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Discover the energy oasis that can transform your life. Ready hour solar charger

Discover the energy oasis that can transform your life. Ready hour solar charger

    Discover the energy oasis that can transform your life!

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    Whether you’re facing a power cut in your neighborhood or looking out for a sufficient power supply during a camping trip, a portable power station serves as a great friend in such trying circumstances. Apart from providing backup power during emergencies, they can also be used for outdoor purposes. quite an all-around performance you can expect them to deliver.

    Added to that, portable power stations can be powered by renewable energy resources like solar energy, so if you’re an environmentalist or looking to make your contribution to safeguarding mother nature for future generations, a portable power station could well be your first step towards that cause.

    Meet Mango Power E. The power station that’ll ensure you never run out of power!

    Frequent power cuts and shortages can be a real menace and disrupt your routine at times. Power stations act as real saviors in such circumstances, provided you get a device that is strong enough to power up multiple appliances at a time.

    The Mango Power E portable power station was designed to serve this very purpose. It’s equipped with an impressive 3.5kWh CATL battery that’s extendable up to 14kWh. The CATL battery offers a range of premium battery cells that are used in some of the world’s famous electric vehicles, including Tesla, BMW, Mercedes, Ford, and more.

    CATL batteries are safer, more durable, and more efficient than other options in the market. They also offer a comparatively longer lifespan of about 6000 cycles, meaning you can charge this power station every day for 20 years!

    The CATL battery also ensures the Mango Power E maintains a high-temperature resistance and low noise level.

    With the Mango Power E, you can reach 0 to 80% charging within a mere 60 minutes, followed by another 30 minutes required for the device to be fully charged and ready to serve. Also, it can be charged in four different ways, so you can enjoy unmatched flexibility and convenience.

    Thanks to their cutting-edge technology, you can enjoy extended battery life, lightning-fast charging, and unwavering reliability like never before!

    Why should you invest in the Mango Power E portable power station?

    Green transformation is the need of the hour and a portable power station is one of the many ways to embrace this change. Furthermore, in a bid to boost the change, the government also offers a 30% federal residential solar energy credit that can be claimed on federal income taxes for a percentage of the cost of a solar PV system paid for by the taxpayer.

    The Mango Power E portable power station is an all-around device that can be used to power up devices both indoors and outdoors. What’s more, if you’re searching for a reliable home backup generator, the Mango Power E is available in lucrative bundles that can help you save beyond 1,000.

    The Mango Power power station is available in three different bundles: 1. Bundle 1: Mango Power E Portable Power Station 2 FREE 200W Solar Panels

    Discounted from 4,995 to 3,899 (Save 1,096).

    Discounted from 6,598 to 5,898 (Save 700).

    discover, energy, oasis, transform

    Discounted from 9,794 to 7,799 (Save 1,995).

    On top of that, Interesting Engineering readers can get a special 200 off by using the exclusive code INTENG200.

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    What should you consider when buying a portable power station?

    After you’ve decided on getting a power station, you’ll need to get well-acquainted with the necessary terms and factors to ensure you get your hands on the right one that suits your requirements.

    Glossary

    Let’s begin with the essential terms and metrics you’ll need to understand before you go ahead with the purchase.

    COMMENTARY | Illinois passed the latest law requiring new apartment buildings to be wired for EV chargers. Now apartment communities are figuring out the best ways to make shared charging work for everyone.

    This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

    discover, energy, oasis, transform

    than 3.6 million electric cars are driving around the U.S., but if you live in an apartment, finding an available charger isn’t always easy. Grocery stores and shopping centers might have a few, but charging takes time and the spaces may be taken or inconvenient.

    Several states and cities, aiming to expand EV use, are now trying to lift that barrier to ownership with “right to charge” laws.

    Illinois’ governor signed the latest right-to-charge law in June 2023, requiring that all parking spots at new homes and multiunit dwellings be wired so they’re ready for EV chargers to be installed. Colorado, Florida, New York and other states have passed similar laws in recent years.

    But having wiring in place for charging is only the first step to expanding EV use. Apartment building managers, condo associations and residents are now trying to figure out how to make charging efficient, affordable and available to everyone who needs it when they need it.

    Electric cars can benefit urban dwellers

    As a civil engineer who focuses on transportation, I study ways to make the shift to electric vehicles equitable, and I believe that planning for multiunit dwelling charging and accessibility is Smart policy for cities.

    Transitioning away from fossil-fueled vehicles to electric vehicles has benefits for the environment and the health of urban residents. It reduces tailpipe emissions, which can cause respiratory problems and warm the climate; it mitigates noise; and it improves urban air quality and quality of life.

    Surveys show most EV drivers charge at home, where electricity rates are lower than at public chargers and there is less competition for charging spots. In California, the leading state for EVs, 88% of early adopters of battery electric cars said they were able to charge at home, and workplace and public charging represented just 24% and 17% of their charging sessions, respectively. Nationwide, about 50% to 80% of all battery electric car charging sessions take place at home.

    Yet almost a quarter of all U.S. housing structures have more than one dwelling unit, according to the 2019 American Housing Survey. In California, 32.5% of urban dwellings have multiple units, and only a third of those units include access to a personal garage where a charger could be installed.

    Even if installing a personal charger is an option, it can be expensive in a multiunit dwelling if wiring isn’t already in place. And it often comes with other obstacles, including the potential need for electrical upgrades or challenges from homeowner association rules and restrictions. Installing chargers can involve numerous stakeholders who can impede the process – lot owners, tenants, homeowners associations, property managers, electric utilities and local governments.

    However, if a 240-volt outlet is already available, basic charger installation drops to a few hundred dollars.

    Right-to-charge laws aims for ubiquitous home charging

    Right-to-charge laws aim to streamline home charging access as new buildings go up.

    Illinois’ new Electric Vehicle Charging Act requires that 100% of parking spaces at new homes and multiunit dwellings be ready for electric car charging, with a conduit and reserved capacity to easily install charging infrastructure. The new law also gives renters and condominium owners in new buildings a right to install chargers without unreasonable restriction from landlords and homeowner associations.

    Apartments in a tower in China look down on an EV charging station covered in solar panels. Zhihao/Moment via Getty Images

    In a typical multiunit dwelling in Chicago – with an average of 14 cars in the parking lot – a small community charging hub with two level 2 chargers, the type common in homes and office buildings, can cover daily residential recharging demand at a cost of about 15 cents per kilowatt-hour. But having only two chargers means residents are waiting on average 2.2 hours to charge.

    A larger charging hub with eight level 2 chargers in the same city avoids the delay but increases the cost of charging to 21 cents per kWh because of upfront cost of purchasing and installing the chargers. To put that into context, the average electricity cost for Chicago residents is 16 cents per kWh.

    The future of charging management at multiunit dwellings will be automated for efficiency, with a computer or artificial intelligence determining the most efficient schedule for charging. Optimized scheduling can be responsive to the times renewable electricity generation sources are producing the most power – midday for solar energy, for example – and to dynamic electricity pricing. Automation can also eliminate delays for drivers while saving money and reducing the burden on the electric grid.

    The current limited access to home charging in many cities constrains electric vehicle adoption, slows down the decarbonization of U.S. transportation and exacerbates inequities in electric vehicle ownership. I believe efforts to expand charging in multidwelling buildings can help lift some of the biggest barriers and help reduce noise and pollution in urban cores at the same time.

    Eleftheria Kontou is an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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    discover, energy, oasis, transform

    We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

    Ready hour solar charger

    Author

    • Eleftheria Kontou Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Disclosure statement

    Eleftheria Kontou receives funding from the Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office, the National Science Foundation, the Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, and the Office of Naval Research.

    Partners

    than 3.6 million electric cars are driving around the U.S., but if you live in an apartment, finding an available charger isn’t always easy. Grocery stores and shopping centers might have a few, but charging takes time and the spaces may be taken or inconvenient.

    Several states and cities, aiming to expand EV use, are now trying to lift that barrier to ownership with “right to charge” laws.

    Illinois’ governor signed the latest right-to-charge law in June 2023, requiring that all parking spots at new homes and multiunit dwellings be wired so they’re ready for EV chargers to be installed. Colorado, Florida, New York and other states have passed similar laws in recent years.

    But having wiring in place for charging is only the first step to expanding EV use. Apartment building managers, condo associations and residents are now trying to figure out how to make charging efficient, affordable and available to everyone who needs it when they need it.

    Electric cars can benefit urban dwellers

    As a civil engineer who focuses on transportation, I study ways to make the shift to electric vehicles equitable, and I believe that planning for multiunit dwelling charging and accessibility is Smart policy for cities.

    Transitioning away from fossil-fueled vehicles to electric vehicles has benefits for the environment and the health of urban residents. It reduces tailpipe emissions, which can cause respiratory problems and warm the climate; it mitigates noise; and it improves urban air quality and quality of life.

    Surveys show most EV drivers charge at home, where electricity rates are lower than at public chargers and there is less competition for charging spots. In California, the leading state for EVs, 88% of early adopters of battery electric cars said they were able to charge at home, and workplace and public charging represented just 24% and 17% of their charging sessions, respectively. Nationwide, about 50% to 80% of all battery electric car charging sessions take place at home.

    Yet almost a quarter of all U.S. housing structures have more than one dwelling unit, according to the 2019 American Housing Survey. In California, 32.5% of urban dwellings have multiple units, and only a third of those units include access to a personal garage where a charger could be installed.

    Even if installing a personal charger is an option, it can be expensive in a multiunit dwelling if wiring isn’t already in place. And it often comes with other obstacles, including the potential need for electrical upgrades or challenges from homeowner association rules and restrictions. Installing chargers can involve numerous stakeholders who can impede the process – lot owners, tenants, homeowners associations, property managers, electric utilities and local governments.

    However, if a 240-volt outlet is already available, basic charger installation drops to a few hundred dollars.

    Right-to-charge laws aims for ubiquitous home charging

    Right-to-charge laws aim to streamline home charging access as new buildings go up.

    Illinois’ new Electric Vehicle Charging Act requires that 100% of parking spaces at new homes and multiunit dwellings be ready for electric car charging, with a conduit and reserved capacity to easily install charging infrastructure. The new law also gives renters and condominium owners in new buildings a right to install chargers without unreasonable restriction from landlords and homeowner associations.

    California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Oregon and Virginia also have right-to-charge laws designed to make residential community charging deployment easier, as do several U.S. cities including Seattle and Washington, D.C. Most apply only to owner-occupied buildings, but a few, including California’s and Colorado’s, also apply to rental buildings.

    Chicago officials have considered an ordinance that would include existing buildings, too.

    Sharing chargers can reduce the cost

    There are several steps communities can take to increase access to chargers and reduce the cost to residents.

    In a new study, colleagues and I looked at how to design shared charging for an apartment building with scheduling that works for everyone. By sharing chargers, residential communities can reduce the costs associated with charger installation and use.

    The biggest challenge to shared charging is often scheduling. We found that a centralized charging management system that suggests charging times for each electric car owner that aligns with the owner’s travel schedule and the amount of charge needed can work – with enough chargers.

    In a typical multiunit dwelling in Chicago – with an average of 14 cars in the parking lot – a small community charging hub with two level 2 chargers, the type common in homes and office buildings, can cover daily residential recharging demand at a cost of about 15 cents per kilowatt-hour. But having only two chargers means residents are waiting on average 2.2 hours to charge.

    A larger charging hub with eight level 2 chargers in the same city avoids the delay but increases the cost of charging to 21 cents per kWh because of upfront cost of purchasing and installing the chargers. To put that into context, the average electricity cost for Chicago residents is 16 cents per kWh.

    The future of charging management at multiunit dwellings will be automated for efficiency, with a computer or artificial intelligence determining the most efficient schedule for charging. Optimized scheduling can be responsive to the times renewable electricity generation sources are producing the most power – midday for solar energy, for example – and to dynamic electricity pricing. Automation can also eliminate delays for drivers while saving money and reducing the burden on the electric grid.

    The current limited access to home charging in many cities constrains electric vehicle adoption, slows down the decarbonization of U.S. transportation and exacerbates inequities in electric vehicle ownership. I believe efforts to expand charging in multidwelling buildings can help lift some of the biggest barriers and help reduce noise and pollution in urban cores at the same time.

    • Transport
    • Cities
    • Electricity
    • Electric vehicles
    • Urban
    • Housing
    • Chicago
    • EVs
    • Urban transport
    • Apartments
    • rights
    • Apartment buildings
    • Condos
    • Illinois
    • US cities
    • Electric vehicle policies
    • Battery electric vehicles
    • multi-unit residential buildings

    Ready hour solar charger

    On weekdays ordered before 21:00, we ship the same day. Depending on where you live, the package will be delivered within 5. 10 working days (after you receive the shipping confirmation email).

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    Product Description

    The Xtorm Solar Charger 5000 is a rugged outdoor solar charger, built to last. It gives you the freedom and energy to go anywhere you want, making it perfect for all your adventures.

    Powerful featuresThe solar charger is equipped with a 5000mAh lithium-polymer battery, powerful enough to charge a smartphone at least once. The Solar Charger itself can be recharged in two ways, either via USB-C or by simply taking it outside and let the built-in solar panel do its work.

    Made for adventureThe Solar Charger is splash-proof, drop-resistant, and has a powerful integrated LED flashlight, making it the perfect solar charger for all your outdoor adventures. With the large internal battery and powerful solar panel you will always have some extra energy at hand, wherever and whenever needed!

    A wide variety of factors have an impact on how fast the sun is able to recharge your Solar Charger, like the season, location, time of day, and of course cloudiness.

    To give you a clear picture how much free power you can expect from the built-in solar panel, we provide 2 different scenarios below to illustrate the difference in charging speed.

    How long it takes to fully recharge your Solar Charger:

    On a mostly sunny day in spring or summer fall, it takes around 6 days

    On a mostly sunny day in fall or winter, it takes around 12 days

    As you can see, we haven’t given an example of how long it takes to recharge on mostly cloudy days. This is because, unfortunately, solar charging is really not effective enough in these conditions.

    At Xtorm we use the high efficiency SunPower solar cells to provide as much power as possible from a small surface area. Are the charging times listed above not as fast as you would like? Don’t worry, at Xtorm we have solar chargers and panels in all sizes. Check out our other products to see which suits you best!

    Note: The wattage of the device you want to charge must be lower than the wattage of the product you are using to charge it. Devices with higher wattage, cannot be charged with this.

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