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18Kw solar system. 18kw solar system

18Kw solar system. 18kw solar system

    Off Grid Solar System Cost (What Can You Expect to Pay?)

    Taking your home completely off-grid with solar is a much more involved and expensive of a process than many people first think. The setup requires various different components, some of which are much more complex than the more common grid-tied solar installation. However, going completely off-grid with solar may be the only viable solution for a home that’s located in the middle of nowhere, or when the owner wants to rely solely on their own energy solutions. If this sounds like you, you may be curious about how much off grid solar system cost? Assuming electric consumption is that of the U.S. national average, an off-grid solar system would cost between 30,392 – 48,048. The major price fluctuation is largely due to battery bank type, with LFP batteries costing much more than flooded lead-acid. Lastly, before we continue going into detail on each off-grid solar system component and its cost, we need to make sure you understand something. Solar system cost is largely dictated by 3 things. Your country, peak sun hours, and electricity consumption. The average price we gave above assumes you live in the United States. Costs in Australia for example would be much different.

    What Components Are Typically Used in an Off grid Solar Power System?

    In this section we will outline all the different components that make up an off-grid solar system and how each will influence the overall cost of your system. Keep in mind each component that makes up an off-grid solar system varies in cost based on its size and brand. For example, if your home uses a lot of electricity it is going to need a larger-sized battery bank to offset your consumption on overcast days. The larger the battery bank, the higher the costs. We will factor in location in the next section, here we want to talk about each of the main components that make up an off-grid solar system and what you can expect their costs to be.

    #2 Charge Controller

    Charge controllers regulate the rate at which electric current is added to or drawn from the electric batteries.

    The type/power rating of these devices generally determines the price.

    We recommend installing MPPT charge controllers, Victron is a fantastic brand.

    #3 Hybrid Power Inverter

    Inverters are pretty much the life force behind your off-grid solar system. Without them, your setup won’t work.

    They essentially transform the DC electricity from your batteries into useable AC electricity which you can use to power your appliances around the house.

    #4 Battery Bank

    Perhaps the most expensive component of your entire off-grid solar system setup.

    Battery banks are one of the defining components of an off-grid solar system.

    They allow your home to be powered during periods of overcast conditions or at night time.

    Battery technology is still quite expensive, particularly lithium-ion technology.

    For the most part we have covered the main components in an off-grid solar system.

    However, there are of course a few more smaller components that will add to your cost. We have chosen to leave them out as they really all depend on the individual setup.

    Off Grid Solar Systems: Estimated Costs Table

    Solar Panels 5,000. 30,000
    Charge Controller 50. 1,000
    Hybrid Inverter 3,000. 13,000
    Battery Bank 10,000. 30,000
    Total 18,050. 74,000

    The overall cost of your system really all comes down to what size you have installed.

    The larger the size the more expensive.

    The size you require all comes down to your energy consumption and your offset requirements.

    For this reason we have included averages instead of exact amounts as the cost of an off-grid solar system varies way too much person to person.

    Solar Tax Credits

    One perk available to those of you who live in the U.S. is the solar tax credit. Our averages do not take into account your ability to claim solar incentives for your solar installation.

    Congress passed an extension of the ITC, which provides a 26% tax credit for systems installed in 2020-2022, and 22% for systems installed in 2023. (Systems installed before December 31, 2019 were eligible for a 30% tax credit.) The tax credit expires starting in 2024 unless Congress renews it Energy.Gov

    Taking these credits into consideration, our average amounts get reduced to:

    Off Grid Solar Systems: Complete Costs Table

    System Size (kW) Daily Production Estimate Approximate Price Range (before 26% federal tax credit)
    1.30 kW Daily Summer: 5.80 Daily Winter: 2.90 Price: 8,349. 14,220
    2.90 kW Daily Summer: 13.00 Daily Winter: 6.50 Price: 11,559. 16,921
    3.80 kW Daily Summer: 17.30 Daily Winter: 8.60 Price: 13,916. 23,571
    4.80 kW Daily Summer: 21.60 Daily Winter: 10.80 Price: 15,634. 25,289
    5.80 kW Daily Summer: 25.90 Daily Winter: 13.00 Price: 18,303. 27,958
    6.40 kW Daily Summer: 28.80 Daily Winter: 14.40 Price: 22,654. 32,699
    7.70 kW Daily Summer: 34.60 Daily Winter: 17.30 Price: 24,451. 34,496
    9.60 kW Daily Summer: 43.20 Daily Winter: 21.60 Price: 33,462. 54,111
    10.20 kW Daily Summer: 46.10 Daily Winter: 23.00 Price: 32,065. 48,565
    11.50 kW Daily Summer: 51.80 Daily Winter: 25.90 Price: 32,815. 53,464
    12.80 kW Daily Summer: 57.60 Daily Winter: 28.80 Price: 35,653. 52,154
    14.40 kW Daily Summer: 64.80 Daily Winter: 32.40 Price: 47,263. 76,984
    17.30 kW Daily Summer: 77.80 Daily Winter: 38.90 Price: 51,180. 80,900

    (Table courtesy of Unbound Solar)

    You may use the above table to figure out your estimated costs based on your homes solar requirements.

    Final Off Grid Power Thoughts

    Understanding the costs involved with your off-grid solar system is the first step in figuring out whether this is a viable option for your household.

    An off-grid solar system may allow you to live in more isolated areas, ones closer to nature without grid-tied electricity supply.

    This in itself would generally reduce the overall purchase cost of your household. Perhaps this is some incentive to justify the large cost of an off-grid solar system.

    FAQ

    Is Off Grid solar expensive? Off-grid solar systems are expensive. A solar panel setup that supplies all the energy needs of a home tends to be very expensive. Compared to a grid-connected solar system, an off-grid solar system requires more panels, an inverter with a higher voltage capacity, and a large amount of solar battery storage.

    Does solar increase home value? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) found that every dollar saved on energy through solar increases home value by 20. That’s a return on investment of 20 to 1 According to Zillow, homes with solar panels sell for approximately 4 percent higher on average than homes without solar energy.

    How much does a 100kW solar system cost? The average commercial solar panel cost for 100kW solar system in the US is about 325,000 with average ranging from 50,000 for a 25kW system to 600,000 for a 250kW solar system.

    Portable Solar-Powered Charging Lockers. Convenient Power On-the-Go

    Picture this: you’re hiking up a mountain, taking breathtaking photos of the view and candid snapshots with your friends, when suddenly, your phone.

    Understanding Renewable Energy: Types Benefits

    In this article, we will provide a detailed breakdown of the various types of renewable energy sources, their advantages and disadvantages, and the.

    Understanding Net Metering its Benefits For Solar Energy Users

    In this article, we’ll delve into the details of this policy, exploring the potential benefits and drawbacks for individuals and businesses. We’ll.

    The Importance of Reducing Our Reliance on Fossil Fuels

    In this article, we will explore why reducing our reliance on fossil fuels is essential and how we can go about doing so in the first place.

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    May Constructions

    18kW Commercial Solar Installation

    Case Study

    May Constructions are a commercial contracting and development group. As an Australian company for the past 25 years, they understand the importance of operating efficiently and reducing their impact on the environment. This has led to the installation of a commercial solar system to save on energy and operating costs thus benefiting May Constructions, and the customers they serve. Commercial solar is an affordable energy option that creates a sustainable future.

    Given the ever increasing cost of power, May Constructions called on Solar Link Australia’s expertise to provide a power saving Solar Power Solution. May Constructions elected to install 70 Solar PV Modules for 18kW solar system. The panels have a positive tolerance providing reliable output and a guaranteed tolerance of 3%. They also have high module efficiency of up to 15.22%. over, they are certified to withstand 2400 Pa of wind and snow loads of up to 5400P as well as withstand a direct hail hit due to its tempered glass cover that is tested to TUV Standards (25mm diameter ice ball at 23.0m/s), keeping users worry-free at times of harsh weather.

    SMA Inverters are German made and built to precision. They are robust in their build offer unmatched after sales technical support. Furthermore, with inbuilt comms functionality, May Constructions’ Solar power investment can be monitored via phone, tablet or laptop from anywhere in the world with a simple login.

    Solar Link Australia is proud to supply install the industry’s leading solar brands to May Constructions. Now they will not only save money by using solar but will also lead the way in their social and corporate responsibility to reduce its own carbon footprint.

    • 18kW System Size
    • 1 x SMA 3-Phase Inverter, 70 x 260W Solar Panels
    • Malvern, Victoria
    • 26 Megawatts Annual Production
    • 27 Tonnes/year C02 Emission Savings
    • 4 Years Return of Investments

    How Long Can Solar Battery Power a House During an Outage?

    When you install a home battery, what you are really doing is providing your home with a backup energy reserve in the case of an outage.

    Whether you have a solar panel system at your home or not, a home battery can be used to store electricity and deliver it to your home appliances and devices. The benefits of a home battery are clear, especially during short or long-term outages, or in areas with Time-of-Use (TOU) rates that make electricity more expensive during peak use hours.

    In this article, we’ll show you how to calculate how long a battery paired with solar can power your house during a power outage, and give you some tips for maximizing your battery usage.

    How long can a solar battery power a house?

    Without running AC or electric heat, a 10 kWh battery alone can power the basic operations of a house for at least 24 hours, and longer with careful budgeting. When paired with solar, battery storage can power more electrical systems and provide backup electricity for even longer.

    In fact, a recent study by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory found that when heating and cooling are excluded:

    “(A) small PVESS with just 10 kWh of storage (at the lower end of sizes currently observed in the market) can fully meet backup needs over a 3-day outage in virtually all U.S. counties and any month of the year.”

    PVESS stands for photovoltaics and energy storage system.

    18kw, solar, system

    But exactly how long you can power your home with solar battery storage varies for each home and depends on three main things:

    • Your battery storage capacity
    • The output of your solar system
    • Your electricity needs during an outage

    We’ll show you how to budget your electricity to meet your solar and battery capacity below. First, let’s start with identifying your battery storage capacity.

    Home battery capacity

    Capacity — the amount of energy a battery can story — is one of the main features that influence how long a battery can power a house during a power outage.

    Battery storage capacity is measured in kilowatt hours (kWh) and can vary from as little as 1 kWh to over 10 kWh. Multiple batteries can be combined together to add even more capacity, but a 10 kWh home battery is typical for most homes.

    Check out this video to know more about Kilowatt hours (kWh).

    During a power outage, assuming you have a fully charged home battery, you will be able to use most of the 10 kWh of stored energy. You’ll want to leave a minimum charge of 5-10% on your battery for a couple main reasons:

    • To maintain the health of your battery
    • To start your solar inverters in the morning so you can recharge your battery with solar power

    For a 10 kWh battery, you’ll want to leave at least 0.5 kWh of capacity in reserve at all times. That leaves you with 9.5 kWh to power your home during a power outage.

    On it’s own, 9.5 kWh of battery storage can power essential electrical systems for a day or two. But central air conditioning uses around 3 kWh per hour, which would eat up the entire battery in just over three hours. Let’s see pairing battery with solar can expand your options during a power outage.

    Solar system output

    The beauty of pairing battery storage with solar is that you essentially create your own miniature utility to power your home. This is especially useful during prolonged power outages because unless you have battery storage, your solar system will be turned off by the local utility to prevent the backflow of electricity from injuring workers trying to repair the grid.

    But if you have battery storage, your system can operate independently when the grid is down. This is called “islanding.”

    How electricity does a solar system produce?

    Solar panel systems are measured in kilowatts (kW) that represent the amount of energy the system can produce in an hour of peak sunlight. So a 5 kW solar system can produce 5 kWh of electricity per hour in ideal conditions. But since conditions aren’t always ideal, we typically assume a performance ratio of 75%.

    The average number of peak sunlight hours per day varies from 3.5 to 5.5 in the US. Multiple the system capacity by sunlight hours and 0.75 to find the daily output of a solar system.

    For example, here’s how you would find the daily output of a 5 kW solar system getting 4.5 peak sunlight hours per day equals:

    5 kW solar system x 4.5 sunlight hours per day x 0.75 performance rating = 16.875 kWh per day

    In many cases, that’s more than enough to power essential electrical systems and recharge a 10 kW battery to use overnight. But electricity needs vary from home to home, so let’s run through a some common appliances and how much energy they use.

    18kw, solar, system

    Your electricity needs during a power outage

    How long solar battery storage can run your home depends how much electricity you use. And how much electricity you use depends on which appliances and systems you’re running.

    During a power outage, it’s recommended to budget electricity for the most necessary things first and then make a plan for the remainder capacity. For many homeowners, the list of priorities includes:

    • Refrigerator
    • Kitchen and cooking
    • Water heating
    • Lights
    • TV and device charging
    • Heating and cooling

    Now, heating and cooling is last on the list not because it isn’t important, but because these operations take so much electricity they’ll likely have to be limited regardless of your battery capacity. So the wise move here is to budget your essentials first, and then get a sense of how much battery capacity is left for heating and cooling.

    Note: If you have a gas furnace, you won’t need much electricity to keep the heat on.

    Let’s run through an example scenario of powering essential systems during a 24-hour power outage to get an idea of how much solar and battery capacity you’ll need.

    Use the tables below as an a la carte menu to create your own battery storage budget.

    Refrigerator: 1.5 kWh per day

    Model Energy use
    “>Older 15-cubic foot unit (1996) “>5 kWh per day
    “>Newer ENERGY STAR 17-cubic foot unit “>1.16 kWh per day

    A refrigerator is among most important things to power during an outage so that you can avoid having your food and drink go to waste.

    If you have a modern, energy star approved model, your refrigerator is using around 1-2 kWh of electricity a day. If your fridge lived through Y2K, you might be looking at closer to 5 kWh per day.

    Refrigerator electricity usage can be minimized by opening the door less and raising the temperature slightly. If you are preparing for a planned Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS), set the temperature very low before the shutoff event, and then set it to a higher temperature once the grid power goes out. That way the fridge starts cold and you can devote less battery capacity to power it during the outage.

    Let’s say you have a relatively modern ENERGY STAR certified fridge that uses 1.5 kWh per day.

    Running total: 1.5 kWh

    Kitchen and cooking: 1 kWh per day

    Appliance Energy use
    “>Electric oven “>2.3 kWh per hour
    “>Oven: surface “>1.1.5 kWh per hour
    “>Microwave oven “>0.12 kWh per 5 minutes
    “>Coffee maker “>

    Even during a power outage, people gotta eat. And in a large enough outage, it may not be practical to eat out or order delivery.

    Let’s say you make a pot of coffee and toast in the morning (0.2 kWh), microwaved some leftovers for lunch (.12 kWh), and baked a frozen pizza for dinner (0.75 kWh) because your trying to clear out the freezer. That amounts to just over 1 kWh throughout the day.

    Running total: 2.5 kWh

    Electric water heating: 2.5 kWh a day

    Appliance Energy use
    “>Electric water heater “>4-5 kWh per day (running 2-3 hours)
    “>Heat pump water heater (50-75 gallon) “>~2.5 kWh per day

    Water heating accounts for an average of 18% of the total energy used in the household. or around 162 kWh per month. On a normal day, a water heater runs for around 2 to 3 hours a day, which means that it will consume roughly 4-5 kWh of electricity a day. Heat pump water heaters are more efficient and can run on around 2.5 kWh per day.

    But power outages are not normal days. To save electricity, you may want to skip or shorten your shower, wash your hands and rise your dishes with cold water, and hold off on laundry for a day or two.

    And if you have a gas-powered water heater, water heating is a non-issue in terms of battery use.

    But for the sake of argument, let’s say you put on some extra deodorant and limit your water heating use to 2.5 kWh per day.

    Running total: 5 kWh

    Lights: 1 kWh per day

    Bulb type Energy use
    CFL/LED (8 W) equivalent to 25 W incandescent 0.008 kWh per hour
    CFL/LED (15 W) equivalent to 60 W incandescent 0.015 kWh per hour
    CFL/LED (27 W) equivalent to 100 W incandescent 0.027 kWh per hour
    CFL/LED (38 W) equivalent to 150 W incandescent 0.038 kWh per hour

    Compared to larger appliances, lights require very little electricity, especially if you have compact fluorescent (CFL) or LED bulbs. Even at the high end, a 38W LED bulb or 150 W incandescent bulb uses just 0.038 kWh per hour.

    So if you budget 1 kWh of battery storage per day to lighting, you could run 26 bulbs for 1 hour each — more than enough to provide light for trips to the bathroom, closet, and getting ready for bed.

    Remaining battery budget: 6 kWh

    TV and device charging: 2 kWh

    Device Energy use
    Wi-Fi router 0.024 kWh per day
    “>Modern TV: LED/OLED 4k or 1080P HDTV (20″ to 70″) “>0.014 to 0.18 kWh per hour
    “>TV: Plasma (40″ to 50″) “>0.4 to 0.48 kWh per hour
    “>Desktop computer “>0.06 kWh per hour
    “>Laptop computer “>0.02-0.05 kWh per hour
    “>Tablet “>0.032 kWh per day

    Let’s be honest, one of the worst parts of power outages is going without internet and TV. Sure, you try to read a book for an hour or two, but that familiar glow is calling your name.

    To keep the Wi-Fi on, you’ll need about 0.024 kWh. If you work from home, you can run your laptop for 8 hours for another 0.4 kWh. And if you want to wind-down with a movie or 3-hour Netflix binge, you’ll need another 0.54 kWh.

    That adds up to 1.18 kWh, but we’ll round up to 2 kWh to account for phone charging and multiple devices running at once.

    Remaining battery budget: 8 kWh

    Air Heating and Cooling: Variable

    Appliance Energy use
    “>Heating
    “>Electric furnace (with fan) “>10.5 kWh per hour
    “>Portable heater “>1.5 kWh per hour
    “>Baseboard heater (6-foot unit) “>1.5 kWh per hour
    Cooling
    “>Window/Wall AC (8k to 18k BTU) “>0.73 to 1.8 kWh per hour
    “>Central AC (3 ton – 12 SEER) “>3.0 kWh per hour
    “>Pedestal fan “>0.03 kWh per hour
    “>Ceiling fan “>0.025-0.075 kWh per hour

    As you can see from the table, heating and cooling take a lot of electricity. So if you only had a 10 kWh battery and no solar, you’d have maybe 2 kWh to budget for running fans or space heaters.

    But with a battery charged by solar, you would have much more electricity to spare for fans and space heaters — perhaps even enough to run central AC for a few hours, depending on your equipment.

    Medical equipment

    Device Energy use
    “>Nebulizer “>1 kWh per hour
    “>Oxygen concentrator “>0.46 kWh per hour
    “>Sleep apnea machine (CPAP) “>0.2 kWh per hour

    Another thing to consider is powering medical equipment during a power outage. Certain equipment, like a nebulizer, requires a significant amount of electricity and could eat through 10kWh of battery very quickly.

    Is getting a solar battery worth it?

    Weather-related power outages in the US increased roughly 78% from 2011 to 2021, and are becoming a reality for more homeowners. If you like clean, quiet, and hands-free backup energy that can power your home for several days during outages, then solar and battery are totally worth it. Not only can battery keep your home powered, it can keep your local grid running, as we saw in California in September 2022.

    In addition to providing backup power during outages, solar and battery can reduce your energy costs by shifting your power usage to off-peak hours when electricity is much cheaper (up to 20 cents per kWh!)

    And, of course, there are the local and global impacts of reducing fossil fuel that pollute the air and contribute to climate change.

    Click here or enter your zipcode above to see how much you can save with solar and battery.

    ,600 – 26,500 6 to 12 kW system cost installed

    Average cost of solar panels

    The average cost to install solar panels is 10,600 to 26,500 (after 30% tax credit) for a 6kW to 12kW system to power an entire house. Solar panels cost 2.53 to 3.15 per watt installed for residential systems. Solar energy costs 0.08 to 0.10 per kWh to produce on average. The average solar panel payback period is 7 to 12 years. Solar energy saves 600 to 2,000 per year on electricity costs.

    Solar Panel Installation Cost

    National Average Cost
    Minimum Cost
    Maximum Cost
    Average Range 10,600 to 26,500
    • Most solar panels last up to 50 years, have a 25-year warranty, and start generating a return on investment after 8 years.
    • Solar panels generate electricity approximately 30% cheaper than utility electricity over their lifetime.
    • Solar panel savings are 10,000 to 30,000 over 20 years depending on your location and the cost of electricity.

    Use our solar calculators below to assess your total costs, or get free estimates from solar installers near you.

    Solar panel cost calculator

    The average residential solar installation is 3 kW to 10 kW, depending on your home’s size, location, and energy needs.

    The federal solar tax credit reduces your overall costs by 30%. Many states and solar manufacturers offer additional incentives and rebates to further reduce your costs.

    Solar Panel Cost Calculator

    System Size Before Tax Credit After 30% Tax Credit
    2 kW 5,060 – 6,300 3,542 – 4,410
    3 kW 7,590 – 9,540 5,313 – 6,615
    4 kW 10,120 – 12,600 7,084 – 8,820
    5 kW 12,650 – 15,750 8,855 – 11,025
    6 kW 15,180 – 18,900 10,626 – 13,230
    7 kW 17,710 – 22,050 12,397 – 15,435
    8 kW 20,240 – 25,200 14,168 – 17,640
    10 kW 25,300 – 31,500 17,710 – 22,050
    12 kW 30,360 – 37,800 21,252 – 26,460
    15 kW 37,950 – 47,250 26,565 – 33,075
    20 kW 50,600 – 63,000 35,420 – 44,100
    25 kW 63,250 – 78,750 44,275 – 55,125

    How Many Solar Panels Do I Need?

    The average family uses 11,000 kWh per year and needs 26 to 33 solar panels to power the whole house. One solar thermal panel generates enough energy to power a hot water heater for a family of four.

    The total number of panels needed depends on your location, roof size, and energy needs. To calculate how many solar panels you need, look at your annual kWh (kilowatt-hours) usage on your utility bills and referenced the table and map below.

    Solar Panels Needed To Power A House

    System Size Panels Needed Average kWh Produced Annually
    2 kW 6 – 8 2,652
    3 kW 10 – 12 3,978
    5 kW 16 – 21 6,630
    6 kW 20 – 25 7,956
    10 kW 33 – 41 13,260
    12 kW 40 – 49 15,912
    15 kW 50 – 61 19,890
    18 kW 59 – 73 23,868

    Table based on 250 watt panels at average solar production ratios of 1.3 to 1.6.

    Your home’s location is a significant factor when estimating how many solar panels you need to power your house. Regions with less sunlight require larger systems to handle 100% of their energy needs.

    • Multiply the number in your shaded region by the estimated size of your system in kW.
    • Then, multiply the result by 0.78 to account for inefficiencies and energy conversion losses.

    For example, if you live in Texas with a score of 1700 and install an 8 kW system, your system will produce approximately 10,608 kWh annually:

    1700 × 8 kW × 0.78 = 10,608 kWh

    The table below shows the approximate system size needed in each region to produce 11,000 kWh for the average home.

    Solar System Size Needed To Produce 11,000 kWh Annually

    Region System Size (kW)
    1200 11.75 kW
    1300 10.85 kW
    1400 10.07 kW
    1500 9.40 kW
    1600 8.81 kW
    1700 8.30 kW
    1800 7.84 kW
    1900 7.42 kW
    2000 7.05 kW
    2100 6.71 kW

    Solar Panel Cost Per Watt

    Residential solar panels cost 2.53 to 3.15 per watt with installation, before any tax credits or incentives. Commercial solar costs 1.06 to 1.83 per watt. Solar systems have ratings based on the electricity produced annually in average conditions.

    Solar Energy Cost Per kWh

    Residential solar energy costs 0.08 to 0.10 per kWh on average, and commercial or utility-scale solar power costs 0.06 to 0.08 per kWh. include the federal solar tax credit and vary drastically based on the amount of sunlight and type of solar panels installed.

    Solar Panel Cost Per Watt kWh

    Unit Residential Commercial
    Per kWh 0.08 – 0.10 0.06 – 0.08
    Per Watt 2.53 – 3.15 1.06 – 1.83

    These figures represent the Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE), which is the average revenue per unit of electricity generated that would be required to recover the costs of the solar panels over their life expectancy.

    Cost of Solar Panels Per Square Foot

    The cost of solar panels to power your house are 4 to 10 per square foot with installation. However, most installers estimate solar costs by the amount of energy needed, or 2.53 to 3.15 per watt before any tax credits or incentives.

    Below are cost estimates based on home size. Overall costs depend on the solar panel type, the roof’s size and design, and your energy needs.

    Cost To Install Solar Panels On House

    Home Size (SF) Average Cost
    1,000 4,760 – 5,950
    1,500 7,140 – 8,925
    2,000 9,520 – 11,900
    2,500 11,900 – 14,875
    3,000 14,280 – 17,850

    Residential Cost of Solar Panels By State

    The average cost of solar varies significantly per state, depending on the local cost of electricity. Below are the average per watt and by system size across the United States after subtracting the 30% federal solar tax credit.

    Cost of Solar Panels By State

    State Per Watt 6 kW System 10 kW System
    Alabama 2.02 – 2.85 12,120 – 17,100 20,200 – 28,500
    Alaska 2.23 – 3.13 13,380 – 18,780 22,300 – 31,300
    Arizona 1.88 – 2.35 11,286 – 14,118 18,810 – 23,530
    Arkansas 2.42 – 2.74 14,520 – 16,440 24,200 – 27,400
    California 1.82 – 2.29 10,926 – 13,758 18,210 – 22,930
    Colorado 1.96 – 2.39 11,730 – 14,310 19,550 – 23,850
    Connecticut 1.99 – 2.49 11,994 – 14,994 19,990 – 24,990
    Washington D.C. 1.75 – 2.57 10,518 – 15,450 17,530 – 25,750
    Delaware 1.95 – 2.13 11,742 – 12,810 19,570 – 21,350
    Florida 1.48 – 2.09 8,880 – 12,552 14,800 – 20,920
    Georgia 1.91 – 2.14 11,448 – 12,852 19,080 – 21,420
    Idaho 2.03 – 2.22 12,162 – 13,314 20,270 – 22,190
    Illinois 2.01 – 2.52 12,078 – 15,162 20,130 – 25,270
    Indiana 2.07 – 2.49 12,444 – 14,940 20,740 – 24,900
    Iowa 2.20 – 2.38 13,200 – 14,268 22,000 – 23,780
    Kansas 1.49 – 2.06 8,940 – 12,360 14,900 – 20,600
    Kentucky 2.35 – 3.04 14,100 – 18,240 23,500 – 30,400
    Louisiana 1.77 – 2.33 10,644 – 13,980 17,740 – 23,300
    Maine 1.85 – 2.35 11,100 – 14,100 18,500 – 23,500
    Maryland 1.67 – 2.16 10,026 – 12,942 16,710 – 21,570
    Massachusetts 1.94 – 2.37 11,628 – 14,376 19,380 – 23,960
    Michigan 1.99 – 2.50 11,976 – 14,976 19,960 – 24,960
    Minnesota 2.01 – 2.37 12,000 – 14,244 20,000 – 23,740
    Mississippi 1.98 – 2.75 11,880 – 16,500 19,800 – 27,500
    Missouri 1.71 – 2.42 10,260 – 14,520 17,100 – 24,200
    Montana 1.86 – 2.34 11,148 – 14,064 18,580 – 23,440
    Nebraska 1.74 – 2.88 10,440 – 17,280 17,400 – 28,800
    Nevada 1.92 – 2.13 11,526 – 12,762 19,210 – 21,270
    New Hampshire 1.97 – 2.55 11,796 – 15,300 19,660 – 25,500
    New Jersey 1.76 – 2.35 10,530 – 14,118 17,550 – 23,530
    New Mexico 2.02 – 2.73 12,102 – 16,362 20,170 – 27,270
    New York 1.80 – 2.64 10,824 – 15,840 18,040 – 26,400
    North Carolina 1.73 – 2.27 10,380 – 13,632 17,300 – 22,720
    North Dakota 1.39 – 1.97 8,340 – 11,820 13,900 – 19,700
    Ohio 1.79 – 2.29 10,740 – 13,740 17,900 – 22,900
    Oklahoma 1.88 – 3.34 11,280 – 20,040 18,800 – 33,400
    Oregon 1.63 – 2.20 9,804 – 13,224 16,340 – 22,040
    Pennsylvania 1.80 – 2.60 10,782 – 15,630 17,970 – 26,050
    Rhode Island 2.08 – 2.44 12,492 – 14,652 20,820 – 24,420
    South Carolina 1.92 – 2.38 11,544 – 14,292 19,240 – 23,820
    South Dakota 1.88 – 2.93 11,280 – 17,580 18,800 – 29,300
    Tennessee 1.30 – 1.97 7,800 – 11,820 13,000 – 19,700
    Texas 1.75 – 2.15 10,494 – 12,906 17,490 – 21,510
    Utah 1.83 – 2.41 10,950 – 14,454 18,250 – 24,090
    Vermont 1.79 – 2.58 10,716 – 15,480 17,860 – 25,800
    Virginia 1.69 – 2.11 10,134 – 12,630 16,890 – 21,050
    Washington 1.71 – 2.19 10,278 – 13,110 17,130 – 21,850
    West Virginia 2.17 – 3.38 13,020 – 20,280 21,700 – 33,800
    Wisconson 2.11 – 2.42 12,666 – 14,490 21,110 – 24,150
    Wyoming 2.39 – 2.78 14,340 – 16,680 23,900 – 27,800

    Cost after subtracting the 30% federal tax credit.

    Average Solar Panel Installation Costs By Brand

    Below are total installation costs for 6kW and 10kW residential solar systems by brand after subtracting the 30% tax credit. Most solar manufacturers offer similar pricing. However, the price is typically reflective of panel quality.

    Solar Panel Installation Cost By Brand

    Manufacturer Per Watt 6 kW System 10 kW System
    Axitec 1.57 – 2.10 9,450 – 12,642 15,750 – 21,070
    Astronergy 1.85 – 2.35 11,130 – 14,154 18,550 – 23,590
    Canadian Solar Inc. 1.65 – 2.26 9,954 – 13,566 16,590 – 22,610
    CertainTeed Solar 2.06 – 2.48 12,390 – 14,910 20,650 – 24,850
    Hanwha Q CELLS 1.73 – 2.31 10,416 – 13,860 17,360 – 23,100
    Heliene 1.71 – 2.28 10,290 – 13,692 17,150 – 22,820
    Hyundai 1.87 – 2.14 11,256 – 12,894 18,760 – 21,490
    JA Solar 1.72 – 2.29 10,374 – 13,776 17,290 – 22,960
    JinkoSolar 1.98 – 2.58 11,928 – 15,498 19,880 – 25,830
    LG Solar 1.89 – 2.47 11,340 – 14,868 18,900 – 24,780
    LONGi Solar 1.69 – 2.07 10,164 – 12,474 16,940 – 20,790
    Mission Solar Energy 1.52 – 2.06 9,156 – 12,390 15,260 – 20,650
    Panasonic 1.89 – 2.45 11,340 – 14,700 18,900 – 24,500
    Peimar Group 1.86 – 2.24 11,172 – 13,440 18,620 – 22,400
    Phono Solar 2.10 – 2.49 12,642 – 14,952 21,070 – 24,920
    REC Group 1.92 – 2.32 11,550 – 13,944 19,250 – 23,240
    RGS Energy 2.31 – 3.47 13,860 – 20,874 23,100 – 34,790
    Renogy Solar 2.10 – 2.39 12,642 – 14,364 21,070 – 23,940
    S-Energy 1.77 – 2.35 10,668 – 14,112 17,780 – 23,520
    Seraphim Solar 1.85 – 2.24 11,130 – 13,482 18,550 – 22,470
    Silfab Solar 1.70 – 2.45 10,206 – 14,700 17,010 – 24,500
    SolarTech Universal 1.72 – 2.21 10,374 – 13,272 17,290 – 22,120
    SolarWorld 1.73 – 2.15 10,416 – 12,936 17,360 – 21,560
    Solaria 2.06 – 2.35 12,390 – 14,154 20,650 – 23,590
    SunPower Corporation 2.01 – 2.77 12,096 – 16,674 20,160 – 27,790
    Trina Solar 1.72 – 2.22 10,374 – 13,356 17,290 – 22,260
    Tesla 2.33 – 3.10 13,986 – 18,606 23,310 – 31,010
    Winaico 1.92 – 2.21 11,550 – 13,314 19,250 – 22,190
    Yingli Solar 1.70 – 2.21 10,206 – 13,272 17,010 – 22,120

    include 30% tax credit and reflect installation costs from solar contractors. Total costs depend on the location, installers experience, inverter, and other equipment.

    How Much Does One Solar Panel Cost?

    One 150 to 300-watt solar panel costs 112 to 450 on average or between 0.75 to 1.50 per watt, depending on the panel type, size, and energy-efficiency rating. Solar companies that purchase in bulk typically spend 0.75 per watt, while homeowners spend 1 per watt.

    Most distributors only sell solar panels to local contractors at bulk wholesale prices. Hiring a solar installer will drastically reduce your equipment costs.

    The following table shows for the panels only. Additional installation costs include inverters, batteries, mounting hardware, wiring, and more.

    Solar Panels For Home Cost Per Panel

    System Size Average Cost
    14 Panel System (4.2 kW) 2,600 – 4,200
    16 Panel System (4.8 kW) 3,000 – 4,800
    18 Panel System (5.4 kW) 3,350 – 5,400
    20 Panel System (6.0 kW) 3,750 – 6,000
    24 Panel System (7.2 kW) 4,450 – 7,200
    28 Panel System (8.4 kW) 5,236 – 8,400
    32 Panel System (9.6 kW) 5,984 – 9,600
    36 Panel System (10.8 kW) 6,732 – 10,800

    Solar Panel Lease Cost

    A solar panel lease costs 50 and 250 per month, depending on your location and energy needs. Leasing solar panels is cost-effective and typically saves 50 to 100 per month on your electricity bills with little to no down payment.

    Solar leasing companies are responsible for the installation and maintenance fees for the duration of your contract. If you move, expect to pay additional fees to end your leasing agreement because transferring the lease to another buyer can be difficult.

    If you own a solar system outright that generates 100% of your power, the monthly cost is less than 10 per month for minor grid-tied connection fees. An off-grid system has no monthly costs other than general maintenance.

    Tesla Solar Roof Cost

    A Tesla solar roof costs 22 to 45 per square foot, which includes the solar roof tiles, a Powerwall, roof and site repairs, and complete system installation. A 9.45 kW solar system installed on a 1,800 square foot roof costs between 39,600 and 81,000.

    On average, solar shingles cost up to 8,000 more than installing a new roof with traditional PV solar panels. Glass-faced solar shingles mimic the appearance of a tiled roof and cover more surface area than mounted PV panels to catch more sunlight.

    Solar tiles have a lower efficiency rating than solar panels. They may not last as long as PV panels because their design doesn’t allow much room for ventilation, which can lead to overheating.

    Commercial Solar Panel Cost

    A 10 kW to 2 MW commercial solar panel system costs 1.83 per watt before any tax rebates or incentives. Larger fixed-tilt or one-axis tracking utility-scale systems greater than 2 MW cost 1.06 per watt on average.

    18kw, solar, system

    Commercial solar installation costs for small and mid-sized businesses range from 43,000 for a 25 kW system to 175,000 for a 100 kW system. Businesses recover about 45 percent of solar panel costs within the first year through tax credits and rebate programs.

    Commercial Solar Panel Cost

    System Size Average Cost Before Tax Credits
    25 kW 43,500 to 56,000
    50 kW 87,500 to 113,000
    100 kW 175,000 to 225,500
    250 kW 437,000 to 563,500

    Solar Savings Estimator

    The solar payback information below covers the average break-even period, which is when your power supply becomes free, and the projected savings over 20 years.

    Solar Panel Return On Investment (ROI)

    The average solar panel payback period is 7 to 12 years, depending on where you live and the cost of electricity. Upfront costs are 11,000 on average, with savings of 1,400 per year on foregone energy bills. You’ll break even after 8 years and start generating a return on your investment.

    How Much Do Solar Panels Save?

    Over 20 years, solar panel savings range from 10,000 to 30,000, depending on your location and the cost of electricity.

    Solar energy saves 600 to 2,000 per year by reducing your electricity bills and selling your solar renewable energy credits (SRECs).

    Solar Panel Savings Calculator

    Location Savings Over 20 Years Payback Period (Years)
    Albuquerque, NM 17,576 – 25,109 15.06
    Austin, TX 14,627 – 20,896 7.04
    Baltimore, MD 16,349 – 23,356 6.90
    Boston, MA 17,449 – 24,928 9.66
    Charlotte, NC 15,035 – 21,479 8.20
    Chicago, IL 14,591 – 20,844 11.85
    Denver, CO 15,035 – 21,479 13.30
    Honolulu, HI 34,104 – 48,720 6.55
    Houston, TX 14,627 – 20,896 7.57
    Indianapolis, IN 11,637 – 16,625 14.60
    Jersey City, NJ 18,349 – 26,214 9.95
    Las Vegas, NV 13,918 – 19,883 9.05
    Los Angeles, CA 25,414 – 36,306 11.99
    New York, NY 17,247 – 24,639 10.58
    Philadelphia, PA 13,689 – 19,556 9.35
    Phoenix, AZ 18,325 – 26,179 7.50
    Portland, OR 11,351 – 16,216 11.66
    San Francisco, CA 14,700 – 21,000 11.34
    Seattle, WA 6,863 – 12,805 11.26
    Washington, DC 21,840 – 31,200 6.78

    6kW system powering 70% to 100% of your energy needs.

    Here’s a more granular look at solar savings on power bills per year by location.

    Solar Panel Savings On Electricity Bills

    Location Average Savings Per Year
    Albuquerque, NM 1,349
    Austin, TX 782
    Boston, MA 2,196
    Charlotte, NC 805
    Chicago, IL 1,059
    Jersey City, NJ 1,762
    Los Angeles, CA 2,477
    New York, NY 1,404
    Philadelphia, PA 1,006
    Portland, OR 864
    San Francisco, CA 1,822
    Seattle, WA 633
    Washington, DC 1,127

    Are Solar Panels Worth It?

    Solar panels generate electricity approximately 30% cheaper than utility electricity in most locations, making them worth it over their lifetime. The 30% federal solar tax credit and state incentives make solar energy more affordable.

    The average residential electricity rate from utility companies is 16.4 cents per kWh, depending on the location. An 8 kW solar system costs 15,000 and generates 11,000 kWh annually or 880 to 1,100 worth of energy. Over the lifetime of the solar panels, this equates to 8 to 10 cents per kWh, which makes solar panels worth it after the hefty upfront cost.

    Solar Panel Installation Cost Factors

    The cost to convert a house to solar power depends on your location, energy needs, type of solar panels, inverter and equipment options, permits, inspection, tax credits, and labor costs.

    Use the national averages in the following table to calculate a cost-benefit analysis for solar PV installation.

    Cost To Convert House To Solar Power

    Item Percent Average Cost
    Solar Panels, Inverter Parts 30% 3,188 – 3,969
    Balance of System 20% 2,125 – 2,646
    Labor 15% 1,594 – 1,985
    Permits and Inspection 15% 1,594 – 1,985
    Operational 20% 2,125 – 2,646

    Cost of Solar Panels Over Time

    The average cost of solar panels fell 65% from 7.34 per watt in 2010, to 2.53 per watt in 2019 and continues to drop. A standard 6 kW residential solar system has dropped from 44,000 down to 15,200 over the past decade (not including the federal solar tax credit).

    Cost of Solar Panels Over Time

    Year Cost Per Watt
    2010 7.34
    2011 6.44
    2012 4.55
    2013 3.97
    2014 3.49
    2015 3.23
    2016 3.02
    2017 2.84
    2018 2.70
    2019 2.53
    2020 2.34
    2021 2.22

    Estimates are based on the average rate of decline.

    Labor Costs To Install Solar Panels

    The average labor cost to install solar panels is 0.27 per watt, or around 15% of the total system cost. A standard 6 kW system with 20 to 25 panels costs about 1,600 for installation labor before applying the 30% federal solar tax credit.

    Labor costs increase if your home has multiple stories, skylights, dormers, or a problematic 45° roof pitch. Contractors may need to design a unique system to make sure the panels receive enough sunlight to be efficient.

    Off-Grid Solar Kit 18000W 48VDC 120V/240V LifePo4 20.48KWH Lithium Battery 18 X 415 Watts Solar Panels SGR-18K20E

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    This Complete Off-Grid Solar Kit comes with what you need to run your home or cabin completely off-grid, or commercial solar system ,it inlcudes the 18 X 415W solar panel, 20.48KWH battery, 18000W solar inverter and Three set of solar cable and bracket. it will produce around 30KWH per day based on 4 hours sun. With 18kw split phase (120/240V) output, it is more than powerful enough to run everything from air conditioners and well pumps to lights, fridge, TV, workshop, office and even light commercial and industrial applications. It is a much more afforable price and easily expandable, you can always add more batteries and more solar panels in the future.

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