to have a real-time digital monitoring system to catch performance issues in your solar panels. If an issue does arise, contact your installer to identify the cause and. if necessary, prepare a warranty claim.

    Solar panel warranty FAQs

    Do solar panels void roof warranty?

    No, a quality solar installation should not void your roof warranty. In fact, some companies provide both roofing and solar installation services and provide warranties for both.

    However, it is very important to go through an experienced, reputable solar company that uses quality equipment and installation techniques. Inexperienced and careless installers can do damage that will void your roof warranty – and may not be around to clean up their mess.

    Are solar panel warranties transferable?

    In most cases, solar panel warranties are transferable to the new owner in a home sale. However, some warranties are restricted to the original owner, so it is crucial to clarify this point with the manufacturer and installer offering the warranty.

    As soon as you know you are selling your home, contact your solar installer and the solar panel manufacturer to make them aware and start the process of transferring your warranty.

    Do home warranties cover solar panels?

    If your solar panels are attached to your roof, they may be included in the dwelling coverage your homeowners insurance policy. If the panels are ground-mounted or intsalled on a detached structure (like a shed or garage), they may be included in “other structures” coverage.

    Each policy is different, so it is critical to check with your homeowners insurance provider to see if your panels can be insured. Your homeowners insurance is a great way to protect your panels for natural disasters and “Acts of God” that aren’t covered by manufacturer and installer warranties.

    If your homeowners insurance doesn’t cover your solar panels, it may be worth looking into specific solar panel insurance to protect your investment.

    SunPower Vs. Tesla Solar: Which Company Is Better?

    Here’s what we’ll cover in this solar provider comparison:

    • How do SunPower and Tesla Solar compare?
    • Which company is more expensive: SunPower Vs. Tesla Solar?
    • Does SunPower or Tesla have better warranty coverage?

    EcoWatch has helped thousands of homeowners find the best option for their own homes to go solar, saving them time, money, and headache in the process.

    Each product and or company featured here has been independently selected by the writer. You can learn more about our review methodology here. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

    Written by Dan Simms

    Dan Simms is an experienced writer with a passion for renewable energy. As a solar and EV advocate, much of his work has focused on the potential of solar power and deregulated energy, but he also writes on related topics, like real estate and economics. In his free time — when he’s not checking his own home’s solar production — he enjoys outdoor activities like hiking, mountain biking, skiing and rock climbing. Learn About This Person

    Reviewed by Melissa Smith

    Melissa is an avid writer, scuba diver, backpacker and all-around outdoor enthusiast. She graduated from the University of Florida with degrees in journalism and sustainability studies. Before joining EcoWatch, Melissa worked as the managing editor of Scuba Diving magazine and the communications manager of The Ocean Agency, a nonprofit that’s featured in the Emmy award-winning documentary Chasing Coral. Learn About This Person

    Why You Can Trust EcoWatch

    We work with a panel of solar experts to create unbiased reviews that empower you to make the right choice for your home. No other site has covered renewables as long as us, which means we have more data and insider information than other sites. Our rankings are never affected by revenue or partnerships.

    Jump to Section:

    Find the best price from solar installers in your area.

    Choosing a solar panel installation company can be a time-consuming and challenging process. There are a variety of factors to consider that can have an effect on your all-in pricing and overall experience.

    namaste, solar, blog, tesla, roof, warranty

    If you’ve been researching solar providers in your area, the likelihood is that you’ve heard of SunPower and ADT Solar, two of the largest solar installers in the U.S. However, even choosing between these two national solar panel installation companies is difficult.

    So, we’ve compiled this guide to help you decide which of these providers is best for your home solar project.

    Choosing a solar panel installation company can be a time-consuming and challenging process. There are a variety of factors to consider that can have an effect on your all-in pricing and overall experience.

    If you’ve been researching solar providers in your area, the likelihood is that you’ve heard of SunPower and ADT Solar, two of the largest solar installers in the U.S. However, even choosing between these two national solar panel installation companies is difficult.

    So, we’ve compiled this guide to help you decide which of these providers is best for your home solar project.

    Overview: SunPower Vs. Tesla

    Given the size and popularity of both SunPower and Tesla, we believe it’s important to compare these companies side by side to help you choose one for your solar panel installation.

    You’re very likely considering one or both of these providers for your solar panel system, so we think it’s important to have all the facts before you choose.

    Company Brand Is Best For Price Warranty Coverage States Served BBB Rating Payment Options Solar Services Offered
    SunPower Overall quality and system performance 25-year performance, product and workmanship warranties 50 states A Cash, loan, lease, PPA Solar panels, backup battery and EV charger installations; solar monitoring
    Tesla Solar Affordability and company reputation 25-year performance, 10-year workmanship warranties 22 states C- Cash, loan Solar panels, backup battery and EV charger installations; solar monitoring

    SunPower Overview

    SunPower has been serving the solar industry since 1985. With decades of experience and a history of providing top-of-the-line solar equipment, SunPower is an outstanding choice when installing solar on your home.

    SunPower previously manufactured solar panels but has undergone recent changes in how the company operates. Its manufacturing responsibilities now belong to its sister company, Maxeon, while SunPower focuses its efforts on its installation work. Right now, though, it still outsources a good deal of its solar projects.

    SunPower is well-known for outstanding equipment quality, as well as an industry-leading solar warranty.

    Tesla Overview

    Tesla is a massive tech company owned by Elon Musk and based in California. It got its start in the early 2000s as an electric vehicle (EV) manufacturer and then purchased SolarCity (another of Musk’s companies) in 2016. Since that acquisition, Tesla has been heavily involved in developing its renewable energy technologies.

    Tesla manufactures its own panels and offers one of the best solar batteries available for residential solar systems: the Tesla Powerwall. It also offers the Tesla Solar Roof, a futuristic, low-profile option for meeting your energy needs.

    Tesla outsources all of its installations to third parties, much like SunPower used to.

    SunPower

    Cost Comparison: SunPower Vs. Tesla

    Solar equipment is expensive no matter which company you choose for your installation. However, vary wildly among installers, so cost is a primary concern for many homeowners when choosing a solar company.

    We’ll compare the pricing of these two companies in the sections below.

    Costs and Financing Options

    SunPower manufactures some of the best panels in the business, but they come at an above-average cost. SunPower panels range from 2.85 to 3.25 per watt in most cases, while Tesla’s solar panels average around 2.50 per watt.

    Tesla also offers price matching to keep costs as low as any competitors.

    SunPower accepts all payment options, which means its products and services remain accessible to most homeowners. These options include:

    • Cash purchases
    • Loans for solar panels
    • Leases for solar panels
    • Power purchase agreements (PPAs)

    Tesla only accepts cash purchases and solar financing (loans), so its products are a bit less accessible.

    namaste, solar, blog, tesla, roof, warranty

    Which Company is Cheapest, SunPower or Tesla? – Tesla

    Tesla solar panels will almost always be more affordable than SunPower’s. Not only are its products naturally less expensive, but the company also matches the of competitors to keep your total costs down.

    However, SunPower’s panels are considered the best in the industry, so the value-to-cost ratio is still outstanding. They can help reduce your electric bills more, saving you more in the long run.

    Our Pick For Best by Cost – SunPower

    When it comes to an upfront price tag, Tesla is the winner of this category. Its products are naturally priced lower and can dip in cost due to price matching.

    However, since SunPower’s panels are more efficient and degrade more slowly, SunPower may actually provide a greater return on investment (ROI) over 25 years. A simpler way to phrase it? SunPower offers better bang for your buck.

    All in all, both companies will appeal to different customers. If balancing affordability and quality is most important, you may want to consider Tesla. If quality is your first and foremost concern, opt for SunPower.

    Warranties Offered: SunPower Vs. Tesla

    Since solar equipment is so expensive, every customer should carefully consider the included warranty coverage. Solar warranties can cover equipment damage, issues caused by poor installation and the performance of the panels. The more comprehensive the coverage, the better.

    SunPower offers one of the best warranty coverage packages available. It protects the equipment (including panels, batteries and microinverters), efficiency and workmanship, all for 25 years.

    It guarantees a minimal degradation rate for its solar inverters, panels and other clean energy equipment (see below). Most customers report that product warranty claims are easy to file and are responded to quickly.

    Tesla offers a 25-year panel performance warranty and a 10-year workmanship warranty. This pales in comparison to SunPower’s and doesn’t provide the same peace of mind.

    Our Pick For Best Warranties – SunPower

    SunPower is the clear winner in terms of warranty coverage. The company has one of the most sought-after warranty packages available for home solar systems. It’s especially great if you live in areas that experience low-sunlight conditions or extreme weather.

    Coverage Area: SunPower vs Tesla

    SunPower and Tesla both have service areas that span the entire U.S., so just about every solar customer in the country will be able to receive products or services from either of these companies.

    As mentioned above, SunPower is working on converting its business to all in-house installations. However, at the moment, both companies outsource most of their projects, with Tesla outsourcing all of them.

    Our Pick For Best Coverage Area – Tie

    SunPower and Tesla are tied when it comes to coverage area, with both companies maintaining impressive nationwide coverage.

    Solar Panel Performance: SunPower Vs. Tesla

    SunPower and Tesla are both widely revered in the industry for their highly efficient equipment that outperforms many competitors. The table below provides a side-by-side look at the panels manufactured by each company.

    If you’re looking for the best panels money can buy, SunPower solar panels are your best option. These are considered the best solar products for energy production for residential rooftop solar panel systems, and they’re backed by an industry-leading product warranty.

    Manufacturer Efficiency Warranty Length Durability Size Best For
    SunPower Panels Maxeon (the former manufacturing arm of SunPower) Ranges from 19% up to 22.7%, depending on product line 25-year performance, product and workmanship warranties High 320 watts up to 435 watts, depending on product line Customers who want maximum efficiency and performance at any cost
    Tesla Solar Panels Tesla Efficiency specs are not available 25-year performance warranty, 10-year workmanship warranty High 425 watts Customers looking for a nice blend of affordability and quality

    Tesla manufactures high-quality panels as well, although the specifications for power production aren’t made available. The company is also better known for its energy storage products, mainly the Tesla Powerwall II battery. This is one of the best solar batteries in the industry.

    Our Pick For Best Panel Performance – SunPower

    Although both of these companies install tier-one, monocrystalline solar panels that are capable of outstanding production, we have to go with SunPower for overall performance.

    SunPower’s panels are recognized as the most efficient and reliable, have performance and sustainability specs listed online and come in several size and power options suitable for most home solar projects.

    Customer Experience: SunPower Vs. Tesla

    Since SunPower and Tesla are both massive companies, most customers will understandably be concerned with the customer service that each brings to the table.

    Overall, SunPower has better reviews, backed primarily by its strong warranty coverage and quality of both equipment and workmanship.

    There are both good and bad reviews for Tesla, but it’s a bit more of a gamble as to the quality of service you’ll receive.

    With that being said, both companies outsource installations, which can lead to:

    • Poor communication with customers
    • A lack of professionalism on the part of the installer
    • Delays in installation timelines
    • Delays in connecting your system to the grid

    What Customers Say About SunPower

    SunPower maintains generally positive reviews from customers online. Many customers love how efficient the products are and how quickly the installation team can get them installed and connected to the power grid.

    Positive reviews also mention that warranty claims are usually responded to quickly and professionally.

    Of course, the company has also accrued some negative reviews, most of which seem to stem from third-party installers that provide less-than-ideal service. Some complaints include a lack of communication between SunPower and the homeowner or between SunPower and the permitting office, as well as a lack of professionalism during installation.

    Below, we’ll include some reviews for SunPower that capture the overall experience you can expect from this company.

    “The most disappointing thing was their lack of customer service. It would go weeks without getting an email back or a phone call every time I would reach out to them…I probably made 40 calls and 15 emails in the 4.5 months of trying to get the job completed.

    When they did the installation, it wasn’t complete. They had to return to fix conduit work and after asking them to paint the conduit (4-5 times) they finally did but got paint on the concrete and did a sloppy job.”

    — Sean J. via Yelp

    “SunPower was extremely knowledgeable about the system…they set up the panels, the monitoring system and helped with the setup of the monitoring app. Explaining everything from how to reach out to SunPower for support (in the event of any issues cropping up) to details about how much each panel is expected to produce, how much it is currently producing, how to maximize production per panel and also how to identify the best time of day through the year to use power to reduce reliance on the grid and cut down on electricity costs.”

    — Dennis V. via Yelp

    What Customers Say About Tesla

    Tesla also has mixed reviews, in large part because the customer experience depends on the quality of the third-party installer assigned to your project.

    Many of the positive reviews mention good communication and knowledge about the system and the process. Some customers even mention that Tesla reps have been able to assist with taking advantage of solar incentives, like the federal tax credit.

    Tesla also has many negative reviews as well. Many customers complain that the installation crew lacks professionalism and doesn’t respond to warranty claims in a timely manner. Some reviews mention poor performance of equipment which goes unfixed for weeks or, in some cases, months on end.

    Below are some reviews of Tesla Solar to give you an idea of the experience you’re likely to have.

    “Tesla had data that I could compare with the first two companies I had been considering. Tesla Energy Solar, had the statistics and details for me to ultimately negotiate the deal. Once I made my decision, the professional workmanship and wonderful customer service has been second to none. The install team really takes pride in their craft, and the communication has been first rate. I wholly recommend Tesla Energy Solar.”

    — Al H. via Yelp

    “What’s one more one-star review? Tesla’s customer service is non-existent. My Tesla solar system only worked for two days before it went down. I reported the problem and was told I would receive an email within 24hr form customer service. Then I was told 7 day, next 12 days, and finally they told me that they have no timeline. It’s been a month now and they haven’t even looked at it remotely, never mind sending someone out.”

    — Felix M. via Yelp

    Our Pick for Best Customer Experience – SunPower

    Both SunPower and Tesla come with their downsides when it comes to customer experience. Both companies outsource installations, which can lead to varying levels of professionalism and communication.

    We recommend SunPower over Tesla, as the company maintains more positive reviews. However, it only wins by a small margin.

    Final Verdict: SunPower Vs. Tesla

    Generally speaking, we recommend SunPower over Tesla.

    SunPower has some of the best equipment available, and it comes backed by a much longer and more comprehensive warranty than Tesla’s solar panels. SunPower will have a higher upfront system cost, but the quality still makes the larger investment well worth it.

    The table below provides a quick look at how these companies stack up against each other.

    Our Top Pick: SunPower

    In our opinion, SunPower is the better option between the two. The company has more positive reviews, a better warranty and offers specs for its panels that confirm they are some of the most efficient options available, making them suitable for all system sizes.

    Read Review

    Dan Simms is an experienced writer with a passion for renewable energy. As a solar and EV advocate, much of his work has focused on the potential of solar power and deregulated energy, but he also writes on related topics, like real estate and economics. In his free time — when he’s not checking his own home’s solar production — he enjoys outdoor activities like hiking, mountain biking, skiing and rock climbing.

    Melissa is an avid writer, scuba diver, backpacker and all-around outdoor enthusiast. She graduated from the University of Florida with degrees in journalism and sustainability studies. Before joining EcoWatch, Melissa worked as the managing editor of Scuba Diving magazine and the communications manager of The Ocean Agency, a nonprofit that’s featured in the Emmy award-winning documentary Chasing Coral.

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    Tesla Solar Roof Tiles: What you need to know

    Solar roof tiles from Tesla are one of the latest innovations in solar energy. Solar tiles are made out of a solar material that is designed to shingle over your roof like tiles.

    What Is a Tesla Solar Roof?

    As solar energy becomes more and more popular, homeowners are looking for new and innovative ways to harness the sun’s power. One new solar roof product that is gaining traction is the Tesla solar roof tiles. These tiles are made out of tempered glass and are highly resistant to scratches and weathering. They also have a long lifespan – they can last 20 years or more in moderate climates. The tiles are a relatively affordable option for homeowners looking to install solar panels. So far, Tesla solar panels been well-received, with many people saying that the tiles look great and offer a high degree of solar energy generation.

    Tile and Power Warranty

    Just like any solar panel installation, there is a risk that the tiles may not generate enough energy to cover your roof’s power needs. In those cases, Tesla guarantees that its solar roof tiles will still provide power for at least 25 years. If you ever have any problems with the tiles’ performance, contact Tesla and they will work with you to resolve the issue.

    Fire Rating

    Tesla solar roof tiles are a new type of roofing that uses solar energy to generate electricity. The tiles have a fire rating of 2 hours or less, which is much higher than traditional roofs. So far, there isn’t much information available about Tesla solar roof tiles – only what has been released so far by the company. However, since they are made from glass fiber-reinforced plastic and can be installed in minutes, it seems like they would be a good option for those looking for an environmentally friendly roofing solution.

    Roof Pitch

    Roof pitch is the angle at which a roof’s eaves, or sides, slope downwards. This affects both how much light comes in and the air flow underneath the roof. The ideal roof pitch varies depending on the climate zone where you live, but should be between 2-6 degrees.

    Wind Rating

    With Haleakala Solar’s Tesla solar roof installations, you can enjoy the power of the sun without any worries about energy bills. These roof tiles are made of glass and metal that can collect energy from the sun. Installing solar roofs have a wind rating of 2200 W/m2 which is more than other roofs on the market, making it an architectural grade steel tiles. The solar electricity that is produced from existing roofs are designed to last for 25 years and will produce power for your home during the day and at night, making them perfect for those who want to reduce their carbon footprint. You can choose between a black or white tile design for the building integrated photovoltaics and there is also a version that has a color glass facade so that it matches your home’s style perfectly for the best energy production, replacing your existing roof with our solar tile!

    Tesla Solar Inverter Power

    Tesla solar shingle tiles are the best solar shingle brands and are a new type of roof that combines solar panels with traditional roofing tiles. It also goes well with the Tesla Powerwall 2, which is a compact home battery system to match the home’s aesthetic for a natural source of energy, replacing your old roof. The tiles are designed to look like regular roofing tiles and more power is produced, and they can be installed in just a few hours. They are made with durable material that will last for many years, and the warranty is lifetime. In addition to being awesome-looking, Tesla solar roof tiles also have some other benefits such as energy efficiency and lower electric bills. Tesla solar roof cost varies depending on your home and Tesla’s customer service is also outstanding. They can go on new construction properties or old roof replacement.

    Tesla Solar Roof Cost Estimate

    Tesla solar roof tiles are a new type of roofing that uses solar power to generate electricity. The tiles are made from polysilicon and glass, and they’re designed to look like traditional roof tiles. Tesla plans to begin production of the solar roofs in 2018, but pricing has not yet been announced. You can learn more about Tesla’s solar roof tiles by visiting their website or consulting with a contractor who is familiar with the product.

    Factors to Consider

    If you’re thinking about installing a new roofing system, you might want to consider Tesla solar roof tiles. These tiles are a new type of roofing that converts light into energy. They work by using thin, highly-efficient film that captures and stores sun energy. This solar power is then used to power your home or office. There are several benefits to solar roof tiles, including decreased maintenance costs and lower energy bills. You can choose a solar roof tile based on your lifestyle and needs – they come in both standard and wild styles! So if you’re looking for a new and innovative roofing system, give solar roof tiles a try.

    Roof Complexity

    Roof complexity is the total number of solar roof tiles on a roof.

    There are three types of roof complexity: small, medium and large.

    Small roofs can have less than 200 units, medium roofs have between 200-1,000 and large roofs have more than 1,000 units.

    You also need to consider your location – Tesla solar roof tiles work best in sunny areas.

    Roof Replacement

    When it comes to roof replacement, it is important to factor in the cost of such an undertaking. Depending on the type of tiles you have installed and how often they need replaced, the total expense could be quite high.

    Tesla offers a 10-year warranty on its solar roof tiles – but this does not cover wear and tear or leaks from over time. In order for your tiles to last as long as promised, keep them clean by regularly washing them with a mild detergent solution (dish soap will work) and drying them thoroughly after each wash.

    Also remember that any upfront installation costs (e.g., consultation, permitting etc.) should be taken into account when calculating the final cost of solar roof replacement.

    Additional Costs and Upgrades

    There are a number of additional costs and upgrades that you will need to factor in when purchasing solar roof tiles. Some of the more common expenses include an installation fee, maintenance fees, and wiring upgrades.

    Once all costs are tallied, your final cost will be determined. Keep in mind that there is no set price for solar roof tiles – may vary based on the product’s features and specifications.

    Powerwall

    Tesla’s solar roof tiles are a new type of roofing that features solar panels on top. The tiles work in tandem with the company’s Powerwall batteries to store energy from the sun and use it later when needed. The tiles can be installed on any type of roof, and they’re weather-resistant so you don’t have to worry about them deteriorating over time. Tesla plans to start selling its solar roof tiles in 2020, and they’ll cost around 21,000 per square foot. If this all sounds like your dream roofing solution, keep reading to find out more about the tiles and how they work.

    Tesla Solar Panels vs. Tesla Solar Roof

    If you’re interested in solar power, you’re probably wondering what Tesla solar roof tiles are all about. Tesla solar roof tiles are a more advanced version of solar panels that you’re probably familiar with. The solar roof is made from glass instead of plastic, which makes it stronger and more resistant to weathering. The tiles are also modular, so you can change the look of your roof without having to replace the entire system. Tesla solar roof tiles are currently available in a few different styles, and they’re scheduled to be available in more styles in the future. If solar power is something that you’re interested in, but you’re unsure whether Tesla solar roof tiles are the right choice for you, take a look at our comparison chart to see which option is best for you.

    What Size Tesla Roof Will You Need?

    Tesla solar roof tiles are a new type of roofing that has captured the attention of homeowners and businesses alike. If you’re thinking about installing them, or are just curious about what they’re all about, read on for all the information you need. First, you need to decide how much space you have on your rooftop. This will help you determine the size of the Tesla solar roof tiles you’ll need. Second, be sure to read the installation instructions carefully – they can be complex and it’s important to follow them to the letter. Third, be aware that the size of the Tesla solar roof tiles will vary depending on the location – they’re not universal designs like traditional roofs are. And finally, once you’ve ordered your tiles and read the installation instructions, be sure to follow them to the letter!

    Is It Worth It to Get a Tesla Solar Roof?

    As more and more people become interested in renewable energy, solar roof tiles from Tesla are becoming a hot commodity. Tesla solar roof tiles are a revolutionary new product that offers homeowners solar power and protection from weather damage. The tiles can be installed on any kind of roof, and they’re designed to last for 30 years. Tesla estimates that the average homeowner will save 20-30 per month on their energy bill using its solar roof tiles. There are still some kinks to be worked out with the system, but overall it looks like a very promising option for homeowners interested in conservation and renewable energy. If you’re interested in learning more about Tesla solar roof tiles, be sure to check out our blog for more information.

    Does the Tesla Solar Roof increase home value?

    There is no doubt that the Tesla solar roof tiles are a unique and exciting product. They come with a 10-year warranty, high-quality materials, and no need for additional equipment – just your standard roofing tools!

    Depending on where you live, you might be able to save money by using the tiles instead of traditional solar panels. Granted, this will depend on your location, budget, etc., but as long as you have an idea about what kind of savings you can expect there isn’t much not to like about them.

    How long does the Tesla solar roof last?

    The Tesla solar roof is a new type of roof that uses solar energy to generate electricity. It is made of several layers of glass and tiles that work together to capture the sun’s rays. You can get a Tesla solar roof in either black or white, and it will last for 25 years. The standard version costs 26,500 while the premium version costs 29,000.

    How long is the installation time for a Tesla Solar Roof?

    The installation time for a Tesla solar roof is longer than regular roofs. You will need to wait at least two weeks for your tile to arrive from the factory. The final cost of the installation will depend on the size of your home and the type of roof you choose.

    How efficient is the Tesla Solar Roof?

    When it comes to roofing, there are a number of options available. From shingle roofs to tiled solar roofs, the choice can be overwhelming. However, what if we told you that Tesla solar roof tiles are the latest and most efficient innovation in this field?

    Not only do they look great on your home’s exterior, but their special technology also makes them much more energy-efficient than traditional roofs. In fact, Tesla solar roof tiles have been found to generate up to twice as much power as traditional asphalt or metal roofs! So not only will you save money on your monthly energy bills; you’ll also help conserve resources for future generations.

    Furthermore, two different styles – matte and glossy – are available in both a sleek design and suitable for any climate condition. What’s more, no installation is required – simply place the tiles onto your roof and start saving today!

    How much electricity does a Tesla solar roof generate?

    Tesla solar roof tiles are more than just a pretty face – they actually generate electricity! Considering the rising of energy, this is something that many people can appreciate.

    For those who don’t know, solar roof tiles are made up of multiple panels that collect energy from the sun and turn it into usable power for your home. Depending on how much sunlight your house gets, you can expect to save anywhere from 3,500 to over 100k in total over the course of its lifetime.

    Even if you have average or bad sun exposure, a Tesla solar roof is still worth considering as it will likely save you money in the long run.

    Can you go off-grid with a Tesla Solar Roof?

    When it comes to solar panels, there are a lot of options available on the market. However, what sets Tesla solar roof tiles apart is their unique design – which incorporates shingles made of glass and metal that act as solar cells.

    Of course, this isn’t a cheap product – at least not when compared to other similar products on the market. over, you will also need to have a Tesla Powerwall in order to use these tiles- something that may or may not be necessary depending on your needs and preferences.

    As with any new technology, there are bound to be some glitches along the way. So make sure you’re willing t o put up with them in order t o reap the many benefits associated with using solar panels – including reduced energy bills and lower emissions from your home!

    How do solar shingles compare to conventional solar panels?

    If you’re thinking about installing solar panels on your roof, you may be wondering what the best option is. solar shingles may be a good option for you. Photovoltaic shingles are made of thin, glassy tiles that capture sunlight and turn it into electricity. The roof structure is not required, so they’re a more affordable option than traditional solar panels. solar shingles also create less heat than conventional panels, which can improve air quality in the home. solar shingles have a longer lifespan than traditional roofs – they should last between 25 and 30 years without any maintenance or repairs needed.

    Pros and cons of solar shingles

    Solar roof tiles are a new trend in the roofing industry and they’re gaining a lot of popularity. They are made up of solar cells that can collect energy from the sun and turn it into power. This power can then be used to power the tiles, or it can be stored in the tiles and used later on when needed. The main benefit of solar roof tiles is that they’re environmentally-friendly. They’re also easy to install – just peel and stick! However, there are some cons to consider. For example, solar roof tiles are quite expensive and there’s a risk that they may malfunction in the long-term. They can also help power electric vehicles and serve your energy needs with a new roof.

    What are the advantages of solar roof shingles?

    Solar roof shingles are a great option for people who want an environmentally-friendly roof solution. They are much more affordable than traditional roofing solutions and the tiles can be installed in just one day. over, solar roof shingle have a lifespan of up to 30 years, which makes them an ideal long-term investment. There are a few disadvantages – the tiles may not look as good as traditional roofs and they may require occasional maintenance (e.g., cleaning).

    What are the disadvantages of solar roof shingles?

    Solar roof shingles are a new type of roof that has the ability to collect energy from the sun and use it to power your home.

    The downside is that they are not available in all areas yet, and there are some cons associated with them.

    Inactive shingles and other roofing material can malfunction after your roof installed tiles are in place.

    One of the disadvantages is that they can be quite expensive – check with Haleakala Solar for best solar generation pricing in your area.

    Another disadvantage is that they need sunlight to work properly – if it’s dark outside, the tiles will not work.

    Regular Solar Panels vs. Tesla solar roof: which one is better?

    When it comes to solar energy, there are a few important things to keep in mind. The first is that solar panels come in many different shapes and sizes, with different benefits and drawbacks. One such solar panel is the Tesla solar roof tiles. These tiles combine the look and feel of traditional roof tiles with the benefits of solar energy. They’re made from metal, glass, and plastic and can be installed on any kind of roofing material. Additionally, the panels have a range of features that make them different from other types of solar panels, including automatic weatherization and deepwater charging capabilities. Overall, Tesla roofs are a better option than regular rooftop panels because they’re less expensive to install and maintain over time. So if you’re looking to invest in solar energy, make sure to consider a Tesla solar roof tiles!

    Can I put them on top of the shingles that I already have on my house?

    You can install Tesla solar roof tiles on top of your existing shingles, if you’re okay with the wait time and cost of installation.

    The tiles come in two styles – a traditional black tile and a sleek white tile. The white tile reflects more sunlight, hence saving energy during daytime hours.

    You will need an electrician to install them for you. Tesla provides free estimates.

    How do they work, how much energy do they produce, and how long will it take before I see any results from this investment?

    Solar roof tiles are made up of several layers that work by trapping sunlight and converting it into usable energy. In the process, solar tiles produce electricity while being installed on your home. Once installed, solar roof tiles can generate power for around 25 years or more!

    As for how much power solar tiles will produce? It depends on the location – in some cases, solar roof tiles may be able to produce enough power to offset your monthly utility bill. So, patience is key and you’ll see results sooner than you think!

    Does Tesla’s Solar Roof really work?

    Yes, Tesla’s Solar Roof really does work! The tiles are designed to capture and store solar energy to provide power for your home. The roof also has a built in shingles that can be replaced as needed, and is weatherproof so you don’t have to worry about rain or snow damaging them. You will only need to pay for the electricity generated by the roof, nothing more – this differs from traditional rooftop solar panels which require ongoing maintenance and installment costs.

    Is there a difference between the shingles that come with the standard solar panels and those that come with the Solar Roof?

    There is definitely a difference between the solar roof tiles that come with Tesla’s solar products and the solar roof tiles that come with Solar Roof.

    The solar roof tiles are made with a material called textured glass tile that reflects sunlight. This makes them much more efficient than solar panels at converting energy into electricity.

    Additionally, the shingles come in two types: vinyl and textured concrete. The vinyl shingles are less expensive but they may require special cleaning techniques. The textured concrete shingles are more durable but they may require special cleaning techniques. In general, it should last 10 to 20 years without needing replacement.

    Which one is better: regular or premium shingles from Tesla’s Solar Roof?

    The Tesla solar roof tiles are made of two different types of materials: regular and premium. The regular shingles will cost you a bit more but they’re also easier to install. Premium shingles are high quality and last longer, but they require a professional installer. With both options, the solar roof tiles generate electricity for your home while protecting it from the sun – perfect for those who want to go green!

    How much does a solar roof cost, including installation fees and taxes?

    The cost of a solar roof installation ranges from 21,500 to 53,000, depending on the size and type of roof. This cost includes installation fees and taxes. Additionally, you should factor in the value of your roof’s existing insulation and whether or not you will need an additional warranty.

    Overall, solar roofs are a great investment for people who want to reduce their energy bills and protect their homes from climate change.

    How long does it take to install a solar roof on your house or business building?

    The installation process for a solar roof on your home or business building typically takes about two days, with some necessary tools like a level, drill, and screws required to get the job done. Once your roof is prepared, solar roof tiles will be installed on top. After that, you’ll just need to connect the power and enjoy clean energy while looking good at the same time!

    Conclusion

    Solar roof tiles are a new product from Tesla that is currently being tested by some homeowners in the US. If you’re interested in knowing more about solar roof tiles, read on to find out what you need to know! solar roof tiles are a new product from Tesla that is currently being tested by some homeowners in the US. If you’re interested in knowing more about solar roof tiles, read on to find out what you need to know! solar roof tiles are a new product from Tesla that is currently being tested by some homeowners in the US. If you’re interested in knowing more about solar roof tiles, read on to find out what you need to know! solar roof tiles are a new product from Tesla that is currently being tested by some

    The Ultimate Guide to Tesla Warranty Coverage – Model S, 3, X, Y

    As anyone who’s looked into Tesla’s warranty specifics knows, there’s plenty of ground to cover. We’re here to help break it down for you!

    What does Tesla’s warranty cover? Does a used Tesla warranty transfer to a new owner? What is included on the Tesla battery warranty? And the question that’s on every pre-owned Tesla buyer’s mind: can you buy an extended warranty on a used Tesla? (hint: the answer is sometimes, so read on!)

    In this Ultimate Guide, we’ll be exploring the Tesla warranty terms model by model, new vs used Tesla warranty situations, and what the Tesla warranty doesn’t cover.

    For the following sections, we’ll break down Tesla’s new vehicle warranties on a model-specific level. Afterwards, we’ll explore Tesla’s battery warranty terms, specifics on Tesla’s extended warranty, whether Tesla tires have a warranty, and ways that you can void a Tesla Warranty in the following sections.

    If you are just looking for quick answers to Frequently Asked Questions about what’s included in a Tesla warranty, feel free to skip ahead to that section!

    Tesla Model S Warranty Explained

    The current warranty for a new Model S is called the New Vehicle Limited Warranty, which is a package of three warranty areas: the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty, the Supplemental Restraint System Limited Warranty, and the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.

    The Model S Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty is coverage for workmanship or materials defects on anything that Tesla itself manufactures or supplies. They specify “under normal use,” which pretty much means that if parts or materials fail during post-apocalyptic off-roading or an attempt to tow a tank behind your Model S, it’s not Tesla’s fault that the air spring dies or the differential cracks. Tesla’s Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty covers the cost of materials and repair (parts and labor) on defects for 4 years / 50,000 miles and is subject to whichever of those numbers comes first.

    Tesla’s Supplemental Restraint System Limited Warranty covers original airbag and seatbelt systems on the Model S installed or made by Tesla. Cost of replacement or repair on these systems is covered under the warranty for up to 5 years / 60,000 miles (again, whichever happens first).

    The Tesla Model S Battery and Drive Unit Warranty covers a very generous 8 years or 150,000 miles. We’ll go into more depth on specifics for this warranty in its own section (important on the Model S, because the warranty terms for some pre-2020 models vary), but the terms here are pretty generous.

    The balance of the warranty transfers owner-to-owner, so if you buy a used Tesla within the years or mileage allotted to the original warranty period, you’ll still have coverage (with exceptions: see the salvage and warranty voiding sections for further info). Warranty transferability is great news for a used Model S; a number of small but potentially irritating manufacturing issues have cropped up over the years. Some of these issues include broken door handles, condensation inside the taillights, yellowing of the touchscreen control panel, and suspension problems.

    namaste, solar, blog, tesla, roof, warranty

    How does Tesla’s Model S warranty compare to other manufacturers’ warranties? Honestly, Tesla’s warranty is pretty generous. For example, the 2022 Chevrolet Bolt is warrantied bumper-to-bumper for only 3 years or 36,000 miles, and the extra time on the electric vehicle warranty lasts for 8 years or 100,000 miles. That’s a year less for general coverage and 50,000 miles less for electric battery and drive components than the Model S.

    Tesla Model 3 Warranty 101

    Tesla’s Model 3 comes with their New Vehicle Limited Warranty on the day of delivery or from the first day the Model 3 is put into service (such as a loaner during repairs or a company vehicle). The New Vehicle Limited Warranty comes with Tesla’s Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty, their Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty, and their Battery and Drive Unit Warranty (head’s up: the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty has some variable terms depending on the Model 3 trim level).

    Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty for the Model 3 is essentially bumper to bumper coverage for 4 years or 50,000 miles. The warranty covers manufacturing defects, like cosmetic issues on delivery and materials failure under normal driving conditions. It does not cover things like collisions or normal wear and tear (think tires, seat covers, and windshield wiper blades).

    The Model 3’s Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty is good for 5 years or 60,000 miles, and it covers the airbag and seatbelt systems originally manufactured or installed (provided) by Tesla.

    Tesla’s Battery and Drive Unit Warranty is good for 8 years / 100,000 miles (whichever number the vehicle reaches first) on the Model 3 Standard Range (and, basically, the RWD Model 3) or 8 years / 120,000 miles for the Model 3 Long Range and the Model 3 Performance. We’ll get to the specifics of the battery warranty in a later section, but it basically covers manufacturing defects and damage from a battery fire (with exceptions).

    The Model 3’s New Vehicle Limited Warranty is transferable to each owner for the balance of the warranty period (there are coverage exceptions: see the salvage and warranty voiding sections for further info). Obviously, buyers of a used Model 3 should remain aware of warranty conditions, but not many serious warranty issues past 2017 seem to plague the Model 3. The most common issues for the Model 3 involve paint chipping, misaligned panels, condensation in headlights and taillights, and heat pump failure (which makes for some serious discomfort in extreme climates).

    Is the Model 3’s warranty a good one? We think so. For instance, the Model 3’s Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty lasts longer than the basic warranty on the Nissan Leaf, which has a 3 year/36,000 mile duration. As for the battery warranty, Nissan seems to be admitting that Tesla’s standard is better, and the 2022 Leaf matches Tesla’s battery warranty for time and mileage. So much to say, the Model 3 has had such a good warranty that other manufacturers have had to up their own warranty games.

    Tesla Model X Warranty – All the Facts

    Tesla’s iconic falcon-wing Model X comes with their New Vehicle Limited Warranty. This warranty includes Tesla’s Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty, their Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty, and their Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.

    The Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty on the Model X is essentially bumper to bumper coverage on Tesla manufactured and provided parts, excluding wear and tear items such as windshield wiper blades, brake pads, and the like. This warranty period on the Model X is for 4 years or 50,000 miles. For the Model X, it’s important to pay attention to this warranty period and its conditions; some long-standing reliability issues with the falcon-wing doors can lead to some unpleasant repair or replacement costs down the road. For this reason, buyers looking for a used Model X should strongly consider getting an extended warranty if the vehicle qualifies (more on that in the Extended Warranty section down below).

    The Safety Restraint System (SRS) Limited Warranty covers all parts of the Model X’s airbag and and seatbelt systems that are made or supplied by Tesla, and the coverage lasts for 5 years or 60,000 miles.

    Tesla’s Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty for the Model X covers the battery and drivetrain systems for 8 years and 150,000 miles, whichever the vehicle reaches first. This warranty covers manufacturing defects and a minimum battery capacity of 70% retention over the warranty’s time frame, and it also concerns damage as a result of a battery fire. We’ll get more into the specifics of this warranty in the Battery Warranty section down below (important on the Model X, because the warranty terms for some pre-2020 models vary).

    Some common possible warranty issues for the Model X include MCU issues, drive shaft failure, and leaking rear door seals. And it’s always a good idea to keep an eye on the function of those Falcon Wing Doors.

    How does the warranty on the Model X compare to other EVs? Pretty favorably; while it has a slightly shorter timeframe and mileage for basic body coverage than its direct competitor the 2022 Jaguar I-PACE (which covers basic systems for a year or 10,000 miles longer than Tesla), the Model X’s Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty shows Tesla’s confidence in their tech with a generous 8 year / 150,000 miles. That’s 50,000 miles longer than what the I-PACE offers on its battery coverage.

    Tesla Model Y Warranty – Everything You Need to Know

    Tesla’s Model Y falls under the New Vehicle Limited Warranty umbrella of warranty subsections that include a Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty, a Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty, and a Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.

    The Model Y’s Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty covers parts manufactured or provided by Tesla for 4 years or 50,000 miles. This includes things like body panels, the touch screen control panel, side mirrors, and so on. It does not include wear and tear items like wiper blades and seating material.

    The Model Y’s Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty covers seat belt and air bag systems for up to 5 years or 60,000 miles. Repair and replacement costs for defective materials or workmanship are covered so long as they fall within the guidelines provided by Tesla’s warranty documentation (we’ll cover a few ways you can void your warranty in a later section).

    The Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty for the Model Y covers those systems for 8 years or 120,000 miles in the Long Range and Performance trims. This warranty covers damage due to battery fires or unacceptably low battery capacity retention (see the battery warranty section for fuller details on how this works).

    As the Model Y shares so much of the Model 3’s manufacturing line, it occasionally suffers from some of the same build issues. Mostly, this boils down to panel misalignment, heat pump issues, and condensation in the lights.

    How does the Tesla Model Y warranty stand up to competitors? While Tesla doesn’t offer the all-around most generous warranty on the market as competitors like the 2022 Hyundai Kona Electric are offering warranty periods longer than 8 years on their drivetrains, Tesla warranties typically stand up to the competition in the broader terms of the warranty agreement. And sometimes longer doesn’t always mean better; unlike the Kona’s warranty (which only allows for a partial transfer of coverage), the Tesla warranty is fully transferable between owners.

    Tesla Battery Warranty – What’s Included What’s Not

    Tesla’s Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty covers the battery pack and drivetrain components of all of Tesla’s new vehicles for 8 years and varying mileage depending on the model. The Model X and Model S are covered up to 150,000 miles under this warranty if the car hasn’t already reached 8 years from the first date of sale or service. For the Long Range and Performance versions of the Model 3 and Model Y, the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty covers up to 120,000 miles. The Standard Range Model 3 (and, basically, any RWD Model 3) is covered up to 100,000 miles. Again, the warranty period ends with whichever of these criteria is reached first: 8 years or the model-specific mileage.

    One more factor in this warranty, and one that potential used Tesla buyers should be particularly aware of, is the 70% minimum battery capacity retention clause. Basically, this means that Tesla will replace the battery pack if it falls below 70% of the original range on a full charge within the warranty period for that vehicle.

    Overall, Tesla expects its battery packs to retain capacity at an acceptable rate for a very long time (certainly past the 8 year warranty period). Since the vehicles are still so new, it is difficult to say what the overall degradation rate has been for each Tesla model, but with the data that’s currently available on the Model S, there seems to be about a 10-15% degradation in the Model S’s battery capacity over 150,000-200,000 miles. Since the Model S is under warranty for 8 years or 150,000 miles, most vehicles in this range, which have a battery capacity retention of 85% or higher, will not have needed a battery replacement under the warranty conditions and still likely won’t for a long time.

    However, when a battery replacement is needed, the out-of- cost at this time is still very high. Battery replacement costs on a Tesla range widely, reportedly anywhere from 10,000-25,000 for parts and labor. like these make Tesla’s battery degradation warranty an extremely valuable part of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty.

    It’s also worth noting that the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty is not a part of Tesla’s Extended Service Agreement. The Used Vehicle Limited Warranty for what used to be called Tesla CPO vehicles (now just Tesla Used Inventory) doesn’t extend coverage for the battery, either. 8 years, 100,000-150,000 miles. That’s it.

    If those seem daunting (well, they are), it might help to know that improvements in battery design and production mean that battery are continuing to drop. What this means for the future of used Tesla battery replacement is unclear, but we’re hopeful that battery replacement will become more affordable as more Tesla vehicles and more cost-effective battery technologies make it to market.

    Price aside, if the battery degradation (the reduction of battery capacity over time) is so low for a Tesla, why worry about the warranty? Well, there are several factors that can heavily affect that degradation percentage. The amount of discharge and charging cycles per day, fast charging, and the environment that the Tesla was used in all play a part in how quickly the battery might degrade, so not all Teslas will experience battery degradation at the same rate. Knowing information on the battery’s warranty period as well as an owner’s driving habits should heavily influence your used Tesla buying decision. For instance, if the pre-owned Tesla in question is likely to have experienced extreme conditions, we’d say it’s a very good idea to make sure the used Tesla’s battery is still under warranty at the time of purchase and for some time in the future. Nobody wants to have an otherwise great car with an unacceptable driving range thanks to battery capacity degradation.

    It’s important to note that any damage that results from a battery fire is included in the warranty, though there are a few conditions. First, the battery fire can’t be caused by damage that was previously sustained. This doesn’t mean that a collision that results in a battery fire isn’t covered (it is), but it does mean that if the proper repairs after a collision or accident aren’t made (and thoroughly documented), then Tesla will not be responsible if those damages later lead to a battery fire. Makes sense, right?

    So what is not included in the Battery and Drive Unit Warranty? First off, damage from driving on bad roads. Impact from a rock or other road debris that causes battery damage isn’t covered; after all, driving damage isn’t generally considered a manufacturing defect. Damage that can result from failing to follow proper charging procedures can also void the warranty; Tesla warns against allowing the vehicle to fall to a 0% charge level for an extended period of time or using it as a stationary power source.

    Tesla also typically doesn’t cover roadside assistance in cases where the owner allows the battery to run completely out. Makes sense; after all, if you ran an ICE car out of gas, it’s not likely that the manufacturer would agree to help you get home or to a mechanic.

    Additionally, any attempt to open or service the battery compartment by anyone who does not have Tesla certification also voids the warranty. You should keep this warranty condition in mind either when looking at buying a used Tesla that may have been worked on or when contemplating doing some work yourself (really not recommended regardless of warranty; there’s some seriously deadly voltage in those things).

    Here’s a look at battery warranty conditions broken down by model:

    Model S Battery Warranty

    Tesla’s current Model S battery warranty covers the battery pack and components for up to 150,000 miles or 8 years, whichever is reached first, with a minimum battery capacity retention of 70% (or a maximum 30% degradation of capacity since the day of delivery or the vehicle being put into service). Warranty terms include coverage for parts, repair, and labor costs.

    This warranty does not include damage due to fire (except in the case of battery fire in the conditions mentioned above), flooding, attempts at service by non-certified personnel, or failure to follow best battery charging practices.

    A quick note that should be of interest to buyers looking for a used Model S: Tesla’s pre-2020 battery warranty for the Model S was either an 8 year and unlimited mile warranty for a battery pack 70kWh or greater, or an 8 year and 125,000 mile warranty for a 40 or 60 kWh battery pack.

    Model 3 Battery Warranty

    Tesla’s battery warranty for the Model 3 covers the battery pack and components for up to 8 years and 100,000 miles on the Model 3 Standard Range, or 120,000 miles on the Long Range or Performance Model 3. A minimum battery capacity retention of 70% is also covered. Terms of the Model 3 battery warranty include coverage for parts, repair, and labor costs.

    The Model 3’s battery warranty does not cover damage due to fire (except in the case of battery fire in the conditions mentioned above), failure to follow best battery charging practices, attempts at service by non-certified personnel, or battery compartment flooding.

    Model X Battery Warranty

    Tesla’s Model X battery warranty coverage extends to the battery pack and related components for up to 8 years and 150,000 miles. Also covered is a minimum battery capacity retention of 70%. Parts, repair, and labor costs related to the battery system are included in the Model X battery warranty terms.

    The Model X battery warranty does not cover damage due to attempts at service by non-certified personnel, fire (except in the case of battery fire in the conditions mentioned above), failure to follow best battery charging practices, or battery compartment flooding.

    Buyers looking for a used Model X may want to take note of the fact that Tesla’s pre-2020 warranty for the Model X was either an 8 year and unlimited mile warranty for a battery pack 70kWh or greater, or an 8 year and 125,000 mile warranty for a 60 kWh battery pack.

    Model Y Battery Warranty

    The Performance and Long Range Model Y battery warranty covers the battery pack and components for 120,000 miles (Model Y Standard is 100,000 miles) or 8 years and minimum battery retention capacity of 70% (or degradation of battery capacity over 30%). Warranty terms include cost coverage for parts, repair, and labor.

    The Model Y’s battery warranty does not cover damage due to battery compartment flooding, attempts at service by non-certified personnel, fire (except in the case of battery fire in the conditions mentioned above), or failure to follow best battery charging practices.

    Tesla Million Mile Battery Warranty—Is It Real?

    Tesla’s Model X and Model S previously (before 2020) came with an 8 year, unlimited mile warranty on the battery for vehicles with a battery pack of 75 kWh and above. Whether or not you could actually drive a million miles in a Tesla before 8 years is up is certainly a fun calculation with a lot of real world factors involved. Realistically, though, this condition of the warranty simply means that Tesla expected their battery to last for at least 8 years under normal (or even a bit more enthusiastic) driving conditions.

    Tesla Extended Warranty – How Does it Work?

    Used Tesla Warranties

    Tesla offers two kinds of warranty that go beyond the New Vehicle Limited Warranty.

    First, Tesla offers an Extended Service Agreement (ESA). The ESA extends manufacturing defect basic coverage of the vehicle for 2-4 years and transfers owner to owner. This option is available for the 2012-2020 Model S, 2015-2020 Model X, Model 3, and Model Y.

    Second, Tesla offers a Used Vehicle Limited Warranty that extends basic coverage to their inspected Used Inventory cars for an additional year and 10,000 miles. This warranty is valid on all of Tesla’s Used Inventory.

    We’ll get into the specifics of each kind of extended warranty down below:

    Used Tesla Warranties – Extended Service Agreement

    Purchase of an Extended Service Agreement (ESA) for the Model S or Model X (manufactured between 2012-2020), the Model 3, or the Model Y through Tesla can be made if the vehicle is is still within the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty period.

    Recent changes (as of 3/31/2023): The ESA used to come with two tiers/options, but now the ESA has been standardized into one option with pricing differences between models. Tesla also removed the grace period that allowed owners to purchase an ESA within 30 days / 1000 miles of the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty period, so if that date has passed for your Tesla, you are out of luck. The good news is that the Model 3 and Model Y are now eligible for this extended warranty coverage!

    Tesla’s Extended Service Agreement covers parts and labor for repairs on manufacturing defects for 2 years or 25,000 miles (whichever comes first). The ESA cost depends on the model:

    Model S (2012-2020): Extended Service Agreement pricing for the Model S is 3,100.

    Model 3: Tesla’s Extended Service Agreement costs 1,800 for the Model 3.

    Model X (2015-2020): the current cost for the Extended Service Agreement on the Model X is 3,500.

    Model Y: The price for an Extended Service Agreement on the Model Y is 2,000

    The ESA doesn’t cover wear and tear items like tires, brake pads, and so on. Wear and tear can also affect whether or not issues such as certain suspension issues are considered covered under warranty, so it’s worth being aware that the ESA coverage is not as broad as the original New Vehicle Limited Warranty. The ESA also doesn’t cover the battery or drivetrain components; fortunately, those might still be covered for most of the ESA warranty period from their own Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty balance.

    There is a 100 deductible for service visits included in the ESA (down from 200 in the previous agreement), which is part of the cost to consider when you are looking into whether or not purchasing an Extended Service Agreement is right for you.

    Does Tesla’s Extended Service Agreement transfer to a new owner? Yes, it sure does! Just like the New Vehicle Limited Warranty, the balance of the ESA can transfer to the new owner in a private sale (but not through dealerships and other 3rd parties). To make sure everything checks out, the transfer has to occur through Tesla.

    Note: if you bought your Tesla pre-owned from a dealership or other 3rd party, Tesla may not offer you an Extended Service Agreement even if your Tesla is otherwise eligible.

    Fun fact: because of the way Tesla sells the ESA, you can’t bundle it into the price of your vehicle purchase; it has to be purchased separately. One nice feature of this setup is that the Extended Service Agreement cost won’t get factored into the interest of your car payments.

    Used Model 3/Y Warranties – Extended Service Agreement

    Tesla recently added an Extended Service Agreement for the Model 3 and Model Y (see pricing and terms in the previous section). The ESA is added to the balance of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty and begins immediately after the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty Ends. Additionally, if the Model 3 or Model Y is purchased through Tesla’s used inventory, Tesla will add on a Used Vehicle Limited Warranty (or what used to be called the CPO warranty—more on this in the next section).

    and formerly CPO Warranty)

    While Tesla used to have a Certified Pre-Owned program with a 2-4 year warranty extension, they have changed that practice in recent years. Under the Used Vehicle Limited Warranty, pre-owned Tesla vehicles purchased directly from Tesla’s Used Inventory come with an additional 2 year / 100,000 miles of basic coverage that supersedes the original warranty terms and period for the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty and the Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty. This provision doesn’t extend the battery and drivetrain warranties.

    The Used Vehicle Limited Warranty is available on the Model 3, Model Y, Model S, and Model X. Since Tesla performs an inspection on each vehicle in their Used Inventory prior to sale, you should get some extra peace of mind in knowing that a genuine Tesla tech is willing to sign off on your used Tesla along with the warranty.

    It’s worth mentioning that you can’t get a Used Vehicle Limited Warranty without buying straight from Tesla’s Used Inventory, but you can buy a used Tesla Model S or Model X privately that’s still within the limits of the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty period and purchase an Extended Service Agreement yourself (see the ESA section of this guide for more details).

    Used Tesla Aftermarket (Non-Factory) Extended Warranties

    Another warranty option for buyers of used Teslas is an aftermarket or third-party warranty. These warranties are not backed by Tesla and have their own terms and conditions, as well as their own interests (note: keeping your money is pretty high on their interest list). These warranties can be a welcome option if your Tesla isn’t eligible for Tesla’s Extended Service Warranty, but they can also be source of major frustration.

    While there are reputable third-party warranty sellers out there, the third-party warranty market is rife with scammers and lacks stability. When possible, it’s probably better to stick with warranties that come straight from the source with a direct vested interest in keeping you happy with the Tesla brand; in other words, Tesla Motors.

    Used Tesla Warranty Transferability

    Does a used Tesla’s warranty transfer? The short answer is yes, the balance of Tesla’s warranties can transfer from owner to owner. We’d like to make it clear that Tesla only does this for owners, not through 3rd party dealers. A dealer cannot purchase an Extended Service Agreement (ESA) or carry the balance of either the ESA or the Used Vehicle Limited Warranty, and a Tesla purchased through a 3rd party dealer will not be eligible for an Extended Service Agreement. Additionally, the buyer and seller must file the appropriate paperwork for transferring the ESA or Used Vehicle Limited Warranty through Tesla within 30 days of the sale.

    It’s worth noting that in some cases you can cancel your ESA and receive a partial refund. This is especially handy if you have an ESA but want to sell to a dealership or other 3rd party. While the details are too case-specific to list here, the dollar amount you can get back on cancelling the ESA partly depends on the time remaining in your agreement.

    What About the Tesla Roadster Warranty?

    The first generation Tesla Roadster Warranty no longer applies; there simply aren’t Roadsters out there that fall within warranty limits. None of them are eligible for Tesla’s Extended Service Warranty, either, so purchasing a used Tesla Roadster typically requires the understanding that you are going to be paying for repairs out of

    Tesla Body Rust Limited Warranty

    Tesla takes their materials use seriously, so their Body Rust Limited Warranty covers manufacturing defects that cause perforation (holes) due to resulting rust and corrosion for 12 years and unlimited mileage. This does not include rust and corrosion damage resulting from aftermarket modifications that pierce the vehicle body.

    Since the body of the Model S and Model X are aluminum, body rust isn’t that big of an issue. However, the Model Y and Model 3 both have a significant amount of steel in the body, so owners should keep a close eye on areas of concern in case this warranty is needed. Buyers considering a used Tesla from colder climates that salt the roads should also take the Body Rust Limited Warranty warranty into consideration, though Tesla does specify rust due to “exposure to chemical substances” is not covered (road salt, anyone?).

    Tesla Parts, Body Paint Repair Limited Warranty

    Tesla’s additional warranty for Tesla-branded replacement parts is an extra complication on top of the general warranty with coverage for 12 months or 12,500 miles for the parts in question, but there are a few basic areas that are covered differently: sheet metal, the drive unit, the high voltage battery, wall connectors, and the touchscreen / media control unit. Each has a unique limit to its warranty that’s listed in detail on Tesla’s website.

    If you are looking into purchasing a used Tesla that has already seen some repairs, it’s definitely worth your time to find out when repairs were made and what additional warranty coverage may apply to the replacement parts.

    Tesla Tire Warranty – Are Tires Covered?

    The tires on a Tesla aren’t covered by the New Vehicle Limited Warranty, Used Vehicle Limited Warranty, or the Extended Service Agreement. Tires are considered a “normal wear and tear item” and aren’t manufactured by Tesla. Even though Tesla supplies the tires, they are not actually considered a tire dealer. It’s up to the manufacturer of the tire (Michelin, Continental, Goodyear, etc) to honor warranty claims.

    Salvage Tesla Vehicles – How Does the Warranty Apply?

    If a Tesla vehicle is designated as salvaged, considered a total loss by the insurance company, or damaged by fire or flooding—basically any time the vehicle has suffered massive damage at the hands of nature or humans and given a salvage title—then it is no longer covered by Tesla’s New Vehicle Limited Warranty no matter how many miles or years the car has been in service. This includes Tesla vehicles with damaged VIN numbers or odometer systems; after all, if Tesla can’t identify the vehicle or accurately calculate mileage, why would they pay to fix it?

    Things That Can Void a Tesla Warranty

    We’ve discussed a few of these details in previous sections, but here are a few things that can void Tesla’s warranty, broken down by warranty area:

    Battery: attempts to service the battery area by non-certified personnel, non-adherence to battery charging guidelines, using the vehicle as a stationary power source, flood or fire damage (exclusions apply for battery fires within limitations), collision or general damage that has intentionally not been repaired that leads to future battery failure.

    Drive Unit: loading the vehicle with cargo or passengers past its stated limitations, failure to make repairs, aftermarket modification (see below for further discussion on this point)

    Basic vehicle: aftermarket modification, failure to provide basic maintenance, failure to follow up on service alerts, failure to update software when prompted

    SRS: Aftermarket modification, failure to comply with recall advisories

    Corrosion and Rust: Damage as a result of perforation by aftermarket modification, undercoating or rust-proofing

    Please note that many of these items are applicable to more than one warranty area.

    Regarding aftermarket modifications:

    Under the terms of the Magnusson-Moss law in the US, manufacturers are generally prohibited from using tie-in sales to maintain warranty conditions. This means that though the Tesla warranty specifically states that aftermarket modification of the vehicle may void the warranty, this portion of the warranty conditions could be legally disputable. While an aftermarket modification could genuinely cause damage because it does not meet Tesla’s design criteria, Tesla could also use aftermarket modification as an excuse for not providing coverage.

    For example, could an aftermarket wheel void the terms of Tesla’s warranty in the event of suspension failure that should be covered? Under Tesla’s warranty terms, damage potentially caused by aftermarket wheels is a warranty-voiding situation, but under the terms of Magnusson-Moss, that could be disputable because insisting that the wheel only be manufactured by Tesla for warranty to be maintained could be considered a tie-in sales tactic.

    Long story short: it’s complicated. The general recommendation is that these kinds of situations be handled out of court, but Magnusson-Moss law provides consumers with a legal way forward if an agreement can’t be reached on a warranty dispute.

    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Tesla Warranties

    Need quick answers to Tesla warranty questions? If you answered yes, then this FAQ section is for you!

    Also—if you have further warranty questions about new and used Teslas that aren’t covered in this guide or the FAQ section, please feel free to drop us a line. We love to do what we can to help out our fellow Tesla enthusiasts!

    What does a Tesla warranty cover?

    Tesla’s warranty covers repairs and replacement costs related to manufacturing defects from parts that Tesla either makes or supplies as a part of the vehicle. This does not include wear and tear items such as tires, seat materials, brake pads, etc. It does include damage from a battery fire (with situational limitations).

    What’s the warranty on a Tesla?

    Currently, the warranty on a Tesla is called the New Vehicle Limited Warranty, which includes the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty (4 years or 50,000 miles), the Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty (5 years or 60,000 miles), and the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty (8 years or 100,000-150,000 depending on the vehicle model). This is good information to know even if you’re a seller; if you decide to put your Tesla up for sale, the buyer may ask questions about the warranty or transferability of the warranty.

    Can you buy an extended warranty on a used Tesla?

    Yes, you can buy an extended warranty on a used Tesla straight from Tesla itself under the right conditions. The Extended Service Agreement (ESA) is a 2 year / 25,000 mile extension of coverage (excluding the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty) that can be purchased if your Tesla is still under its Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty period (not available on 2021 and newer Model S or Model X). Alternative 3rd party options are also available.

    What is the Tesla Model 3 warranty?

    Tesla’s warranty on the Model 3 is called the New Vehicle Limited Warranty which includes their Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty (4 years / 50,000 miles), Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty (5 years, 60,000 miles), and Battery and Drive Unit Warranty (8 years / 100,000 miles for the Standard Range (basically, the RWD Model 3), or 8 years / 120,000 miles for the Long Range and Performance Model 3).

    Does Tesla offer an extended warranty?

    Yes, they do! Tesla’s extended warranty is called the Extended Service Agreement (ESA). You can extend your coverage for 2 years / 25,000 miles. Please note that Tesla does not extend its Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.

    Also: recent changes in the program state that a Model X and Model S manufactured in 2021 or later are not eligible for the ESA.

    If I buy a used Tesla, will the warranty transfer?

    Yes, the balance of a used Tesla’s warranty under the terms and conditions of the original warranty agreement will transfer directly between owners. The exception to this is for sales through 3rd party dealers, where the Extended Service Agreement or Used Vehicle Limited Warranty will not transfer to the next owner.

    How long is the battery warranty on a Tesla?

    Tesla’s Battery and Drive Unit Warranty covers 8 years or 100,000-150,000 miles depending on the vehicle model, including a guarantee of a minimum 70% battery capacity.

    Does Tesla have a lifetime warranty?

    No, there is no lifetime warranty on a Tesla, but for some Model X and Model S vehicles delivered before 2020 with battery packs rated at 70 kWh or higher, there is an unlimited mileage warranty condition on the battery. While this isn’t a lifetime warranty, it is a generous warranty situation for buyers of pre-owned Teslas.

    Can you extend Tesla’s warranty?

    Yes, you can extend your Tesla’s warranty with their Extended Service Agreement that increases the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty for 2 years / 25,000 miles past the original warranty period. This extended warranty applies to all eligible Model 3 and Model Y vehicles, but for the Model S and Model X, extended coverage is only available for vehicles manufactured during 2012-2020.

    How long is Tesla’s warranty?

    Starting at delivery or the first day of service, the New Vehicle Limited Warranty covers 4 years or 50,000 miles for the terms of the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty, 4 years or 60,000 miles for the terms of the Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty, and 8 years or 100,000-150,000 miles (depending on the vehicle model) for the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.

    How long is the battery warranty on a Tesla?

    Tesla’s Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty covers 8 years or 100,000-150,000 miles depending on the vehicle model, and battery capacity is guaranteed at a minimum of 70% for that time period.

    How much does a Tesla extended warranty cost?

    Tesla’s extended warranty is called the Extended Service Agreement covers parts and labor for repairs on manufacturing defects for 2 years or 25,000 miles (whichever comes first). The ESA cost depends on the model:

    Model S: Extended Service Agreement pricing for the Model S is 3,100.

    Model 3: Tesla’s Extended Service Agreement costs 1,800 for the Model 3.

    Model X: the current cost for the Extended Service Agreement on the Model X is 3,500.

    Model Y: The price for an Extended Service Agreement on the Model Y is 2,000

    You can only purchase the ESA if your Tesla is still within the Basic Vehicle Warranty period.

    What things can void your Tesla warranty?

    Examples of things that can void your Tesla warranty include failure to provide proper maintenance and attention to service notifications or to install updates, attempting to access or repair the battery pack by non-certified personnel, loading the vehicle over its stated capacity, and aftermarket modification that results in damage.

    Are Teslas reliable?

    We think so! However, reliability is difficult to quantify with only a few years of data. While news stories abound about Tesla’s manufacturing glitches regarding panel misalignment and paint problems, the main battery and drive components seem to hold up remarkably well and don’t get nearly as much bad press. For what it’s worth, Consumer Reports surveys found that Tesla owners are overall highly satisfied with their vehicles.

    Should I purchase an extended warranty on my Tesla?

    Possibly. Tesla’s own Extended Service Agreement (ESA) is offered on earlier Model S and Model X (manufactured from 2012-2020) as well as the Model 3 and the Model Y. For the Model S and Model X, the relatively high out of costs of repairs could make the ESA worth your while, especially if you are considering buying a pre-owned Tesla and need that extra peace of mind. For the Model 3 and Model Y, the Tesla ESA isn’t too expensive and might be a more reliable option than 3rd party extended warranties.

    Does Tesla offer an extended warranty on Model 3 or Model Y?

    Yes! If your Model 3 or Model Y is still within its Basic Vehicle Warranty period, you can buy an Extended Service Agreement (2 years / 25,000 miles) for your Tesla right from the app. Select your Vehicle. Upgrades. Extended Service Agreement. Add to see the price for your model.

    Is it expensive to repair an out of warranty Tesla?

    Depending on the repair, it certainly can be. For example, a full battery replacement, including parts and labor, can cost somewhere in the 10,000-20,000 range. However, the battery is the heart of the EV and is the most expensive part. Other repairs tend to run lower, but in general repair costs on an out of warranty Tesla can be on the pricey side.

    Are third-party Tesla warranties any good?

    While the best warranty option always comes straight from Tesla, a third-party warranty may be a decent option when buying from a dealership. Tesla’s own extended warranties do not apply on Teslas bought through a dealer. However, remember that the third-party warrantor has only your money as its vested interest, not the reputation of brand or product. Resolving disputes with third-party warranty companies can also be a major hassle. And who hasn’t heard of the third-party extended warranty scam scene?

    Bottom line: there may be decent third-party options out there, but we don’t recommend them.

    What is the Tesla Model 3 battery replacement cost?

    The price for a replacement on a Model 3 battery is subject to individual situations, but there have been reports of costs as high as 16,000 for parts and labor. Fortunately, the need for a battery replacement on a Tesla seems rare.

    How much is a Tesla Model S battery replacement?

    Exact costs for replacing the Tesla Model S battery out of aren’t clear, though some data from owners suggest the cost of replacing the battery pack is somewhere between 10,000-20,000 for parts and labor. The good news is that many Teslas are still within their original battery warranty periods, and Tesla battery packs in general have excellent track records.

    How do I check my Tesla’s Warranty?

    You can check your Tesla’s warranty details right in the Tesla app. Under your vehicle tab, select View Details. Warranty to see what coverage areas are still active for your Tesla.

    Does the Tesla warranty cover windshield cracks or breaks?

    Unless the crack or break is a result of a defect in Tesla-manufactured windshield or window glass, Tesla warranty conditions do not cover cracks or breaks in the windshield. Typically, chips, cracks, or breaks in glass are a result of some kind of impact, and repair bills will fall to insurance and personal responsibility.

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