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4 Things You Need to Know When Reroofing Your Home with Solar Panels. Nulok solar panels

4 Things You Need to Know When Reroofing Your Home with Solar Panels. Nulok solar panels

    Things You Need to Know When Reroofing Your Home with Solar Panels

    Getting a new roof for your home is a major project as it is, and adding any additional obstacles or processes to it only makes the process even more involved. However, if you have solar panels on your roof, you’ll need to undergo at least two more additional steps for your roof replacement.

    This brings up a lot of questions from those who have solar energy systems constructed on their rooftop.

    • Will you have to remove your panels to replace your roof?
    • Will the roofers remove the panels, or do you have to call your solar installer to do it?
    • Can you build your solar mounting hardware directly into your new roof?

    In this blog, we’ll do our best to answer these and several other common questions you may have as well as tell you about four things you need to know about your roof replacement project.

    How to Replace Roof With Solar Panels

    #1: You’ll Have to Remove Your Solar Panels to Replace Your Roof

    There’s no way around it: your solar panels will have to come down to replace your roof. This means you’ll lose access to your renewable energy throughout the duration of your roof replacement, meaning for several days your home will rely entirely on utility grid power.

    That will drive costs up, so be prepared for a higher utility bill than usual. Your power will likely go down for at least a few minutes at a time during both your panel removal and reinstallation, so be prepared for outages.

    Here’s something else you’ll need to know: your roofers are not the ones who will remove your solar panels. Roofers generally don’t have the training or skill to properly handle a solar panel removal, so you’ll want to call your installers to have them take your panels down before your removal project gets started.

    Temporarily removing your panels will probably take at least a day, and reinstallation will probably take about a day as well. Plan on adding a couple of extra days to your replacement project to accommodate for your panel removal and installation.

    #2: Be Careful When Choosing Your New Roof Material

    When replacing your roof, you may be tempted to change to a new roof material. Whether it’s a more energy-efficient material, a more durable material, or a roofing material that’s more affordable, not all roof materials use the same solar mounting brackets.

    things, need, know, reroofing, your

    If you change materials, you may have to replace your mounting hardware, and that could add thousands of dollars to the overall cost of your project. Talk with your solar installers ahead of time to learn if your new roofing material can take advantage of your current mounting hardware, and arrange ahead of time to have your new mounting hardware delivered before your roof replacement is finished.

    That way you aren’t waiting around on another delivery in order to get your solar energy system reinstalled.

    #3: Choose Solar Installers and Roofers Who Will Work Together

    Your roofers and your solar may not be working directly with each other, but they’re both providing a service that directly impacts your home and the roof over your head, so you’ll likely need to do some work as a liaison between the two.

    Remember: you are in control over your project, and you should be able to say what gets done, how it gets done, and when. You can make your replacement a lot easier by choosing a roofer that’s willing to work directly with your solar installation company.

    Likewise, giving your solar installers the contact information of your roofing company and allowing the two providers to collaborate on your project will lead to a faster and less stressful project.

    #4: Avoid Extra Costs by Replacing Your Roof Before Installing Solar Panels

    Are you considering switching to solar energy? Many solar installers will actually ask if you have had your roof recently inspected to determine its overall health and quality before starting your project. The reason for this is simple: if your roof has less than five years of useful life left, your solar installer will probably inform you that you’re better off replacing your roof before installing solar.

    Removing your solar panels even temporarily can be costly, so avoiding this cost by replacing your roof in advance could wind up cutting thousands of dollars off of the cost of simply installing your panels now and then replacing your roof later.

    Looking to replace your roof in the Phoenix or Tucson area? If you have solar, turn to the roofing pros from Lyons Roofing by calling (520) 447-2522 or by sending us a message online! We work with solar installers and offer roofing repairs and replacements designed with your home and your energy system in mind.

    Is Tesla’s Solar Roof Fair Dinkum?

    Tesla’s solar roof tile announcement raises more questions than it answers.

    On Saturday the 29th of October, Elon Musk made an announcement that thousands of Australians were waiting to hear.

    He spent 37 seconds making that announcement.

    Then he spent most of the rest of the time spruiking Tesla’s new solar tiles.

    The concept of solar tiles is not new. Many companies have tried, and failed, to commercialise them. But then the same can be said for electric cars. So can Tesla make a success of their solar roof tiles?

    The Tesla solar tiles are designed for American homes and so aren’t as relevant for Australians as Tesla’s home energy storage. But building integrated solar photovoltaics – industry jargon for solar integrated into roofs, walls or Windows – certainly could become big in the future.

    In this post I’ll tell you everything I know about the Tesla tiles, which isn’t much. But one thing I do know is, they sure are purdy 1.

    The Feature Presentation

    “How do we have a solar roof that is better than a normal roof? That looks better, lasts longer, has better insulating effect, and the cost of roof plus electricity is less than that of a normal roof.”

    Thus spake Elon Musk before the crowd inside a fake American cul-de-sac 2. in Universal Studios, California. He held aloft examples of his solar tiles and told the gathering the houses around them had solar tile roofs.

    As he mentioned each house, its garage door opened and a Tesla electric car rolled out. I panicked a little when this first happened, as there was no one at the wheel and I thought Tesla was about to get some bad press from a car rolling into the crowd. But then I remembered they can drive themselves due to a sophisticated computer auto-pilot and not at all because of demonic possession.

    There were four different styles of solar glass tiles – textured, slate 3. smooth, and Tuscan.

    They all looked good to me. As far as I could tell, that is. I am no real judge of the attractiveness of American roofing material. My taste lies in a different direction. I love galvo or a nice bit of Colorbond. The subtle curves of a sheet of corrugated iron… that’s good looking roofing material as far as I’m concerned. Of course, we all have our individual tastes. I have a builder friend, Kal-El, whose weakness is masonite.

    things, need, know, reroofing, your

    But good looks alone will not be enough for Tesla solar tiles to be a success. Unfortunately, we have almost nothing but their looks to go on, as Elon gave almost no technical information. I can tell you they face some challenges, as building integrated solar hasn’t been a success so far.

    Building Integrated PV Is Not New

    Sticking solar cells into roofing material is not a new thing. Companies have been doing it for years. While there is definitely a market for it, it is only a very small market at the moment as it has never really taken off.

    The logic behind it is pretty solid and basically involves killing two birds with one stone. Why spend time and resources installing two things, a roof and solar panels, when you can do both at the same time? Solar panels are definitely tough enough to be roofing material. They have to be to survive hail pounding into them, not to mention all the stones from people trying to kill two birds. And its appearance can be preferred.

    But no one has been able to get the cost of solar roofing material below that of retrofitting solar panels onto a roof. So far building integrated solar has only gotten by on its looks and I think it will only continue to get by on only its looks for quite some time, as it faces a number of challenges.

    Solar Tiles Are Less Efficient

    One issue building integrated solar has is lower efficiency. There are three main causes:

    • gaps between solar cells.
    • Pretty coatings reduces light reaching solar cells.
    • Lack of air circulation means they get hotter than conventional panels.

    Gaps

    When looking at the very pretty Tesla solar tiles, it is obvious the actual solar cells take up less space per square meter than in a conventional solar panel, which means lower efficiency. This is not necessarily a problem, provided a roof is large enough to generate the electricity desired. And since it would be technically possible to cover the entire roof surface with solar tiles this may compensate for the efficiency loss.

    Pretty Coatings

    If you make solar cells look pretty by covering them with something that isn’t completely transparent, then that will block some of the light falling on them. Tesla’s approach to this problem is to use micro-louvers which are an extremely fine grid built into the solar tiles. When viewed from a low angle this grid is visible, which makes the tile look pretty, while from a higher angle the solar cells, or cell if it is one large one, becomes visible.

    Musk says this coating only reduces efficiency by 2%. That’s extremely impressive. If he instead meant to say 2 percentage points then it would reduce output by around 12%, which six times less impressive 4.

    Light gets all quantumy when it hits a very fine grid, so it is possible it may only reduce efficiency by 2% when light is shining directly on it. But I find it hard to see how it would not reduce output when sunlight is hitting it at a low angle. Maybe they decided that since output won’t be high anyway at those times, it’s not a great loss. But if you are trying to maximise self consumption, the morning and evening sunlight can be the most valuable sunlight of all.

    Unfortunately, we won’t actually know how they perform until someone actually gets their hands on one and tries it out. I know that if I had been at the presentation I would have used a trained monkey to snag one off a roof. The fact that no one in the crowd attempted this makes me wonder if Americans even deserve monkeys at all.

    They Will Get Hot

    Normal solar panels help keep the roof they are on cool and reduce air conditioner use. This is because they shade the roof and there is a gap below them that lets air circulate and prevents hot panels from directly transferring their heat.

    This air gap is pretty important. Under extreme conditions panels without one can get up to 20 degrees hotter. This is enough to reduce the performance of a typical panel by about 8%. Overall, I would expect the efficiency loss from solar tiles not having an air gap to average around 4% or less.

    Solar Tiles May Turn Your Roof Space Into A Greenhouse

    The solar tiles are tinted glass and so significantly transparent to light. When Musk held one up his fingers were visible through it. This means that when installed, because of the gaps between solar cells, a considerable portion of the roof will consist of this glass letting light in which will turn the roof space into a greenhouse. I wonder if this is the, “…better insulating effect,” Musk referred to?

    They build roofs differently in America, so this greenhouse effect may be less of a problem for them. But in Australia extra ventilation could be required to stop the house turning into a sauna in the summer and further reducing solar tile performance.

    Tesla Solar Tiles Appear Tough

    Musk showed slow motion footage of a heavy weight smashing normal roof tiles and bouncing off a Tesla solar tile. Since I’m pretty sure he didn’t take advantage of his rocketry side business to nip off to mars and film it in the lower gravity there, the solar tiles seem pretty tough.

    With the right manufacturing techniques, glass can be made extremely tough. If you don’t believe me, go out and smash your mobile phone with a hammer right now 5. Double glass solar panels consist of two glass sheets only 5mm thick in total and can withstand impacts from golf ball sized hail. Solarwatt double glass panels only total 4mm. The solar tiles Musk held up looked about one centimeter thick, so I could probably bang my head against them all day without damage 6. Of course, the actual production tiles may be thinner if they decide to save on material.

    We Have No Idea How The Solar Tiles Actually Work

    The arse-sack 7 houses the Tesla solar tiles were mounted on weren’t actually real houses, but sets at Universal Studios. And, as befitting of the location, they were fake solar tile installations and not actually wired up to provide electricity.

    How they actually will be wired up, I have no idea. Will each one operate independently or, more likely, will multiple tiles be wired into units resembling the output of a normal solar panel? At the moment we just don’t know.

    Having spent a fair portion of my life in a roof space, I can tell you we should have a much easier time wiring solar tiles together than Americans will. We hang our tiles on an open frame while they normally put theirs on top of solid material, so how they’ll manage to wire theirs up or troubleshoot problems is beyond my comprehension.

    The Fake Houses Had Massive Shading Issues

    What I do know is the solar tiles on the roofs we were shown had massive shading problems. I’m not talking about the trees around them, but the houses themselves casting shadows on the solar tiles. Upper floors cast shadows on tiles at a lower level. Attic Windows cast shadows on tiles. Chimneys cast shadows on tiles. Basically it was Shadowpalooza. Depending on how the tiles are installed, those shadows could cause huge output losses.

    When describing one roof, Musk mentioned half the tiles were solar while the other half were not. In a real installation, solar tiles may be placed on parts of a roof that get plenty of sunshine, while non-solar ones may be placed in areas that get shade.

    Shading problems could also be minimized by wiring groups of tiles to microinverters so each group would operate independently and shaded groups would not affect the performance of others. Another option would be to use DC optimization, potentially of the sort made by Maxim Integrated.

    Who Will Perform The Installations?

    I presume that in order to bung these solar tiles on a roof, a solar installer would have to work with roofers and develop a whole new set of roofing skills. They would have to become some sort of super being that is more than a roofer and more than a solar installer and more than a mere fusion of the two!

    But solar installers are already superheroes, so they probably won’t have too much trouble with that.

    There Will Be Time Between Installation And Getting Power

    When a home is being built the roof will generally go on months before it is complete. This means there will be an extended period of time where the solar roof will be paid for but probably not producing electricity. This is a minor problem in the vast scheme of things, but it is something to be taken into account.

    Tesla Isn’t Competing On Price

    Tesla is a company that became famous by taking electric cars and making them flash and fantastic and expensive. Or at least expensive to begin with. I am certain Tesla is attempting to do the same with building integrated photovoltaics. Their current solar tiles are not meant for people who are happy with nice bit of 22 a square meter colorbond on their roof. They are for people who have lots of money and like to spend it on fancy things. And since fancy people are going to spend money on fancy things no matter what I do, I’m glad they’ll have the opportunity to spend it on some fancy solar tiles rather than a gold-plated diesel generator or a platinum proletariat powered hamster wheel.

    When Can I Get Some?

    Tesla says their solar tiles will start to be available in 9 months, so I guess they’re only a little bit pregnant at the moment. But as for when they might be available in Australia, your guess is as good as mine. If Tesla gives me a date 8. I’ll let you know. But getting them to meet Australian standards and be suitable for installation here is probably a hurdle Tesla won’t be willing to jump for quite some time.

    Tesla Has No Advantage In Solar Tiles – And No Disadvantage

    Manufacturing solar roof tiles is not an industry that faces significant barriers to entry. That’s economist talk for the fact there are dozens of companies that could start making solar tiles right now if they wanted to. Tesla has no special advantage in this field apart from the ability to slap their brand name on the tiles.

    But brand recognition is not a bad thing to have, and while Tesla has no special advantages when it comes to solar tiles, there is no special reason why they can’t make a success of it. But what they may not be able to do is make a huge amount of money, as there is nothing to stop competitors from moving in if it takes off and Tesla tries to keep their high.

    Building Integrated Solar Will Catch On Eventually

    As the cost of solar PV falls it will become less expensive to integrate it into roofing materials, and barring disaster, people will be richer in the future and have more money to spend on things such as making their roofs look pretty. So I think building integrated solar will eventually catch on. I just have no idea if Tesla will be the first company to succeed at it.

    Maybe if they did a nice solar colorbond I’d be more optimistic.

    The Danger Of Building Integrated Solar

    One fear I have is that if building integrated solar starts to catch on it will be the only form of solar allowed in some areas, slowing the rate at which we install clean solar generating capacity. I have nothing against making things look pretty, but I think atmospheric CO2 concentration should be falling at a Rapid clip and be below what it was in 1970 before we start worrying too much about looks.

    Footnotes

    • I have been informed “purdy” is not a word and is not used by Americans anywhere. At all. I have been further informed the word I should be using is “pretty”. ↩
    • French for “arse-sack.” ↩
    • By slate, I mean the actual stone slate, because Americans sometimes make roofs out of rocks. And here you were thinking The Flintstones was just fiction. ↩
    • I’m sure that’s how maths works. ↩
    • Yeah… you probably shouldn’t have believed me. ↩
    • And after some of the stuff I’ve said about Tesla, they might be tempted to add that to their testing procedure ↩
    • Literal English translation of “cul-de-sac”. Have I laboured that fact enough now? ↩
    • If Tesla gives me a date, I expect flowers, dinner, and a movie. ↩

    Solar tiles: Advantages, examples, and costs in the UK

    As part of the energy transition, solar panels are increasingly common across the UK. The technology is becoming both more affordable and more efficient for producing renewable energy. However, an even newer technology, known as solar tiles, has gained popularity in recent times and is in some cases seen as an excellent alternative to conventional solar panels. In this article, we’ll provide you with a complete guide to solar tiles.

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    What are solar roof tiles?

    Solar roof tiles, also known as photovoltaic roof tiles, are a way of integrating solar energy into your homes without really altering the look of your property. While installing solar panels is popular in the UK as it helps reduce your carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions as well as reduce your electricity bill, the biggest complaint about them is that they are large and can make buildings look ugly.

    Solar tiles, however, replace traditional roof tiles. Essentially, they are roof tiles with solar panels. They actually work in exactly the same way as solar panels. through the use of semi-conducting materials and using sunlight to create an electric field.

    Can solar tiles be used to heat water? Solar tiles can be used to generate electricity for your lights and to power your appliances in your home. And in good news, they can also be used to heat water. if you have an immersion heater for your water tank.

    Solar tiles vs panels: What’s the difference?

    There are actually five main differences between the two, even though they do exactly the same job:

    • Solar panels are mounted on the roof whereas solar roof tiles sit alongside traditional roof tiles;
    • Solar tiles for roof are a relatively new concept in the UK meaning they are not widely available yet;
    • And that has an impact on price. they are more expensive than solar panels;
    • Solar panels can be installed on an existing roof while solar roof tiles can’t. they replace traditional roof tiles;
    • Solar panels often can not be installed on listed or historic buildings whereas solar roof tiles can.

    Solar roof tiles: What are the advantages?

    As with choosing any new feature that will alter your home, solar roof tiles have their advantages and disadvantages. Some of the main advantages include:

    • Sleek and stylish: They have a very stylish appearance and will not alter the look of your home too much compared to solar panels. Opting for solar roof tiles will allow you to start doing your bit to reverse climate change and use a green energy source, without anyone even noticing;
    • Allows older buildings to also switch to green energy: Many historic and listed buildings in the UK are unable, by law, to be altered either structurally or aesthetically, meaning solar panels are not an option. Solar tiles open the possibility of allowing listed buildings to also use renewable or green energy sources. something that would be of huge benefit as the nation looks to cut carbon emissions to become carbon neutral by 2050;
    • Increased durability: British weather can wreak havoc with standard roof tiles. they wear down and need replacing after a while. And with weather patterns changing due to global warming, another advantage of solar roof tiles is that they are designed and manufactured to be more durable. meaning no leaky roofs, and no need to replace the tiles for many decades.

    What are the disadvantages of solar tiles for roof?

    There are, however, some downsides to installing solar roof tiles, including:

    • Lower efficiency: As technology improves things may change, but currently, solar roof tiles are around 8-15% less efficient than solar panels, according to Deege Solar. a UK-based solar panel and tile installer. That means homeowners and business owners will pay more to generate less electricity;
    • Higher costs: As mentioned, the switch to solar roof tiles will see homeowners pay more because they are more expensive to install. Currently, you should expect to pay around double to install solar roof tiles compared to solar panels;
    • Long installation times: Because solar roof tiles replace traditional roof tiles, the installation process can be lengthy;
    • Limited availability: Solar roof tiles are a fairly new concept in the UK, meaning there are currently few companies providing installation services. As their popularity takes off, that should hopefully change.

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    What are the best solar roof tiles?

    It’s hard to say which are the best solar roof tiles in the UK at the moment because the market is fairly small and there aren’t that many companies offering them. What we can do though is give you an overview of the companies that do offer solar roof tile installation and let you choose which one you think is best for your needs.

    Tesla roof tiles: Are they available in the UK? Electric car maker, Tesla, has also branched out in recent years to other areas of the renewable energy market, and does actually manufacture solar tiles. Despite various dates announced to launch in the UK, it keeps getting pushed back, and as of now, they are still unavailable in the UK.

    GB Sol solar roof tiles

    The solar PV tiles available through GB Sol are manufactured in Wales. The tiles are designed to integrate with not just terracotta roof tiles but slate roofs as well, which can sometimes be more difficult to get planning permission for.

    Solecco solar roof tiles

    Based in Leeds, Solecco offers two types of solar tiles: black mono-crystalline and red terracotta polycrystalline solar tiles. Something that sets them apart from the rest is the fact that the tiles are made from recycled plastic, meaning you can actually have an even bigger impact on the environment should you opt for these tiles. The company estimates their tiles last an average of 30 years.

    Nulok solar roof tiles

    Nulok tiles are widely available across the UK and other parts of the world including Europe, the US, and Australia. For every 1Kw installed on a roof they generate an average of 3.7kWh.

    Solar roof tiles: UK cost

    As a relatively new technology in the UK, solar tiles for roof can be fairly expensive. According to Checkatrade.com, they can cost around double what you’d pay for solar panel installation. There are a number of reasons behind this, including the longer installation time as it is a more complicated process.

    The actual cost of the installation will depend on factors such as:

    Because of their high cost, it is recommended that solar roof tiles be installed on new builds or home renovation projects.

    In our table below, you can get an idea of how much you should expect to pay if you opt for solar roof tiles.

    Size Average solar tile cost Average cost of labour Total cost 1kW

    2kW

    3kW

    4kW

    £5,500 – £7,000 £1,800 £8,050
    £7,000 – £9,000 £1,900 £9,900
    £10,000 – £12,000 £2,000 £13,000
    £12,000 – £16,000 £2,200 £16,200

    Are there any government grants available? While the Government does provide a Green Homes Grant of up to £10,000 for energy-saving alterations to homes, unfortunately, solar tiles are not covered by the grant. However, energy regulator, Ofgem, does provide a Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI) in which homeowners can earn money by selling any excess electricity back to the national grid. If you fulfil the criteria, you should be quick to apply as the scheme will close to new applicants on 31 March, 2022.

    Check out our guides and advice for more information on what changes you can make to help protect the environment.

    Tesla Solar Roof – Everything You Need To Know About Solar Roof Tiles

    Since Tesla announced their range of solar panel roof tiles and their vision of a fully integrated solar roof in 2016, we are often asked about the pros and cons of this new technology.

    We have had a look at many of the major brands and solar panel roof tiles, including those from Tesla, Monier, and Tractile and have put our findings below. Here’s everything you need to know about solar roof tiles.

    What are solar tiles?

    Solar tiles are roof tiles that work as solar panels. They have all the functions of roof tiles like waterproofing your home, while also generating electricity.

    Each tile has a photovoltaic cell (PV Cell) embedded in it, and they are wired up through the rooftop to a centralised inverter.

    things, need, know, reroofing, your

    This is generally referred to as BIPV (Building Integrated PV).

    What do solar panel roof tiles cost in Australia?

    The first thing to understand is that when you install solar roof-tiles, you are in essence installing an entirely new roof – so they only make sense if you are building a new house or completely replacing your existing roof.

    As you would expect, solar roof tiles are considerably more expensive than standard roof tiles and much, much more expensive than a standard solar system.

    In addition to this, the installation of a solar roof isn’t just a quick panel installation. It involves removing and replacing part of your roof. It’s many times more expensive than a standard solar system.

    A roof tile solar system is upwards of 5 times the cost of regular solar.

    of BIPV are reducing, of course, but standard solar PV Systems have also dropped dramatically. A 4kw integrated system will cover a huge chunk out your roof, whereas you could choose a much simpler and efficient regular solar system for a tiny fraction of the cost.

    Are solar tiles available in Australia yet?

    Yes – there are a number of manufacturers offering these products, including Monier, Tractile and others.

    At the time of writing, the Tesla roof tiles are not yet available in Australia, although you can pay a deposit to be in line for when they do eventually start to sell in Australia.

    What is the advantage of solar roof tiles and why would I buy them?

    These panels aren’t the most cost-effective option for electricity generation but there’s no doubt that if you can afford them purely for their aesthetic value, one could consider them as an option.

    What are the disadvantages of solar roof tiles?

    There are major disadvantages to solar roof tiles which means they are not for everyone.

    Firstly, as mentioned above, they are very expensive. And if the aesthetics of your roof are worth a lot to you, then solar roof tiles could be a great option. However, for the rest of us, the extra cost is rarely justified.

    The next important point is that the solar roof tiles are, compared to today’s latest solar panels, nowhere near as efficient. For a standard 10kW solar system, solar roof tiles require around 100 square meters of clear roof space, as compared to around 40 square metres for a standard PV System. In other words, if roof space is at a premium, you are getting less than half the output per square metre.

    This means that a solar roof tile solar system will, for most households, be unlikely to be large enough to meet their current and future energy needs.

    Another factor to consider is that it would be impractical to add extra capacity to a solar roof tile system, meaning that if your needs change, your solar system can’t.

    One other minor point that many people consider is that mounting a standard solar system a few centimetres above your roof provides a degree of insulation (and cooling) by keeping the direct sun off your rooftop.

    So should I get solar roof tiles?

    Solar roof tiles are a product for a niche market – in particular, those where roof aesthetics are really important, and when the cost isn’t a major factor.

    However, if you’re getting solar to generate savings for your electricity bills, or to support your household’s energy needs today and into the future, a solar roof will likely be an expensive choice for you.

    What are solar roof tiles and are they worth investing in?

    Current solar power arrays turn some people off on houses because of how visible they are. These panels really stand out, and that is a deal-breaker for some homeowners who invest a lot of time, money and energy into making their property look a certain way.

    Well, these more ‘traditional’ solar panels may soon be a thing of the past because of a technology called building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) – roof tiles that integrate seamlessly with your current tiles but harness the power of the sun in the same way as solar panels.

    Tesla is leading the way with solar roof tiles.

    Renewable energy innovation and technology giants Tesla are at the forefront of BIPV technology with their Solar Roof. This features ultra-stylish, textured black tiles for your roof that include a 25 year for warranty for the tile itself, its ability to draw power from the sun and any damage caused by the weather. The system is also able to be fully integrated with the Powerwall home battery to ensure you always have reliable power, even when there are mainstream grid outages.

    But Tesla isn’t the only player in this space, with plenty of options available right now including tiles from Tractile, Bristile, Nulok and Monier.

    Solar roof tiles are better against the elements.

    Not only do solar roof tiles look better aesthetically, but they are also more resistant to high winds, storms and tropical cyclones. You don’t need to drill holes in your roof to install solar roof tiles, and they are even more resistant to hail damage than conventional roof tiles.

    The Tesla roof tiles, for example, have a hail rating up to 1.75″ diameter, a wind rating up to 267kph (only a category five cyclone can exceed this) and the best fire rating of any roof rile.

    Can you walk on them?

    When you are installing technology into your roof tiles, there can also come an assumption that these tiles are now weak or brittle. But no, you can walk on them – they can take much more force than your size 10 Dunlop Volleys can deliver. To prove this, Elon Musk recently dropped a pumpkin from two stories onto his roof tiles to stress test them. The pumpkin lost. Seriously.

    How much do solar roof riles cost?

    The bottom line is that these solar tiles are going to cost more than regular panels. But how much more? Tesla made their solar tiles available to Australians by order in 2019, and you need to contact them for a quote. We are going to say the average cost of installing solar panels, including an inverter, is around 5,500. However, we always encourage you to talk to our team to get the best possible quote for your needs.

    Solar tiles, once fully installed, cost between 13,000 and 18,000 and offer different power ratings and efficiencies, so ensure you are doing your homework there. If you are willing to invest, there are plenty of benefits that can be enjoyed for the long-term, and it’s something you’ll thank yourself for later.

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