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110W Monocrystalline Solar Panel Professional DC-110. 110v solar power supply

110W Monocrystalline Solar Panel Professional DC-110. 110v solar power supply

    The Best Solar Generators of 2023, Tested and Reviewed

    Whether you are outfitting your home in case of an extended power outage or looking for a steady supply of off-grid power for your overlanding setup, it’s never been a better time to purchase a solar generator. But sifting through all the available options on the market—power stations that are lunchbox-sized to luggage-sized, solar panels that can pack in a backpack to multiple eight-foot long panels you chain together—can take a lot of time and effort. To help you choose the best solar generator for your purpose, we tested some of the most powerful models from Anker, Jackery, Goal Zero, and BioLite side by side to see how they stacked up.

    • Best Overall:Jackery Solar Generator 1000 Pro
    • Best Value:Anker 555 Solar Generator
    • Most Portable:BioLite BaseCharge 1500 Solar Panel 100
    • Most Customizable:Goal Zero Yeti 1500X Boulder 200 Briefcase Solar Generator
    • Best for RVs:Anker Solar Generator 767

    How I Tested the Best Solar Generators

    There are two components to a solar generator—a solar panel and a power station. To understand the performance of the overall package, I looked at each component and then also assessed how they worked in tandem.

    • Solar Panels were tested in tandem (to ensure similar conditions) under clear skies. Testing was conducted in late fall, when the angle of the sun is less ideal than it would be at the peak of summer, affecting the potential of each panel to reach its claimed maximum output. Solar panels were tested using power stations of the same brand, but where possible, I also used different panels with different power stations to see if that affected the results.
    • Power stations were evaluated on a number of criteria. After fully charging all the power stations, I left them in a climate-controlled room for three days and then outside for twenty-four hours in near-freezing temperatures—none of the power stations registered any loss of power during this test. Next, I plugged various appliances into all of the power stations to see how they handled the volume: a dehumidifier, a sunlamp, two laptops, one of the best power banks for camping, a pair of headphones, another power station, etc. Using these setups, I ran each power station down to half its estimated output. Finally, I considered how compatible each power station was with other solar panels, as well as additional features, such as Bluetooth-compatible apps, display panels, wireless charging, USB-C input ports, and more.

    Solar Panels Tested

    I tested six solar panels rated for both 100W and 200W capacity from Goal Zero, Anker, Jackery, and BioLite.

    I checked that all the solar panels were pointed in the same direction and at the same angle when testing their measured output against their claimed output.

    Model Weight Size (unfolded) Output Ports Warranty Claimed output Measured output
    Jackery SolarSaga 200W Solar Panel 18 lbs 540 x 2320 x 25 mm DC 1.5 years 200W 184W
    Goal Zero Boulder 200W 42 lbs 40 x 53.5 x 1.75 inches High Power Port (HPP) 2 years 200W 145W
    Anker 531 Solar Panel 20 lbs 23.75 x 83.75 x.75 inches XT-60 2 years 200W 158W
    Goal Zero Boulder 100W 20 lbs 40 x 26.75 x 1.75 inches High Power Port (HPP) 2 years 100W 73W
    Anker 625 Solar Panel 11 lbs 57 x 20.75 x 1.75 inches XT-60 2 years 100W 94W
    BioLite Solar Panel 100 10 lbs 20 x 57.5 x 1 inches High Power Port (HPP) 1 year 100W 52W

    Power Stations Tested

    The power stations I tested ranged in size from 1,002Wh to 2,048Wh, and were capable of either 110 volts or 120 volts (the latter is what you’ll need to run most major appliances).

    All of the power stations were capable of holding a charge for extended periods of time, losing no power in either the three-day indoors test or the 24-hour outdoors test in subfreezing and near freezing temperatures.

    Model Weight Wh Input ports Input Max for Solar Max voltage for the AC outlet App? Warranty
    Goal Zero Yeti 1500X 45.5 lbs 1,516 USB-C, 8mm, high power port (HPP) 600W 120V Yes 2 years
    Jackery Explorer 1000 Pro 25.5 lbs 1,002 AC and DC 800W 120V No 3 years
    Anker 767 XX 2,048 AC and XT60 1000W 120V Yes 5 years
    Anker 555 29.8 lbs 1,024 DC and USB-C 200W 110V No 5 years
    BioLite BaseCharge 1500 26.5 1,521 USB-C, high power port (HPP) 400W 110V No 2 years

    Best Overall: Jackery Solar Generator 1000 Pro (Explorer 1000 Pro Solar Saga 200W)

    Key Features

    • Power station capacity: 1002 watt hours
    • Solar panels: four 200-watt solar panels
    • Energy created by one panel in direct sunlight: 184 watts
    • Max AC output: 120 volts and 1000 watts
    • Also available with a 2000Wh power station
    • Also available with two 80-watt panels

    Along with the BioLite BaseCharge 1500 and Anker 555, the Jackery Explorer 1000 Pro had one of the more streamlined user interfaces. There are separate buttons to activate the USB outlets, AC outlets, and DC outlet, along with a button to turn on the power station’s light (in case you want to light up your camp or home) and one to turn on the display. The display here gives you the bare minimum of information—watts in, watts out, percent of the battery remaining, and the time to charge or deplete the battery based on the current conditions.

    The Explorer 1000 Pro has a max output of 1000W (peaking at 2000W), which is enough juice to power many modern refrigerators. But given that its battery life is only 1002Wh, it can only supply that power for about a day (assuming it’s not charging anything else) unless it’s also being supplied with fresh juice from a solar panel setup at the same time. For some, this won’t be an issue, as they’ll simply be using the battery to channel power to their other devices during the day while it’s charging, and then using the battery at night to power more low-key items like the best camping fans or maybe one high-energy device like a portable fridge.

    At over 25 pounds, the Jackery Explorer 1000 Pro, is one of the more transportable units I looked at, but it’s still not something that you’d want to lug more than a hundred feet or so at a time.

    The Solar Panel

    I originally tested the SolarSaga 200W solar panel as a full setup, with four panels plugged into a single power station. This test showed the full power of the array, which registered 650W of power generation on a sunny (albeit hazy) day. I retested a single panel in tandem with the rest of the units in this review more recently, and under completely clear skies, the panel was even more impressive: It registered 184W of energy coming from a single panel. If you don’t have much time to recharge your power station from the sun, then the full setup with all four panels is a no-brainer.

    It is, though, a little complicated. Each panel comes with a carrying case and a cable that connects back to the two DC ports on the Explorer 1000 Pro. If you see a math problem here, that’s correct: You’ll also need two of the Jackery Solar Panel Connectors, which, strangely, are not included in the purchase price. Two of these can be used to double the number of panels you can connect to the Explorer 1000 Pro.

    Setting up and taking down this many panels takes some time, but I was impressed by how easy and intuitive it was. That’s because Jackery streamlined the number of ports on each unit, making it that much clearer what cable connects to what unit in what port.

    While there might at first glance appear to be a disconnect between the charging time capabilities of this setup and its battery life, it’s worth keeping in mind that conditions are not always optimal. One of the things that impressed me most about these units is the panel’s ability to generate electricity in lowlight conditions. Even in complete shade—dusk fast approaching—a single SolarSaga was generating a 6W input.

    Best Budget: Anker 555 Solar Generator (555 PowerHouse with Two (2) 625 Solar Panels 100W)

    Key Features

    • Power Station Capacity: 1024 watt hours
    • Solar Panels: two 100-watt solar panels
    • Energy Created By One Panel In Direct Sunlight: 94 watts
    • Max AC output: 110 volts and 1000 watts
    • Also available with a 1229Wh power station and three 100W solar panels
    • Max power station output is 110V
    • XT60 port on the solar panel needs an adapter to be compatible with the power station

    If your family has a bevy of devices that seemingly all need to be plugged in simultaneously, you are in luck with the Anker 555 PowerHouse. It was the only unit in my test that boasted six AC outlets, as well as three USB-C outlets and two USB-A outlets. There were so many outlets that it was actually hard to find enough things to plug into it in my home—I ended up with an air purifier, sun lamp, two fans, a laptop, and a battery pack plugged in. The 555 PowerHouse had no problem with this—it barely used a third of its total output power. If your family has a bunch of devices that simply must be charged at all times, then this is a great option.

    Note that this would not be the best choice for someone looking for backup power for their refrigerator, as its 1,024 watt hour capacity was on the smaller side in my test and only has up to 110-volt output.

    Something else I liked about this unit was the utility—and comparative simplicity—of its charging abilities. It has one DC input port in the back and a USB-C 100W port that plays double duty with input and output. As someone who struggles to keep track of the sheer number and variety of cords that are always floating around, I appreciated the ability to recharge this unit without tracking down the original cord.

    The Solar Panel

    The Anker 625 was easily the best of the 100W panels I tested—it was one of the best solar panels for camping I tested back in the spring, and it’s still one of my favorite pieces of gear. It even beat out the 200W Jackery SolarSaga if you consider that this panel generated 94 percent of its claimed output, while the Jackery only managed 92 percent. Part of this is the inclusion of a sundial in the top center of the panel, which helped me align the panel correctly during setup. This sundial is such a useful feature, that after I had correctly aligned the Anker 625, I went back and adjusted all the other panels to match it—an instant uptick in power was measured. Two of these panels is a great choice for recharging a power station the size of the 555 PowerHouse.

    I’ve been testing this panel for a while—unlike some of the others in this test—and in that time I’ve noticed that it’s picked up a bit of scuffing along the edges of the fabric backing. While not ideal, this has not impacted the functionality of the unit in the slightest.

    Most Portable: BioLite BaseCharge 1500 Solar Panel 100

    Key Features

    • Power station Capacity: 1521 watt hours
    • Solar Panels: one 100-watt solar panel
    • Energy Created By One Panel In Direct Sunlight: 52 watts
    • Max AC output: 110 volts and 1200 watts
    • Also available with a 622Wh power station
    • Lightest unit I tested
    • Power station is easy to use
    • Power station is compatible with the Goal Zero Boulder 200 (up to two)

    Like the Jackery Explorer 1000 Pro and the Anker 555 PowerHouse, the BioLite BaseCharge 1500 has a sleek and streamlined user interface that is easy to read and understand. The display panel shows the percentage of your battery left, the estimated number of hours it will take to either run through or finish charging the battery, the watts coming into your unit, and the watts going out. It also shows you the number of watt-hours the unit has used in total—watching that number was a bit like watching the odometer tick up on your car. Not super useful daily, but a nice thing to know in the aggregate. There are separate buttons to turn on the ports for USB, DC, and AC power, as well as a button to turn on the display. (A second button allows you to reset the display of how many watts you’ve used, useful if you are interested in getting an accurate read on your total power needs).

    There were three details that made the BioLite BaseCharge 1500 stand out next to the competition:

    • A wireless charging option on top of the unit. (Unfortunately, I was not able to test this as I do not have a device with this capability.)
    • The choice to put the input port on the front of the unit, as opposed to the back. During testing, I found that this configuration was easier when plugging in solar panels.
    • This power station is surprisingly lightweight, especially compared to the Yeti 1500X, which has a comparable watt-hour capacity. If you plan to move your power station from room to room, this is a no-brainer.

    During testing, the BioLite BaseCharge 1500 was one of the few power stations where the “hours to empty” estimate kept jumping around. It probably accurately reflected the change in power needs of the bigger devices, but was confusing to look at and made the time estimates less useful than they would have otherwise been. (The percentage estimate of the amount of battery life remaining, however, stayed fairly consistent.)

    The Solar Panel

    While the BaseCharge 1500 ended up being one of my favorite power stations, the BioLite Solar Panel 100 was my least favorite solar panel. First off, two kickstands simply don’t provide enough support for the panels. This is partly because two just isn’t enough, but also because one of the kickstands is situated closer to the middle of the unit, rather than both being on the outer edges. I was able to use the BaseCharge 1500 to help prop it up a bit, but it wasn’t an ideal solution.

    One thing that I did like about this unit is that, like the Anker 625, it incorporated a sundial, which helped me to situate the panel at the right angle to maximize the energy output.

    However, even with that advantage, this was by far the weakest panel in my test, only generating about half of its claimed output even on a clear day with sunny skies. If you choose to go with a BaseCharge 1500, it’s worth considering pairing it with a Goal Zero Boulder 200W, a pairing that proved successful during testing.

    Best Customization: Goal Zero Yeti 1500X Boulder 200 Briefcase Solar Generator

    Key Features

    • Power Station Capacity: 1516 watt hours
    • Solar Panels: one 100-watt solar panel
    • Energy created by one panel in direct sunlight: 73 watts
    • Max AC output: 120 volts and 2000 watts
    • Solar panels also available at 200-watt and 300-watt capacity
    • power station s available in sizes ranging from 187 watt hours to 6071 watt hours
    • Possible to monitor the power station from another room using the app
    • The larger power station s could power major appliances for days without recharging
    • Heavy
    • Less intuitive than other power station s I looked at
    • Difficult to recharge if you lose the original cables

    The Yeti 1500X was one of the most complicated user interfaces to navigate, and included several details that I have mixed feelings about. The most glaring one is that when the unit is plugged into a power source, a light blinks blue continuously until it is charged, when it switches to solid blue—if you are in the same space as this unit when it is charging, this is very distracting. Next is the three buttons above the display—which read “unit,” “light,” and “info.” Unit is fairly straightforward—it toggles the input and output measurements between volts, amperes, watts, etc. This is pretty handy if you’re curious about how much power a given device is chewing through. Next is light—on other power stations, this button turns on an actual light, which is useful if you’re trying to see what you’re doing in the evening hours. The Goal Zero, however, does not have a built-in light; what this button turns on and off is the display screen showing the power supply. The info button only seemed to turn on the display (not off)—it was unclear what other use this was meant to have.

    Interestingly, despite having one of the most powerful AC ports in my test, there was only space for two plug-ins. Most of the time, I suspect this will be plenty for people (and it does help to cut down on the unnecessary juice being lost out of these ports), but others might find themselves digging out a powerstrip to make up for the lack fo ports.

    One of the more unusual features of the Yeti 1500X is a top lid, which has storage for charging cables, or anything else you want to throw in there. Underneath, it also has detailed descriptions of all of the power limitations of the various ports, plus evergreen reminders about not letting your power station get wet—all in semi-legible font. Surprisingly that can’t be said for any of the power stations in my test (including the Anker 767, which despite having the largest surface area strangely didn’t include this information at all). There is also a second 8mm port under the lid as well as a 12V HPP output port.

    The amount of power it was being charged with supplying—1385 watts through a single AC port (I had plugged it back into the Anker 767 unit) was higher than anything else I tested, due to this being the only combination where that was available—the maximum input capability of the Yeti 1500X is 150V from AC power). The icon showing how much power was remaining did, however, stay consistent.

    Like the Anker 767, the Yeti 1500X has an app that you can use to monitor the battery’s power usage. This app was not as intuitive to use as the Anker 767’s, requiring several more steps to get to the point where I could monitor the battery usage (it also asked me to upgrade its firmware seemingly every other time I opened it). However, once you have the whole thing set up, it provides just as much information and control as the Anker 767 app.

    110w, monocrystalline, solar, panel, professional, dc-110

    The Solar Panel

    I tested both the Boulder 100W and the Boulder 200W from Goal Zero. These are basically the same panels (although with different ports (HPP versus DC), affecting what other power stations you might be able to pair them with), just at a different size, so whether you choose one over the other will depend on your energy needs, and your personal strength.

    These panels are significantly bulkier and more cumbersome than anything else I tested. While the likes of Jackery’s SolarSaga series and the Anker solar panels are a bit like someone took a backpacking solar panel and just blew it up to 20x the size. The Boulder series from Goal Zero looks like a solar panel off your house that’s shrunken down to something you could throw into the back of your car.

    Both the 100W and the 200W solar panels come with carrying cases, which due to the placement of the zippers are kind of a nuisance to use. But use them you should because the way these panels fold up leaves the solar cells on the outside of the package, rather than on the inside (like the rest of the solar panels in my test). While the 100W panel was heavy, but otherwise easy enough to move thanks to the inclusion of a comfortable handle on the long side of the folded-up panels, the 200W had a tendency to drag across the ground (at least this was my experience, as a 5 foot 5 inch individual), forcing me to lean to one side as I walked. Did I mention that these panels were heavy? At 42 pounds, the Boulder 200W is extremely heavy.

    While the Boulder solar panels were reasonably easy to set up, the way the legs are designed give you fewer options for maximizing the angle of the sun in the winter months, when it’s lower to the horizon. This showed during testing, when the panels only pulled in 73W for the 100W panel, and 143W for the 200W panel.

    0W Monocrystalline Solar Panel Professional DC-110

    The most efficient 110W solar panel on the market, the DC-110 is a high quality, professional grade monocrystalline solar panel is for both industrial and residential off-grid including the marine community, anywhere where a reliable supply of electricity is required away from the mains grid.

    The DC-110 solar panel features SunPower’s advanced monocrystalline cells (made in USA) and world renowned quality and robust assembly. Being a monocrystalline panel, the professional DC-110 will continue producing energy in even low light conditions and high ambient temperatures. All solar panels become less efficient when the ‘in sun’ temperature reaches 50 degC, but these ultra-efficient solar cells from the US mean that the DC-100 can maintain its efficiency far better than many cheaper models.

    This solar panel is ‘Power guaranteed’ for 10 years, with a 2 year product warranty.

    Professional Grade Features and Benefits

    • A sturdy anodised aluminum frame with mounting holes to match the industry norm enables easy installation on currently available mounting structures.
    • Over 6.1A of peak battery charging current.
    • 30-50% smaller than other solar panels
    • Unique back-contact solar cells with conversion efficiency up to 20.1%
    • Low voltage-temperature coefficient ensures maximum battery charging current is available even during high-temperature operation.
    • Exceptional low-light performance and high sensitivity to light across the entire solar spectrum maximises yearly charging performance in any weather.
    • Highest quality 4mm-thick high-transmission tempered glass provides enhanced stiffness and impact resistance.
    • Aerospace style cell interconnects with in-plane strain relief provide extremely high reliability.
    • Advanced EVA encapsulation system with multi-layer backsheet provides excellent long-term package durability.
    • Waterproof junction box (IP65 rated)

    Technical Specification

    • Model:DC-110
    • Peak Power:110W
    • Rated Voltage:17.9V
    • Rated Current:6.1A
    • Open Circuit Voltage:21.6V
    • Short Circuit Current:6.8A
    • Series Fuse Rating:15A
    • Maximum System Voltage:70V
    • Temperature Co-efficient. Power:-0.38%/C
    • Temperature Co-efficient. Voltage:-1.8mV/ C
    • Temperature Co-efficient. Current:2.3mA/C
    • Module Efficiency:21.5%
    • Weight:7.4 kg
    • Unit Dimensions:(mm) 1038 x 527 x 35

    All technical specifications and images are correct at the time of publication, but are subject to change without notice.

    Why you should never invest in “plug-in” solar panels

    There’s a lot of pride when it comes to choosing to go solar. You’re making an investment in a cleaner energy future, becoming more self reliant, and when you pair those panels together with a home battery storage solution, you can still generate electricity even if the power goes out.

    Though, this home solar investment is not cheap. Professional solar power system installations typically cost about 3,000 per kilowatt. Most average-sized solar PV systems are 6 kilowatts, meaning you’re looking at a price tag nearing 20,000.

    So, of course there are some solar kit companies out there who are looking to sell you an easy way to go solar, without an installer. “Just plug in the panels into a regular electrical outlet, and boom! You’ve gone solar.” If that sounds too good to be true, it is.

    In this article, we explain why you should never invest in “plug-in” solar panels. We’ll describe how they work, discuss the companies who offer them, reveal why they aren’t worth it, and provide you with some alternatives to consider.

    How plug-in solar panels work

    The main draws to plug-in solar panels are that they are simple to understand, and they’re cheap.

    Plug-in solar panels (also called “plug and play solar panels”) are typically offered in pairs and can be wired together into arrays that range from those two base panels (about 640 watts) all the way up to as many sets as you want.

    Since about 2012, companies like PluggedSolar and SunPlug have been offering these inexpensive plug-in solar panel kits as a way to lure budget-minded do-it-yourself homeowners into the world of solar energy. Similar kits can also be found on Amazon at a price range of 500-1200.

    Affixed to the back of each solar panel in a plug-in solar array, is a microinverter. Inverters are responsible for converting the DC electricity which the panels generate into AC electricity which your home appliances use.

    Microinverters comply with auto-safety shutoff standards, so if they detect a power drop from the grid or your home, they will not allow electricity to flow back into your home circuits or back to the grid.

    This is to ensure line-workers who may be troubleshooting problems don’t get zapped while they’re fixing things back up. They also help protect kids who may be messing with the cord end if the panels aren’t attached to the wall.

    Coming out of the solar array is a plug, just like the kind coming out of your vacuum cleaner. Plug-in solar kits also come with ground mounts for the panels to sit on an angle to face the sun. Plop the array in the sun, plug it in to your wall outlet, and you’ve now gone solar. Easy peasy, right? Nope.

    Why plug-in solar panels aren’t worth it

    The marketing materials for plug-in solar panels are chock-full of easy-to-understand language that sounds like, “Hey, these are revolutionary! Instead of something consuming energy when you plug this gizmo into your wall outlet, it generates electricity for you to use in your house! Act now, we’ll throw in a second solar panel for half the price!”

    For the most part, the statement is true. If you plug in an array of solar panels into your wall outlet, the electricity the panels generate will definitely flow into your home. However, there are big risks in doing this.

    For one, you are supposed to use a dedicated circuit for the plug-in solar array. That’s because if there’s too much energy flowing into and out of any one circuit, you can be asking for a fire. By dedicating only a single circuit to have your solar energy feed into your electrical panel with, you’re reducing your risk.

    Safety concerns

    Considering how these panels are marketed, it’s basically like giving a 16-year old keys to a sports car. there’s bound to be mishaps.

    110w, monocrystalline, solar, panel, professional, dc-110

    How many people are going to get jazzed up when their plug-in solar panels arrive, set them up on the back patio and plop them into the same outlet and circuit which powers their hot tub? Probably a non-insignificant amount. You’re asking for trouble. Not only that, but the cord which connects the panels to your wall may also be a trip hazard.

    Costs

    Plug-in solar panels are significantly less expensive than professionally-completed installations, especially upfront. You can have about 600 watts of plugged-in solar for about 1,000. That equates to about 1.67 per watt. Professional installations range from 2.50 to 3.00 per watt in the United States.

    Think carefully about what you’re paying for, though. With plugged-in DIY solar panels, yes you could easily take your sets of panels with you if you decide to move, but… they look clunky, take up space in your lawn or patio, you can bump into them, they need a dedicated circuit, and you or your guests can trip over the cord.

    Since plug-in solar panels are not installed by a licensed electrician or signed off on by your utility company, they may actually be illegal in some areas. Plug-in solar panels violate many local utility codes because they feed electricity into a home circuit without dedicated shutoff and safety features.

    In other areas, you will not be able to reap the benefits of hefty solar power incentives like state renewable energy certificates (SRECs) or local rebates. While they may qualify for the federal 30% investment tax credit, you’ll probably be better off applying that credit to a larger, professionally-installed solar installation.

    over, a couple of plug-in solar panels aren’t really going to save you a significant amount of money on your electricity bills. To make a big difference on your electric bill, you’ll usually need at least a 5 kilowatt system, or about 15-16 panels.

    Professional roof mount installs also look better, they are safer, and can be an integral part of a whole home energy management system.

    Alternatives to plug-in solar systems

    So, you might be wondering, if plug-in solar panels aren’t the way to go, what should I do instead? You can explore getting a professional solar installation, or ask yourself carefully why you want to be getting solar panels in the first place.

    Perhaps you just want a little peace of mind knowing you are doing a little bit to generate your own electricity, or maybe you want source of energy for when the grid is down or to run some equipment in the backyard.

    If that’s the case, there are portable solar generators which fit the bill much better than plug-in solar panels.

    Professional solar installation

    Though the lower cost of plug-in solar panels may seem enticing at first, your best bet is to go with a professionally-installed solar panel system. Image source: Interplay Learning

    Professional solar installations are visually appealing, increase the value of your home, can provide resilience when the grid is down, last over 25 years, and help you save a lot of money on your power bills.

    For all these reasons, we recommend you get quotes from qualified solar installers. You can use our calculator to see what specific rebates and incentives you can qualify for, in addition to the federal tax credit of 30%.

    Solar generators

    A portable solar generator uses solar panels to capture the sun’s energy, and then stores that energy in a battery to be used later. Image source: Greener Choices

    Over the last couple of years, portable solar generators have started to gain a lot of popularity. In a tidy package, you can generate, store, and use electricity.

    Simply hook up portable solar panels to them to charge them up through the day, and you can use them in the evening through early morning for whatever you need, off grid. Some models like the Solar Power Cube pictured above have the panels integrated into their design on wheels.

    Solar generators have a wide range of capacities, from their ability to power entire home circuits when the grid is down, to smaller applications, like providing camp lights and laptop power overnight.

    Check out our recent coverage on how they work and our recommendations on the best solar generator models for your needs.

    Find out how much solar panels will cost for your specific home

    Key takeaways

    • Plug-in solar panels feature a microinverter affixed to their back and a cord to plug into an exterior wall.
    • Even though they cost less than a professional solar panel installation, plug-in solar panels are not worth the expense.
    • Plug-in solar panels do not qualify for solar incentives like SRECs or local rebates.
    • The safety risks and potential utility code violations for plug-in solar panels outweigh any financial benefits (which are minimal).
    • For small-scale energy generation, storage, and usage, consider purchasing a solar generator instead.

    Dan Hahn

    Solar Journalist

    Dan is a solar journalist and content advisor with SolarReviews. He also works with solar installers and solar nonprofits to develop and execute strategic plans.

    Replacement 110V Adapter/Charger for IntelliShock® HotShock® Fence Energizers

    Trickle charger and wall adapter for Solar IntelliShock®, IntelliShock® and HotShock® energizers. Recharges depleted batteries or operates the energizer as a 110V unit when near an outlet.

    Used as a replacement for:

    Note: There are two styles of adapters for Solar IntelliShock® units:

    #1132007 — 110V Adapter/Charger (external port) For plug-in units listed above and Solar IntelliShock units sold after Spring 2020 which have an external charging port on the front of the energizer housing. #1132006 — 110V Adapter/Charger (spade connectors) For Solar IntelliShock® units sold before Spring 2020 which lack an external charging port. These adapters use spade connectors. (See photos above.)

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    How to Use

    Solar IntelliShock® models with an external port: Plug charger into a 110V outlet, insert jack into port located on the front of the energizer.

    Solar IntelliShock® models without an external port (sold prior to Spring 2020): Disconnect solar panel leads to the energizer’s circuit board. Connect recharger leads to the corresponding positive/negative terminals.

    Need help with your energizer or fence? Our Electric Fence Troubleshooting Guide may solve common problems.

    • Turn off the unit. Disconnecting the unit from the fence is not sufficient, the unit will still pulse unless it is turned off.
    • Clean off the solar panel. Dust and debris may have accumulated during use and as a result prevents the panel from maximum electrical production.
    • When the energizer is not being used, store the unit indoors at room temperature and out of the sun. Do not let the energizer sit in the sun for an extended period when it is turned OFF as this could damage the battery.
    • When not in use, ensure the battery stays above 40% charged. Lead acid batteries don’t work well when they’re left discharged, or at a low charge, for long periods of time. Periodically recharge the battery in the sun or with the included 110V charging unit. Stop charging when the battery indicator light flashes GREEN. Do not overcharge the battery.

    Fence Battery Digital Tester

    All-in-one fence tester checks the voltage of energizers, fences and 12V batteries. Simplify electric fence troubleshooting with one device!

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    The plug is very cheap and comes apart. If you get this, don’t plan to plug and unplug it. In winter we were unplugging it nightly when putting chickens to bed, rather than turning off all power, so their water heat could stay on. The plug fell apart and before we could get a replacement, one of our birds tried to go though the dead fence, got stuck, and skinned its neck and head before we could get it out. Not good! 🙁

    I like the adapter/charger. I let it get wet was the only reason it stopped.

    Edward C from Connecticut

    So far, so good. But this is my third power cord in under a year. Premier 1 replaced the first one because it just stopped working. On the second, the wire frayed at the box and the insulation broke, exposing the copper. This one, the 3rd, seems heftier and sturdier than the first two. Just wish the cord was unit was more heavy duty and the wire/insulation was thicker as it is outside. Plus, it has to be unplugged every time I enter the pen and it seems that the more times it is manipulated, the flimsier it gets. Have to use this one as there is no other choice. The fence that it powers is fantastic. Generally, I like Premier 1, just wish the power unit was sturdier. Quick delivery, great customer service.

    The charger is over-priced for the quality. But it is necessary, so it demands a higher price. Would suggest 10 reduction in price with a lower shipping rate. Can get lower cost charger at the local farmstore that looks identical, but is much less expensive given shipping costs. Did not want to void warranty, so bit the bullet on this one.

    About Conductivity

    Conductivity measures the amount of electrical current a material can carry. The opposite measure is known as resistance.

    Many of Premier’s nets feature a green and white superconductor that has both stainless steel and tinned copper filaments for optimal conductivity. These “premium” nets are 10 times more conductive (38 ohms per 1000′) than our “basic” nets. This enables the electric pulse to travel much farther and be less affected by weed contact.

    We do not recommended the basic nets listed below for fences exceeding 500 ft in length:

    Customers who are unhappy with netting are often those who’ve chosen one of these or their farmstore equivalents. Why do we offer them? Because they are similar in design and conductivity (380 ohms) to nets from our competitors—and comparisons make decisions easier.

    Types of Line Posts

    Line posts are built into the net. Three options are available.

    • Single Spike (SS)The best choice, unless your soils are always soft or very hard.
    • Double Spike (DS)Posts allow you to push in the spikes with your foot. When soil is hard or rocky, double spikes are more difficult to install and remove.
    • Drivable Posts (DP)Allows use of a mallet or dead blow hammer for installing posts in dry, hard or rocky soil. Features a “spike stop” for extra support and internal fiberglass ribs for added strength.

    Tip: To insert a line post into frozen or hard soil, use a power tool to drill pilot holes.

    Not all fences have all line post options.

    About Positive/Negative (Pos/Neg) Nets

    Is your area dry?

    Conventional electrified fence systems rely on soil moisture to be effective. However, not all areas have the required moisture.

    Dry soil increases resistance—a weaker, less effective pulse occurs that does not deter animals.

    To overcome this, Pos/Neg nets are wired to allow the use of every other horizontal strand as an extension of the ground terminal. Because half the strands are connected to the ground terminal or ground rod, reliance on soil moisture is reduced. A PowerLink must be purchased separately to make the secondary ground connection.

    How it works…

    In order to receive a shock, the animal must touch both a positive (hot) and negative (grounded) strand at the same time. This will deliver more pain to the animal than an all hot net (Pos/Pos) because moisture in the soil is not required to complete the circuit.

    Pos/Neg fences can be converted to Pos/Pos in moist conditions. Remember, all fences must be kept free of vegetation.

    Not all fences have Pos/Neg options.

    Line Post Spacing

    “Plus” nets—6’8 spacings between built-in line posts

    Standard nets—10′ or 12′ spacings between built-in line posts

    Spacings are approximate. Distance between built-in line posts may vary by product.

    Essential Energizer Advice

    Two Basic Types

    • All-in-one Solar
    • Solar units are very portable.
    • Because they need a battery, these units are more costly to purchase and operate than plug-in units.
    • Batteries are less effective in cold temperatures (deplete faster).
    • Most farmstore solar units are too weak, in joules of output, to properly energize netting. That’s why we designed our own.
    • Plug-in Battery
    • Least cost to purchase and operate per joule of output.
    • Best for fences exposed to heavy vegetation.
    • Cold temperatures do not affect performance.
    • Recommended for whole-farm systems, but can be complex to install. Higher output requires more ground rods, underground cables, multiple output terminals, etc.

    Shipping Zones

    Dr. Dan Morrical, Ph.D.Premier 1 Supplies

    Dan Morrical joined the Iowa State University staff in 1984 as Extension Sheep Specialist after completing his doctorate degree at New Mexico State University. He held the rank of Full Professor as of July 1, 1995 and retired from full-time teaching in 2017. While at Iowa State University, Dr. Dan Morrical was responsible for educational programs in all areas of sheep production, ranging from nutrition, genetics, marketing and management. Research areas focused on applied projects in the areas of nutrition, forage utilization, genetics, out-of-season breeding and lamb survival. Dr. Morrical has been heavily involved in providing educational resources to the sheep industry. He has authored over 30 extension fact sheets, ration balancing software programs, grazing videos and co-authored the nutrition chapter of the SID Handbook with Dr. Margaret Benson from Washington State University. Dr. Morrical now serves as Premier’s on-staff small ruminant nutritionist and sheep production advisor. Most recently, he’s introduced a line of “GOLD FORMULA” mineral premixes under The Shepherd’s Choice® brand, aimed to maximize hoof health and immunity.

    Braided vs. Twisted

    Braiding instead of twisting the horizontals increases the frequency of metal filaments on the outside of the strand.

    110w, monocrystalline, solar, panel, professional, dc-110

    What’s the benefit?

    • metal is exposed on the outside of the strand. This enables improved animal to conductor contact. The electric pulse is better able to travel from the fence and into the animal, resulting in a memorable shock.
    • A tighter, braided weave results in fewer snags when carried or pulled through pastures, reducing frustration.

    Replacement 110V Recharger/Power Supply for SolarStop™ Fence Energizers

    Trickle charger and wall plug adapter for SolarStop™ fence energizers. Recharges depleted batteries or operates the energizer as a 110V unit when near an outlet.

    • Input: 100-240V~50/60Hz, 0.45A MAX
    • Output: 13.8V, up to 1500mA
    • Polarity: Positive outer, negative center (will not recharge other energizers)
    • 1.5 amp draw depending on level of battery depletion
    • 6 ft cord
    • Red light indicates charging, green light is fully charged

    How to Use

    Move the energizer indoors and near a 110V wall outlet. For your safety, ensure the wiring harness is NOT connected to the output terminals (fence and ground).

    Attach the 110V Battery Recharger/Power Supply into a wall outlet and also into the recharging port on the side of the energizer. With the energizer OFF, recharge the battery until the battery measures between 12.6 and 13.4 volts. Depending on the state of charge, recharging may require 24–48 hours to fully charge a depleted battery.

    Before testing, the battery should be allowed to “relax” for 30 minutes. Use a Digital Battery Tester or a multimeter to test the battery. Wall plug LED changes from RED to GREEN when fully charged.

    • RED light indicates the recharger is charging the battery
    • GREEN indicates the battery is charged

    Need help with your energizer or fence? Our Electric Fence Troubleshooting Guide may solve common problems.

    If this wall charger is used on a unit other than the SolarStop™ 80, the energizer may be damaged due to the differing polarities of the port/adapter. Using an incompatible wall recharger is NOT covered by the energizer’s warranty.

    SolarStop™ 80 Fence Energizer Kit with Digital Tester

    Solar powered 0.8 output joule energizer for electric fences. Used to contain sheep, goats, poultry, swine, cattle and horses. Effective against predators.

    Fence Battery Digital Tester

    All-in-one fence tester checks the voltage of energizers, fences and 12V batteries. Simplify electric fence troubleshooting with one device!

    Write a Review

    You must be logged in to leave a review. Please sign in.

    About Conductivity

    Conductivity measures the amount of electrical current a material can carry. The opposite measure is known as resistance.

    Many of Premier’s nets feature a green and white superconductor that has both stainless steel and tinned copper filaments for optimal conductivity. These “premium” nets are 10 times more conductive (38 ohms per 1000′) than our “basic” nets. This enables the electric pulse to travel much farther and be less affected by weed contact.

    We do not recommended the basic nets listed below for fences exceeding 500 ft in length:

    Customers who are unhappy with netting are often those who’ve chosen one of these or their farmstore equivalents. Why do we offer them? Because they are similar in design and conductivity (380 ohms) to nets from our competitors—and comparisons make decisions easier.

    Types of Line Posts

    Line posts are built into the net. Three options are available.

    • Single Spike (SS)The best choice, unless your soils are always soft or very hard.
    • Double Spike (DS)Posts allow you to push in the spikes with your foot. When soil is hard or rocky, double spikes are more difficult to install and remove.
    • Drivable Posts (DP)Allows use of a mallet or dead blow hammer for installing posts in dry, hard or rocky soil. Features a “spike stop” for extra support and internal fiberglass ribs for added strength.

    Tip: To insert a line post into frozen or hard soil, use a power tool to drill pilot holes.

    Not all fences have all line post options.

    About Positive/Negative (Pos/Neg) Nets

    Is your area dry?

    Conventional electrified fence systems rely on soil moisture to be effective. However, not all areas have the required moisture.

    Dry soil increases resistance—a weaker, less effective pulse occurs that does not deter animals.

    To overcome this, Pos/Neg nets are wired to allow the use of every other horizontal strand as an extension of the ground terminal. Because half the strands are connected to the ground terminal or ground rod, reliance on soil moisture is reduced. A PowerLink must be purchased separately to make the secondary ground connection.

    How it works…

    In order to receive a shock, the animal must touch both a positive (hot) and negative (grounded) strand at the same time. This will deliver more pain to the animal than an all hot net (Pos/Pos) because moisture in the soil is not required to complete the circuit.

    Pos/Neg fences can be converted to Pos/Pos in moist conditions. Remember, all fences must be kept free of vegetation.

    Not all fences have Pos/Neg options.

    Line Post Spacing

    “Plus” nets—6’8 spacings between built-in line posts

    Standard nets—10′ or 12′ spacings between built-in line posts

    Spacings are approximate. Distance between built-in line posts may vary by product.

    Essential Energizer Advice

    Two Basic Types

    • All-in-one Solar
    • Solar units are very portable.
    • Because they need a battery, these units are more costly to purchase and operate than plug-in units.
    • Batteries are less effective in cold temperatures (deplete faster).
    • Most farmstore solar units are too weak, in joules of output, to properly energize netting. That’s why we designed our own.
    • Plug-in Battery
    • Least cost to purchase and operate per joule of output.
    • Best for fences exposed to heavy vegetation.
    • Cold temperatures do not affect performance.
    • Recommended for whole-farm systems, but can be complex to install. Higher output requires more ground rods, underground cables, multiple output terminals, etc.

    Shipping Zones

    Dr. Dan Morrical, Ph.D.Premier 1 Supplies

    Dan Morrical joined the Iowa State University staff in 1984 as Extension Sheep Specialist after completing his doctorate degree at New Mexico State University. He held the rank of Full Professor as of July 1, 1995 and retired from full-time teaching in 2017. While at Iowa State University, Dr. Dan Morrical was responsible for educational programs in all areas of sheep production, ranging from nutrition, genetics, marketing and management. Research areas focused on applied projects in the areas of nutrition, forage utilization, genetics, out-of-season breeding and lamb survival. Dr. Morrical has been heavily involved in providing educational resources to the sheep industry. He has authored over 30 extension fact sheets, ration balancing software programs, grazing videos and co-authored the nutrition chapter of the SID Handbook with Dr. Margaret Benson from Washington State University. Dr. Morrical now serves as Premier’s on-staff small ruminant nutritionist and sheep production advisor. Most recently, he’s introduced a line of “GOLD FORMULA” mineral premixes under The Shepherd’s Choice® brand, aimed to maximize hoof health and immunity.

    Braided vs. Twisted

    Braiding instead of twisting the horizontals increases the frequency of metal filaments on the outside of the strand.

    What’s the benefit?

    • metal is exposed on the outside of the strand. This enables improved animal to conductor contact. The electric pulse is better able to travel from the fence and into the animal, resulting in a memorable shock.
    • A tighter, braided weave results in fewer snags when carried or pulled through pastures, reducing frustration.

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